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Able or unable to work? Life trajectory after severe occupational injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature310745
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2019 09; 41(18):2192-2198
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-2019
Author
Jarna Kulmala
Arto Luoma
Lasse Koskinen
Author Affiliation
a Faculty of Management , University of Tampere , Tampere , Finland.
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2019 09; 41(18):2192-2198
Date
09-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Income
Injury Severity Score
Life Change Events
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Injuries - epidemiology - rehabilitation
Registries
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Return to Work - statistics & numerical data
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Purpose: To study the probabilities and permanence of return to work, inability to work and rehabilitation, and to explore the connection between these life situations and later working after a severe occupational injury. Materials and methods: A historical cohort of Finnish workers with a severe occupational injury during 2008 (N?=?11,585) were followed up annually on the outcomes of return to work over a 5-year observation period. We examined transition probabilities from one life situation to another with Markov chain analysis, and applied logistic regression with generalized estimating equations to assess the effect of register-based determinants on return to work. Results: Within the five anniversaries, 85% of the injured were working, 9% were unable to work (fully or partly) and 2% received rehabilitation. Age, gross annual income, type of work, injured body part, injury type and the injured's annual condition subsequent to the work injury were significant determinants of return to work. Conclusions: The probability of return to work decreased with time, but, on average, one-fifth of the injured workers succeeded in return to work after being unable to work on the previous anniversary, which indicates that it is worthwhile to conduct efforts for this target group in order to promote return to work. Implications for Rehabilitation The current life situation of the injured should be taken into account when promoting return to work, as it is a strong predictor of later working after a serious occupational injury. Rehabilitation and return to work programs should start in time due to declining return to work rates as the disability continues. Return to work on a part-time basis could be a good option during the early phases of recovery, since a notable proportion of those partly unable to work on the first anniversary returned later to full-time workers. The probability of recovery is relatively high even for those with long-term disabilities, so the promotion of return to work is highly recommended also for this target group.
PubMed ID
29688084 View in PubMed
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Age-related variation in recent life events preceding suicide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215192
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 1995 May;183(5):325-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1995
Author
M E Heikkinen
E T Isometsä
H M Aro
S J Sarna
J K Lönnqvist
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Department of Mental Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Nerv Ment Dis. 1995 May;183(5):325-31
Date
May-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Family
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Life Change Events
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Risk
Sex Factors
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Recent life events as reported by the next of kin were explored in male and female suicide victims to see how these factors varied across age groups by decade of age. The study population comprised all 1022 suicide victims aged 20 years and older in Finland during a 12-month period who had life event data assessed as reliable by the interviewing mental health professionals. Age-related patterns of variation of life events were found: separation, serious family arguments, financial trouble, job problems, unemployment, and residence change were more common among younger victims, whereas somatic illness and retirement were more common among older victims. Mean number of life events, greater among men than women, tended to decline gradually across the age range. In terms of sex differences, somatic illness was more common among elderly men, while separation, financial trouble, and unemployment were more common among younger men. Most life events among younger age groups were possibly dependent upon the victims' own behavior. Logistic regression indicated association between specific life events and alcohol misuse: separation, serious family arguments, financial trouble and unemployment were especially related to alcohol misuse. Violent suicide method lacked association with life events, being commoner only among males and those not having misused alcohol. Age- and sex-specific control groups and multidimensional life event interview schedules are needed to further investigate the relative risk of life events in suicide.
PubMed ID
7745388 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption, problem drinking, abstention and disability pension award. The Nord-Tr√łndelag Health Study (HUNT).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133418
Source
Addiction. 2012 Jan;107(1):98-108
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Ann Kristin Knudsen
Arnstein Mykletun
Sverre Nesvåg
Simon Øverland
Author Affiliation
Research Centre for Health Promotion, Faculty of Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Addiction. 2012 Jan;107(1):98-108
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholism - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Behavior
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Sick Leave - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Social Security - statistics & numerical data
Temperance - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine associations of abstention, alcohol consumption and problem drinking with subsequent disability pensioning (DP), and whether previous excessive consumption ('sick-quitting') could explain some of the increased risk for DP among abstainers.
Prospective population-based study.
Data were from two waves of the Nord-Tr?ndelag Health Study (HUNT) linked with the national insurance database. The two main analyses included 37,729 (alcohol consumption) and 34,666 (problem drinking) participants.
Alcohol consumption was measured by self-reported consumption, while problem drinking was assessed by the Cut down, Annoyed, Guilt, Eye-opener (CAGE) questionnaire. Information on subsequent DP, including diagnosis for which the DP was awarded, was gathered from the national insurance database. Covariates included somatic illness and symptoms, mental health, health-related behaviour, socio-economic status and social activity.
