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1385 records – page 1 of 139.

A 10 year follow up of parenteral gold therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14307
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 1996 Mar;55(3):169-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
G. Bendix
A. Bjelle
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Gothenburg University, Sweden.
Source
Ann Rheum Dis. 1996 Mar;55(3):169-76
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Comparative Study
Drug Tolerance
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gold Sodium Thiomalate - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Male
Middle Aged
Probability
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To study the long term tolerance of parenteral gold and subsequent drug treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, including prediction of outcome and 'survival' of sequential treatments. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of 376 patients was made, including a detailed screening of 237 patients treated in 1989. Reasons for discontinuing treatment were analysed in life table analyses, which were used to compare patients receiving parenteral gold treatment in 1985 and 1989, and two groups of patients receiving disease modifying antirheumatic drugs after parenteral gold treatment. The causes of discontinuation were followed in sequential treatments. RESULTS: The estimated probability of discontinuation of parenteral gold treatment was 29% after six months and 42%, 55%, 74%, and 92% after 1, 2, 5, and 10 years, respectively. Mucocutaneous side effects were the main cause of discontinuation of parenteral gold treatment during the first three years, while the probability of discontinuation because of inefficacy dominated after four years. Side effects also constituted the main cause of discontinuation of treatments given after parenteral gold treatment during the first three years of follow up. No significant differences were found when comparing the termination rates between the first and the second and subsequent treatments after parenteral gold treatment. The main reasons for discontinuing one treatment could not predict the cause of discontinuation of the next treatment. CONCLUSION: Mucocutaneous side effects dominated initially, while inefficacy was the dominating cause of discontinuation of long term parenteral gold treatment. No serious side effects were registered. The cause of discontinuation of one treatment did not predict the cause of discontinuation of the following drug. Drug 'survival' was the same in both treatments after parenteral gold treatment.
PubMed ID
8712879 View in PubMed
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A 10-year survey of clinically significant blood culture isolates and antibiotic susceptibilities from adult patients with hematological diseases at a major Swedish hospital.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25350
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1990;22(4):381-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
H. Fredlund
M. Björeman
J. Kjellander
L. Sjöberg
L. Bjorne
A L Ohlin
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Orebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1990;22(4):381-91
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Quinolones
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Anti-Infective Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteria, Aerobic - isolation & purification
Comparative Study
Drug Therapy, Combination - therapeutic use
Female
Hematologic Diseases - complications - drug therapy - microbiology
Humans
Leukemia - complications
Leukemia, Nonlymphocytic, Acute - complications
Lymphoma - complications
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Retrospective Studies
Septicemia - drug therapy - microbiology
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
In patients treated with cytotoxic drugs granulocytopenia and septicemia are commonly seen. In this 10-year survey 324 blood culture isolates from 184 patients with hematological diseases and septicemia were studied. The distribution of microbiological diagnoses in patients with hematological diseases as well as acute leukemia 1980-1986 was significantly different (p less than 0.01) from an unselected blood culture material from the same period. The differences are mainly seen between Enterobacteriaceae other than Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococci. The microbiological spectrum for patients with hematological disease 1987-1989 was also significantly different (p less than 0.05) from the spectrum of the same group of patients 1980-1986 due to higher frequencies of coagulase-negative staphylococci and alpha-streptococci and lower frequency of E. coli in the latter period. 40% of the isolates were gram-positive cocci during the first period and increased to 50% during the second period. The susceptibility testing indicates that trimethoprim/sulfonamide is not as good a choice as ciprofloxacin or norfloxacin for oral antibiotic prophylaxis. For intravenous therapy imipenem/cilastatin or the combinations of an aminoglycoside/piperacillin or aminoglycoside/third generation cephalosporin have advantages over aminoglycoside/trimethoprim/sulfa in combination. However, addition of isoxazolylpenicillin or vancomycin now seems necessary to cover the increasing part of gram-positive bacteria causing septicemia in patients with hematological disease.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Infect Dis. 1991;23(4):5151957139
PubMed ID
2218401 View in PubMed
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A 10-year survey of inflammatory bowel diseases-drug therapy, costs and adverse reactions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71979
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2001 Apr;15(4):475-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
P. Blomqvist
N. Feltelius
R. Löfberg
A. Ekbom
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Paul.Blomqvist@mep.ki.se
Source
Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2001 Apr;15(4):475-81
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - adverse effects - economics - therapeutic use
Drug Costs - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - drug therapy - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Support
Physician's Practice Patterns
Prescriptions, Drug - economics
Retrospective Studies
Steroids
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Drug therapy for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis is based on anti-inflammatory and immunodulating drugs, nutritional support and surgical resection. Recently, new drugs have been introduced. AIM: To report drug prescriptions, costs and adverse reactions among inflammatory bowel disease patients in Sweden between 1988 and 1997. METHODS: Drug use was calculated from the national Diagnosis and therapy survey and drug costs from prescriptions and drug sales. Adverse drug reactions were obtained from the Medical Products Agency's National Pharmacovigilance system. RESULTS: The annual drug exposure for Crohn's disease was 0.55 million daily doses per million population, mainly supplementation and aminosalicylic acids. Mesalazine and olsalazine had 61% within this group. For ulcerative colitis patients, drug exposure was 0.61 million daily doses per million per year and aminosalicylic acids fell from 70% to 65%. For inflammatory bowel disease patients, corticosteroids and nutritional supplementation were common. The annual average cost for inflammatory bowel disease drugs was 7.0 million US dollars. Annually, 32 adverse drug reactions were reported, mainly haematological reactions such as agranulocytosis and pancytopenia (60%), followed by skin reactions. Only two deaths were reported. Aminosalicylic acids were the most commonly reported compounds. CONCLUSIONS: Drug use for inflammatory bowel disease in the pre-biologic agent era rested on aminosalicylic acid drugs and corticosteroids with stable levels, proportions and costs. The level of adverse drug reactions was low but haematological reactions support the monitoring of inflammatory bowel disease patients.
