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Changing elderly in a changing society. Danish elderly in the next century.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223633
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1992 Jun;39(3):232-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
H. Friis
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1992 Jun;39(3):232-4
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Delivery of Health Care - trends
Demography
Denmark
Forecasting
Housing - trends
Humans
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Retirement - trends
Social Change
Abstract
A cross-sectional and multidisciplinary study on the situation of the elderly in Denmark at the beginning of the next century was undertaken in the late 1980s. The intention was to give a picture of the future cohorts of elderly, and their expectations for old age. The study also looked into the ways in which future societal developments might affect the situation of the elderly. In order to test a number of hypotheses on the future elderly and their preferences for life when they grow older, 1200 persons in the age groups 40-44, 50-54, and 60-64 years old were interviewed. Further, a number of studies were commissioned on developments which may affect the elderly with regard to health, housing, family, work and retirement, financial conditions, leisure activities and political participation. A main conclusion is that the future elderly in most areas--be it financial conditions, health, housing education--will be in a more favourable position than their predecessors after retirement. But there will still be a minority who suffer a hard life. They are the people whose finances are weak, whose health is impaired, and who lack social contacts.
PubMed ID
1638884 View in PubMed
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Early retirement among Danish female cleaners and shop assistants according to work environment characteristics and upper extremity complaints: an 11-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278920
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2016 May 04;17:202
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-04-2016
Author
Lone Donbæk Jensen
Jens Peter Ellekilde Bonde
Michael Victor Christensen
Thomas Maribo
Source
BMC Musculoskelet Disord. 2016 May 04;17:202
Date
May-04-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Disabled Persons
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Registries
Retirement - trends
Risk factors
Upper Extremity - pathology
Workload
Abstract
Studies have shown a negative social gradient in the incidence of early retirement. To prevent undesired early retirement, there is a need for knowledge of specific predictors in addition to social factors with a limited potential for change. The main purpose of this study was to examine musculoskeletal complaints and working conditions as predictors of early retirement among Danish female cleaners.
Using Cox regression with an adjustment for extraneous factors, we compared the risk of disability pension and retirement before the nominal retirement age (65 years) in an 11-year cohort study with registry-based follow-up of 1430 female cleaners and 579 shop assistants. In subsequent analyses of female cleaners, disability pension and voluntary early retirement were modeled according to work characteristics and upper extremity complaints.
The adjusted hazard rate (HR) for disability pension among cleaners compared to the control group was 2.27 (95% CI 1.58 to 3.28) and, for voluntary early retirement, 1.01 (95% CI 0.85 to 1.20). In the subset of cleaners, the predictors of disability pension were persistent shoulder pain HR: 1.98 (95% CI 1.47 to 2.67), elbow pain HR: 1.41 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.94) and symptoms of nerve entrapment of the hand HR: 1.58 (95% CI 1.14 to 2.20). Predictors of voluntary early retirement were persistent shoulder pain HR: 1.40 (95% CI 1.16 to 1.67) and floor mopping for more than 10 h per week HR: 1.20 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.40).
Cleaners have a twofold higher risk of disability pension compared to the control group. Risk factors for disability pension among cleaners were persistent shoulder and elbow pain together with symptoms of nerve entrapment of the hand. The findings of specific health related predictors of early retirement could be used in secondary prevention with targeted temporary reduced workload.
Notes
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2003;31(1):63-812623527
Cites: Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2004;17(4):465-7115852761
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2005 Dec;31(6):438-4916425585
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2007;35(5):497-50217852980
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2007;7:21517716365
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2008 Jun;18(3):224-3118245150
Cites: Ergonomics. 2009 Oct;52(10):1226-3919787502
Cites: Work. 2009;34(1):105-1619923681
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011;11:40621619716
Cites: Appl Ergon. 2013 Mar;44(2):241-5322939526
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2012;12:66122894644
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2013 May 1;39(3):233-4023460255
Cites: Pain. 2013 Jun;154(6):933-4123688829
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2013 Nov;39(6):568-7723811718
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2014 Apr;71(4):295-30124169931
Cites: BMJ Open. 2014;4(8):e00523025142263
PubMed ID
27146856 View in PubMed
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Early retirement pensions in Sweden: trends and regional variations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249106
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1978;6(1):7-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
1978
Author
H. Berglind
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1978;6(1):7-16
Date
1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Female
Humans
Legislation as Topic
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions - trends
Retirement - trends
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Sex Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The total number of early retirement pensiones has risen sharply since the end of the 1960s. The increase was greatest during the early 1970s following a reform in 1970 which extended the right to early retirement pension to older workers because of labour market considerations. This article discusses various conceivable explanations for the growth in the number of early retirement pensioners and regional variations of this phenomenon. The following explanatory factors are considered: (a) The prospects of getting (keeping) a job. (b) Work capacity. (c) The nature of the pension scheme. (d) Alternative possibilities of support. (e) Preferences concerning early retirement pensions. The discussion focuses on two explanations highlighted in the public debate in Sweden: changes in pension legislation and the role of the solidarity wages policy. An empirical analysis of variations at the provincial level reveals a definite correlation between the proportion of early retirement pensioners and various indices of unemployment and underemployment.