Those reporting the highest level of alcohol consumption were not at increased risk for DP [hazard ratio (HR) 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.92-1.38], whereas problem drinking was a strong predictor (HR 2.79, 95% CI: 2.08-3.75) compared to their corresponding reference groups. Alcohol abstainers were also at increased risk for DP, but among them, the previous consumers (HR 1.95, 95% CI: 1.48-2.57) and previous excessive consumers (HR 1.67, 95% CI: 1.01-2.74) were at higher risk for DP than constant abstainers.
Problem drinking is linked to subsequent requirement for a disability pension but mere alcohol consumption is not. This is partly explained by 'sick-quitting'.
PubMed ID
21707810 View in PubMed
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The association of health and voluntary early retirement pension and the modifying effect of quality of supervision: Results from a Danish register-based follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283781
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 Jul;45(5):468-475
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Wind
Burr
Pohrt
Hasselhorn
Van der Beek
Rugulies
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 Jul;45(5):468-475
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Employment - organization & administration
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Organization and Administration - standards
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Registries
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aims of this article are to (1) determine whether and to what extent general perceived health and quality of supervision predict voluntary early retirement pension (VERP) and (2) assess whether quality of supervision modifies the association between general perceived health and VERP.
Employees aged 49-64 years who participated in the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study in 2000 were selected. Their questionnaire data about health and work were linked to register data on social transfer payments, among others VERP, from 2001 to 2012 in the Danish Register for Evaluation of Marginalization ( N=1167). Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed to identify the prospective association of general perceived health and quality of supervision on VERP. Relative excess risks due to interaction (RERIs) were calculated to assess whether quality of supervision modified the association between health and VERP.
Employees with poor health at baseline had an increased risk of VERP during follow-up (hazard ratio [HR]=1.23; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-1.49). Quality of supervision at baseline was not associated to VERP during follow-up (HR=1.04; 95% CI 0.90-1.21). There was no statistically significant interaction of poor health and poor quality of supervision with regard to risk of VERP (RERI=-0.33; 95% CI -1.79 to 1.14).
This study did not support the notion that quality of supervision buffers the association between poor health and VERP. Future research is needed to determine whether other aspects of supervision, for example supervisors' opportunities to effectuate workplace adjustments, may modify the association of poor health and VERP.
PubMed ID
28381121 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer and early retirement: Associations with disease characteristics, treatment, comorbidity, social position and participation in a six-day rehabilitation course in a register-based study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137931
Source
Acta Oncol. 2011 Feb;50(2):274-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Lars Henrik Damkjaer
Isabelle Deltour
Nis Palm Suppli
Jane Christensen
Niels T Kroman
Christoffer Johansen
Susanne Oksbjerg Dalton
Author Affiliation
Institute for Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark. damkjaer@cancer.dk
Source
Acta Oncol. 2011 Feb;50(2):274-81
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Algorithms
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - rehabilitation - therapy
Comorbidity
Curriculum
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Patient Education as Topic
Patient Participation
Registries
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Time Factors
Abstract
The purpose of this register-based study was to identify factors related to disease, treatment, sociodemographics and comorbidity associated with taking early retirement among women treated for breast cancer, and to evaluate the risk for taking early retirement among breast cancer survivors who attended a six-day rehabilitation course.
The study population consisted of 856 women who attended the rehabilitation course and a comparison group of 1 805 women who did not attend the course identified through the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group. We obtained information on receipt of unemployment benefits, sickness benefits and early retirement pension for each of the years 1996-2007. Multivariate cox-regression models were used to analyze disease-specific, treatment-related, comorbidity and sociodemographics factors associated with early retirement after breast cancer and to evaluate the effect of attending a rehabilitation course on taking early retirement.
The rate of retirement was higher for women with somatic comorbidity (hazard ratio [HR], 1.91; 95% CI, 1.3; 2.9 for score 1, and HR 1.42; 95% CI, 0.7; 2.7 for score =2), previous depression (HR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.7; 3.2) or having received sickness benefits in the year before their breast cancer diagnosis (HR, 3.75; 95% CI, 1.8; 7.8). Living with a partner was associated with a reduced hazard ratio for taking early retirement (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.5-0.9). Having received chemotherapy, alone or in combination with anti-hormone treatment, reduced the hazard ratio (HR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.3; 0.8 and HR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3; 0.8, respectively). The rate of retirement was higher for women the year after attending the rehabilitation course but returned to unity by three years.