PubMed ID
11284775 View in PubMed
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10-year survival of total ankle arthroplasties: a report on 780 cases from the Swedish Ankle Register.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129819
Source
Acta Orthop. 2011 Dec;82(6):655-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2011
Author
Anders Henricson
Jan-Åke Nilsson
Ake Carlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Orthopedics , Falun Central Hospital and Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun, Sweden. anders.henricson@ltdalarna.se
Source
Acta Orthop. 2011 Dec;82(6):655-9
Date
Dec-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Ankle - adverse effects - methods
Cementation
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Joint Prosthesis - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Registries
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
There is an ongoing need to review large series of total ankle replacements (TARs) for monitoring of changes in practice and their outcome. 4 national registries, including the Swedish Ankle Register, have previously reported their 5-year results. We now present an extended series with a longer follow-up, and with a 10-year survival analysis.
Records of uncemented 3-component TARs were retrospectively reviewed, determining risk factors such as age, sex, and diagnosis. Prosthetic survival rates were calculated with exchange or removal of components as endpoint-excluding incidental exchange of the polyethylene meniscus.
Of the 780 prostheses implanted since 1993, 168 (22%) had been revised by June 15, 2010. The overall survival rate fell from 0.81 (95% CI: 0.79-0.83) at 5 years to 0.69 (95% CI: 0.67-0.71) at 10 years. The survival rate was higher, although not statistically significantly so, during the latter part of the period investigated. Excluding the STAR prosthesis, the survival rate for all the remaining designs was 0.78 at 10 years. Women below the age of 60 with osteoarthritis were at a higher risk of revision, but age did not influence the outcome in men or women with rheumatoid arthritis. Revisions due to technical mistakes at the index surgery and instability were undertaken earlier than revisions for other reasons.
The results have slowly improved during the 18-year period investigated. However, we do not believe that the survival rates of ankle replacements in the near future will approach those of hip and knee replacements-even though improved instrumentation and design of the prostheses, together with better patient selection, will presumably give better results.
Notes
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2003 Jul;85-A(7):1321-912851358
Cites: Foot Ankle Surg. 2011 Sep;17(3):99-10221783065
Cites: Arch Orthop Trauma Surg. 2005 Mar;125(2):109-1915690167
Cites: Orthopade. 2006 May;35(5):527-3216598490
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2006 Jun;88(6):1272-8416757761
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2007 Oct;78(5):569-7417966014
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2007 Oct;78(5):575-8317966015
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2007 Oct;78(5):584-9117966016
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2008 May;90(5):605-918450626
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2008 Jul;90(7):885-818591597
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2009 Jan;91(1):69-7419092007
Cites: Foot Ankle Int. 2009 Jul;30(7):631-919589309
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2010 Jan;468(1):199-20819618248
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2010 Apr;468(4):951-719609630
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2010 Feb;81(1):10-420175657
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2010 Feb;81(1):114-820180720
Cites: Foot Ankle Int. 2010 Apr;31(4):301-520371016
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Br. 2010 Jul;92(7):958-6220595114
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2010 Sep 15;92(12):2150-520844156
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2010 Dec;81(6):745-721067435
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2011 Jan;469(1):225-3620593253
Cites: Foot Ankle Int. 2010 Dec;31(12):1048-5621189204
Cites: Foot Ankle Int. 2011 May;32(5):S493-50221733457
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2004 Jul;(424):73-915241146
PubMed ID
22066551 View in PubMed
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25 years or more after spinal cord injury: clinical conditions of individuals in the Florence and Stockholm areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129470
Source
Spinal Cord. 2012 Mar;50(3):243-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
L. Werhagen
S. Aito
L. Tucci
J. Strayer
C. Hultling
Author Affiliation
Karolinska institutet Danderyds Sjukhus, Department of clinical sciences, Division of Rehabilitation Medicine, Danderyds hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. lars.werhagen @ki.se
Source
Spinal Cord. 2012 Mar;50(3):243-6
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ethnic Groups
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Italy
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Severity of Illness Index
Spinal Cord Injuries - complications - etiology - therapy
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Retrospective analysis and retrospective follow-up.