PubMed ID
635502 View in PubMed
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Globalization, commodification and mass transplant of nurses: Part 1.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161418
Source
Br J Nurs. 2007 Jul 26-Aug 8;16(14):876-80
Publication Type
Article
Author
John R Cutcliffe
Susan Yarbrough
Author Affiliation
University of Texas at Tyler, USA.
Source
Br J Nurs. 2007 Jul 26-Aug 8;16(14):876-80
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Commodification
Developed Countries
Developing Countries
Emigration and Immigration - trends
Forecasting
Foreign Professional Personnel - supply & distribution
Great Britain
Health Policy
Health services needs and demand
Humans
International Cooperation
Licensure, Nursing - trends
Nursing Staff - organization & administration
Personnel Selection - organization & administration
Population Growth
Retirement - trends
United States
World Health
Abstract
The world is currently facing a shortage of nurses and this is predicted to worsen as a result of the looming en masse retirement of the so-called 'baby-boom' generation. Moreover, this problem is foreseen to be far more pronounced in Western countries where the post-Second World War 'baby-boom' demographic was (and is) most prominent. Data collected by various international organizations illustrates a corresponding recent increase in nurse migration and that such mass transplantation inevitably involves the unidirectional movement of nurses from developing countries to developed Western countries. As a result, this two-part article examines this mass transplantation within the context of globalization. Part one provides compelling international data regarding the global shortage of nurses and the corresponding increase in nurse migration from 'underdeveloped' to 'Western' countries. It then situates the phenomenon in the context of global health and highlights the extent of the debate so far, such as it is.
PubMed ID
17851350 View in PubMed
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Pharmacy faculty retirement at colleges and schools of pharmacy in the United States and Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126214
Source
Am J Pharm Educ. 2012 Feb 10;76(1):4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-2012
Author
David A Latif
Fadi M Alkhateeb
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Charleston, Charleston, WV, USA. davidlatif@ucwv.edu
Source
Am J Pharm Educ. 2012 Feb 10;76(1):4
Date
Feb-10-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection - methods - trends
Faculty
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retirement - trends
Schools, Pharmacy - trends
United States
Abstract
To examine the work-related activities of full-time faculty members 55 years of age and older; to describe the retirement plans and perceptions of these faculty members; and to examine the factors, perceptions, or conditions that might influence the retirement decision.
Pharmacy faculty members aged 55 years and older in the United States and Canada were invited to participate in an online survey regarding their perceptions on issues related to their retirement planning behavior.
Four hundred eighty-eight faculty members completed the survey instrument. The typical respondent worked 50 hours per week on work-related activities, was active in teaching and service, and had published an average of 5 refereed papers during the previous 36 months. The number of articles published was positively related to the respondent's target retirement age. The average anticipated retirement age was 66.6 years, and most respondents participated in a defined benefit plan. The majority would revise their target retirement age downwards if conditions were favorable.
The primary factors that influence the pharmacy faculty retirement decision include financial status, academic productivity, and higher order needs such as the opportunity to participate in meaningful activities. These findings can be used by administrators in strategic planning related to attracting and retaining quality faculty members.
Notes
Cites: Am J Pharm Educ. 2008 Apr 15;72(2):3418496923
Cites: J Nurs Educ. 2006 Sep;45(9):349-5517002081
PubMed ID
22412203 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Sep;30(3):401-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Lynn McDonald
Peter Donahue
Author Affiliation
Institute for Life Course and Aging, University of Toronto, ON. lynn.mcdonald@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2011 Sep;30(3):401-22
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retirement - trends
Abstract
In this article, we raise the question as to whether retirement is lost as we currently know and understand it in Canada. With a selected review, we examine retirement research according to the scope of retirement and the new retirement, possible theoretical developments, the timing of transitions into retirement, and life as a retiree including the quality or lack of pensions. Accordingly, we propose that retirement is undergoing modifications on the basis of several trends that commenced before the 2008 economic downturn. The data would appear to lean towards the emergence of a different type of retirement, insofar as the collective Canadian vision of retirement is lost, notwithstanding the economic meltdown in global markets.
PubMed ID
21923965 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.