The results of this study contribute to the identification of at-risk women and point to the need for tailored rehabilitation to avoid unnecessary marginalization of breast cancer survivors due to permanent labor market withdrawal.
PubMed ID
21231788 View in PubMed
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Caregiving intensity and retirement status in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104914
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Feb;102:74-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Josephine C Jacobs
Audrey Laporte
Courtney H Van Houtven
Peter C Coyte
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Policy, Management, and Evaluation, University of Toronto, 155 College St., Toronto M5T 3M6, Canada. Electronic address: jo.jacobs@mail.utoronto.ca.
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2014 Feb;102:74-82
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Caregivers - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Home Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Abstract
A number of OECD countries have implemented policies encouraging longer labour force participation in tandem with policies encouraging informal care provision in the community. To better understand how these policies may affect the available pool of caregivers and labour force participants, we need more evidence about how informal caregiving is related to retirement status and timing. We assessed the association between caregiving intensity and retirement status for individuals aged 55 to 69 using the Canadian 2007 General Social Survey, a cross-sectional survey with 23,404 individuals. We used multinomial logistic regressions to determine whether providing different intensities of informal care (i.e. hours of weekly care) was significantly associated with the likelihood that an individual was fully retired, had retired and returned to work, had never retired and was working part-time or full-time, or was a labour market non-participant. We found that higher intensity caregiving was associated with being fully retired (relative to working full-time) for men and women (relative risk ratios, 2.93 and 2.04, respectively). For women, high intensity caregiving was also associated with working part-time (1.84) and being a labour force non-participant (1.99). Male and female high intensity caregivers were more likely to be retired before age 65. Our results highlight the importance of measuring caregiving intensity and multiple paths to retirement, which are often overlooked in the caregiving and retirement literature. They also indicate that a policy context encouraging both later retirement and more informal care may not be reasonable without flexible work arrangement options.
PubMed ID
24565144 View in PubMed
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Challenges and practices in promoting (ageing) employees working career in the health care sector - case studies from Germany, Finland and the UK.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307929
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2019 Nov 29; 19(1):918
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-29-2019
Author
Sebastian Merkel
Mervi Ruokolainen
Daniel Holman
Author Affiliation
Institute for Work and Technology, Westfälische Hochschule, Munscheidstr. 14, 45886, Gelsenkirchen, Germany. merkel@iat.eu.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2019 Nov 29; 19(1):918
Date
Nov-29-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Delivery of Health Care - organization & administration
Finland
Germany
Health Care Sector - organization & administration
Humans
Middle Aged
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling - trends
Personnel Turnover - trends
Qualitative Research
Retirement - statistics & numerical data - trends
United Kingdom
Workforce - organization & administration - trends
Abstract
The health and social care sector (HCS) is currently facing multiple challenges across Europe: against the background of ageing societies, more people are in need of care. Simultaneously, several countries report a lack of skilled personnel. Due to its structural characteristics, including a high share of part-time workers, an ageing workforce, and challenging working conditions, the HCS requires measures and strategies to deal with these challenges.
This qualitative study analyses if and how organisations in three countries (Germany, Finland, and the UK) report similar challenges and how they support longer working careers in the HCS. Therefore, we conducted multiple case studies in care organisations. Altogether 54 semi-structured interviews with employees and representatives of management were carried out and analysed thematically.
Analysis of the interviews revealed that there are similar challenges reported across the countries. Multiple organisational measures and strategies to improve the work ability and working life participation of (ageing) workers were identified. We identified similar challenges across our cases but different strategies in responding to them. With respect to the organisational measures, our results showed that the studied organisations did not implement any age-specific management strategies but realised different reactive and proactive human relation measures aiming at maintaining and improving employees' work ability (i.e., health, competence and motivation) and longer working careers.
Organisations within the HCS tend to focus on the recruitment of younger workers and/or migrant workers to address the current lack of skilled personnel. The idea of explicitly focusing on ageing workers and the concept of age management as a possible solution seems to lack awareness and/or popularity among organisations in the sector. The concept of age management offers a broad range of measures, which could be beneficial for both, employees and employers/organisations. Employees could benefit from a better occupational well-being and more meaningful careers, while employers could benefit from more committed employees with enhanced productivity, work ability and possibly a longer career.