Spinal cord injury (SCI) patients have today a nearly normal lifespan. Avoidance of medical complications is key to this end. The aim of the study was to analyse health in individuals surviving 25 years or more after traumatic SCI in Stockholm and Florence, and compare medical complications.
Data from the databases of the Spinal Unit of Florence and from the Spinalis, Stockholm were analysed. Patients included were C2-L 2, American Spinal Cord Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) A-C, and =25 years post traumatic SCI. Patients underwent a thorough neurological and general examination, and were interviewed about medical events during those years. Analysed data include: gender, age at injury, current age, neurological level, AIS, cause of injury, presence of neuropathic pain (NP), and spasticity and medical complications.
A total of 66 Italian patients and 74 Swedish patients were included. The only statistical difference between the groups was cause of injury due to falls was higher in the Florence group (P
PubMed ID
22105457 View in PubMed
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A 30-year survey of pulmonary embolism verified at autopsy: an analysis of 1274 surgical patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239210
Source
Br J Surg. 1985 Feb;72(2):105-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1985
Author
D. Bergqvist
B. Lindblad
Source
Br J Surg. 1985 Feb;72(2):105-8
Date
Feb-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Autopsy
Humans
Length of Stay
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Postoperative Period
Pulmonary Embolism - epidemiology - mortality
Retrospective Studies
Surgical Procedures, Operative
Sweden
Abstract
A retrospective study was undertaken of all surgical patients in Malmö, Sweden, during the period 1951-1980, in whom pulmonary emboli were found at autopsy. The autopsy rate was high throughout the period, ranging from 73 to 100 per cent. Of 5477 patients who died during the period, 1274 had pulmonary emboli (23.6 per cent), 349 of which were considered fatal, 353 contributory to death and 572 incidental. Fifty-one per cent of the patients were not operated upon. The number of contributory and incidental emboli increased over the period, to some extent probably reflecting greater thoroughness in postmortems. The frequency of fatal pulmonary emboli decreased in the last 5 year period. Pulmonary embolism was more rare in patients under 50 years of age. The proportion of females increased. In 24 cases major embolism emanated from thrombi around central venous catheters. This retrospective analysis of a large number of patients shows that pulmonary embolism continues to be a major cause of death in surgical patients, and in Malmö as common a cause of death in operated as in nonoperated patients.
PubMed ID
3971113 View in PubMed
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75% success rate after open debridement, exchange of tibial insert, and antibiotics in knee prosthetic joint infections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267766
Source
Acta Orthop. 2015;86(4):457-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Anna Holmberg
Valdís Gudrún Thórhallsdóttir
Otto Robertsson
Annette W-Dahl
Anna Stefánsdóttir
Source
Acta Orthop. 2015;86(4):457-62
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee - methods
Debridement - methods
Drug Therapy, Combination
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Knee Prosthesis - microbiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prosthesis-Related Infections - therapy
Registries
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Rifampin - therapeutic use
Staphylococcus aureus - isolation & purification
Sweden
Tibia - surgery
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Wound Healing
Abstract
Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a leading cause of early revision after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Open debridement with exchange of tibial insert allows treatment of infection with retention of fixed components. We investigated the success rate of this procedure in the treatment of knee PJIs in a nationwide material, and determined whether the results were affected by microbiology, antibiotic treatment, or timing of debridement.
145 primary TKAs revised for the first time, due to infection, with debridement and exchange of the tibial insert were identified in the Swedish Knee Arthroplasty Register (SKAR). Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen (37%) followed by coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) (23%). Failure was defined as death before the end of antibiotic treatment, revision of major components due to infection, life-long antibiotic treatment, or chronic infection.
The overall healing rate was 75%. The type of infecting pathogen did not statistically significantly affect outcome. Staphylococcal infections treated without a combination of antibiotics including rifampin had a higher failure rate than those treated with rifampin (RR = 4, 95% CI: 2-10). In the 16 cases with more than 3 weeks of symptoms before treatment, the healing rate was 62%, as compared to 77% in the other cases (p = 0.2). The few patients with a revision model of prosthesis at primary operation had a high failure rate (5 of 8).