PubMed ID
31783852 View in PubMed
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Common mental disorders and cause-specific disability retirement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262661
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2015 Mar;72(3):181-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
E. Lahelma
O. Pietiläinen
O. Rahkonen
T. Lallukka
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2015 Mar;72(3):181-7
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Disabled Persons - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Common mental disorders are prevalent among employees and may cause work disability. We aimed to examine the association between common mental disorders and disability retirement, with an emphasis on the severity of disorders and diagnostic causes for retirement.
Our data were derived from the Helsinki Health Study cohort on the staff of the City of Helsinki, Finland. The baseline mail surveys were made in 2000-2002 among employees reaching ages 40, 45, 50, 55 and 60 in each year (n=8960, response rate 67%, 80% women). Disability retirement events from national registers (n=628) were followed up by the end of 2010 and linked to the baseline data. After exclusions, the number of participants was 6525. Common mental disorders were measured by the General Health Questionnaire 12-item version (GHQ-12). Covariates at baseline included sociodemographic, work-related and health-related factors. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% CIs were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models.
Common mental disorders showed a graded association with disability retirement. For disability retirement due to any diagnostic cause, the fully adjusted HR for the GHQ-12 score 7-12 was 2.16, 95% CI 1.63 to 2.85. For disability retirement due to mental disorders the corresponding HR was 7.46, 95% CI 4.46 to 12.49. For disability retirement due to musculoskeletal diseases, the association was weaker and did not survive all adjustments.
Common mental disorders are an important antecedent of disability retirement in general and due to mental disorders in particular. Successful measures against common mental disorders may prevent disability retirement due to mental disorders.
PubMed ID
25398414 View in PubMed
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Company-level determinants of disability retirement: a multilevel study of Finnish private sector workplaces.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309345
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2019 12 01; 29(6):1062-1068
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-01-2019
Author
Mikko Laaksonen
Juha Rantala
Jyri Liukko
Anu Polvinen
Jarno Varis
Meeri Kesälä
Susan Kuivalainen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Centre for Pensions (ETK), FI-00065 Eläketurvakeskus, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2019 12 01; 29(6):1062-1068
Date
12-01-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Databases, Factual
Disabled Persons
Eligibility Determination
Female
Finland
Humans
Industry
Male
Middle Aged
Private Sector
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Workplace
Abstract
We examined whether the risk for disability retirement varies between companies over and above the individual-level characteristics of their employees and which company-level characteristics are associated with the risk for any, full or partial disability retirement.
A 30% random sample of Finnish private sector companies with at least 10 employees was used (5567 companies and 301 313 employees). The risk for disability retirement over 6 years was analyzed using multilevel logistic regression. Company size and industry, as well as gender, age, education and social class measured both at the individual- and the company-level were used as explanatory variables.
3.8% of the variance in the risk for disability retirement was attributed to the company level after controlling for individual-level characteristics of the employees. Company-level variance was much larger in partial (11.7%) than in full (4.2%) disability retirement. After controlling for all individual- and company-level characteristics, those working in health and social work activities had increased risk for both full and partial disability retirement. The risk for full disability retirement increased by decreasing educational level of the company. The risk for partial disability retirement increased by increasing company size and was elevated in companies with the highest proportion of women.
After controlling for the individual-level characteristics, variation in the risk for disability retirement between companies was modest. The more substantial variation in partial disability pension suggests that companies have a marked role in advancing working with partial disabilities.
PubMed ID
31329856 View in PubMed
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A comparison of older workers' and retired older people's social capital and sense of mastery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107680
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Dec;41(8):792-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Fredrica Nyqvist
Anna K Forsman
Mima Cattan
Author Affiliation
1National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Mental Health Promotion Unit, Vaasa, Finland.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Dec;41(8):792-8
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Residence Characteristics
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Social Identification
Social Support
Trust
Abstract
To assess if older people with higher levels of social capital experience higher levels of sense of mastery than those with lower levels of social capital and to assess whether this association is stronger for retired older people than for older workers.
The data originates from a general population mental health survey conducted among 2610 older people (50 years of age or older) in Finland in 2011. The response rate was 57.1%. The association between sense of mastery, measured by Pearlin's Sense of Mastery Scale, and social capital, measured by social networks, organisational activities, trust, and sense of belonging, were tested by logistic regression analyses.
The results showed that older workers experienced greater sense of mastery than retired older people. Trust and neighbourhood belonging were positively associated with sense of mastery.
Inequalities in mental wellbeing between older people included in or excluded from the workforce are a public health challenge. Our findings imply that social capital needs to be prioritised as a means for enhancing mental health. More attention should be paid to promote mental wellbeing in retired older people.
PubMed ID
23985725 View in PubMed
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93 records – page 1 of 10.