Good results can be achieved by open debridement with exchange of tibial insert. It is important to use an antibiotic combination including rifampin in staphylococcal infections.
Notes
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2013 Dec;84(6):509-1624171687
Cites: Infection. 2013 Apr;41(2):431-722987291
Cites: Acta Orthop. 2013 Aug;84(4):380-623848215
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2013 Sep;28(8 Suppl):120-123886410
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2013 Nov;471(11):3672-823904245
Cites: Infection. 2003 Mar;31(2):99-10812682815
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2003 Nov;(416):129-3414646751
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Oct 14;351(16):1645-5415483283
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1981 Jan-Feb;(154):201-77009009
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1993 Feb;75(2):282-98423191
Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1993 Dec;75(12):1844-528258558
Cites: JAMA. 1998 May 20;279(19):1537-419605897
Cites: Am J Med. 2006 Nov;119(11):993.e7-1017071171
Cites: J Antimicrob Chemother. 2009 Jun;63(6):1264-7119336454
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2010 Oct;25(7):1022-720378306
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2011 Mar;17(3):439-4420412187
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2011 Apr;469(4):970-620544317
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2011 Apr;469(4):961-921080127
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2011 Jun;17(6):862-720825437
Cites: J Arthroplasty. 2011 Sep;26(6 Suppl):114-821621955
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2011 Nov;469(11):2992-421938532
Cites: Clin Microbiol Infect. 2012 Dec;18(12):1176-8423046277
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2013 Jan;56(1):1-1023230301
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2013 Jan;56(2):182-9422942204
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2013 Jan;471(1):250-722552768
Cites: Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2013 Jan;57(1):350-523114758
PubMed ID
25753311 View in PubMed
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[A 5-year series. Injuries in moped and motorcycle accidents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241814
Source
Lakartidningen. 1983 Jun 15;80(24):2514-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-15-1983

The AAA with a challenging neck: outcome of open versus endovascular repair with standard and fenestrated stent-grafts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88967
Source
J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):137-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Chisci Emiliano
Kristmundsson Thorarinn
de Donato Gianmarco
Resch Timothy
Setacci Francesco
Sonesson Björn
Setacci Carlo
Malina Martin
Author Affiliation
Vascular and Endovascular Surgery Unit, University of Siena, Italy. e.chisci@gmail.com
Source
J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):137-46
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - mortality - radiography - surgery
Aortography - methods
Blood Vessel Prosthesis
Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - instrumentation - mortality
Female
Humans
Italy
Kaplan-Meiers Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prosthesis Design
Prosthesis Failure
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Stents
Sweden
Time Factors
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
PURPOSE: To compare the outcome of endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) versus conventional open repair (OR) in patients with a short, angulated or otherwise challenging proximal neck. METHODS: The definition of a challenging proximal neck was based on diameter (>or=28 mm), length (or=60 degrees ), shape (reverse tapered or bulging), and thrombus lining (>50%). Between January 2005 and December 2007, 187 consecutive patients (159 men; mean age 73 years, range 48-92) operated for asymptomatic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) were identified as having challenging proximal neck morphology. Of these, 61 patients were treated with OR at center I (group A), 71 with standard EVAR (group B; 45 center I, 29 center II) and 52 with fenestrated EVAR (group C) at center II. Clinical examination and computed tomography were performed at 1 month and yearly thereafter. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference between groups A, B, and C regarding primary technical success rate, 30-day mortality, or late AAA-related mortality. The mean length of follow-up was 19.5 months (range 0-40). Freedom from reintervention at 3 years was 91.8%, 79.7%, and 82.7% for groups A, B, and C, respectively (p = 0.042). The only statistically significant difference between standard and fenestrated EVAR was a higher incidence of late sac expansion [9 (12.2%) versus 1 (1.9%), p = 0.036] in the standard stent-graft group. Reinterventions were more frequent after EVAR (p = NS), but open reinterventions were more common after OR. Reinterventions after EVAR were related to the presence of an angulated (p = 0.039) or short neck (p = 0.024). CONCLUSION: The results of EVAR and OR were similar for AAAs with a challenging proximal neck. Endovascular reinterventions were more frequent after EVAR, particularly in patients with an angulated or short neck. Open reinterventions were more common after OR. More patients and long-term data are needed to confirm these findings.
Notes
Comment In: J Endovasc Ther. 2009 Apr;16(2):147-819456195
PubMed ID
19456190 View in PubMed
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1385 records – page 1 of 139.