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66 records – page 1 of 7.

Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1997;23 Suppl 1:27-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
J. Seitsamo
M. Klockars
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1997;23 Suppl 1:27-35
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging - psychology
Attitude to Health
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Fitness - psychology
Retirement - psychology
Sick Role
Work Capacity Evaluation
Abstract
The study explored changes in the health of aging workers from 1981 to 1992.
Municipal workers [age 55 to 69 (mean 61.6) years in 1992] who filled out questionnaires in both 1981 and 1992 (N = 4534) were studied. The changes in disease prevalence and perceived health were tested with Pearson's chi-square independence test. Improvement and decline in perceived health were analyzed by logistic regression models.
In 1992, significantly more diseases were reported than in 1981; the musculoskeletal disease rate rose from 38% in 1981 to 53% in 1992 for the women and from 35% to 49% for the men and the cardiovascular disease rate rose from 15% in 1981 to 28% in 1992 for the women and from 19% to 37% for the men. The age differences diminished during the follow-up. Self-assessed health improved in all the age groups among both those still working in 1992 and those retired. The association between illnesses and perceived health changed during the follow-up, 11% of those with no diseases experiencing their health as good in 1981 and over 40% in 1992. The most important factors explaining the improvement appeared to be a low number of physical illnesses and the absence of cardiovascular and musculoskeletal disease. Nonphysical work, frequent physical exercise, and satisfaction with life situation were also significant contributors to good perceived health.
The improvement in perceived health during the follow-up may mean that older people have lower criteria for good perceived health than younger people do. The associations between self-assessed health and the presence of disease need further study.
PubMed ID
9247993 View in PubMed
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All well at work? Evaluation of workplace-based early rehabilitation in the Finnish State administration.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193244
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2001 Sep;24(3):171-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
I. Väänänen-Tomppo
E. Janatuinen
R. Törnqvist
Author Affiliation
State Treasury, Helsinki, Finland. irma.vaananen-tomppo@valtiokont-tori.fi
Source
Int J Rehabil Res. 2001 Sep;24(3):171-80
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Occupational Diseases - mortality - rehabilitation
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care)
Questionnaires
Retirement - psychology
Time Factors
Abstract
A comprehensive system for the early rehabilitation of personnel has been developed and practised within the Finnish State administration since 1989. The rehabilitation process can be initiated as soon as the working capacity of a person or work community is threatened but is not yet seriously impaired. Rehabilitation is principally carried out on an outpatient basis alongside ordinary work. The aim of the study was to evaluate the outcomes and processes of early rehabilitation. The research data comprised several thousands of cases and consisted of a cross-sectional and a follow-up survey and a register-based follow-up. The surveys showed that during the rehabilitation period the average performance of the participants began to match that of the better-off non-participants, especially with respect to their general working capacity, mental well-being and occurrence of musculoskeletal problems. The sense of coherence rose in both groups, which can be partly attributed to positive changes in the workplace. In the group process, there also proved to be many factors contributing to achievement of the participants' rehabilitation objectives. The register-based follow-up showed that rehabilitation had a positive effect on average longer-term morbidity. In the cases of early retirement, the average retirement age of early rehabilitation participants was considerably higher than the average for the State sector as a whole. A system of outpatient early rehabilitation, where the rehabilitation programme and the development of working circumstances progress side by side, proved to give encouraging results at very moderate cost.
PubMed ID
11560232 View in PubMed
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Anticipating retirement: the formation of narratives concerning an occupational transition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210312
Source
Am J Occup Ther. 1997 Jan;51(1):49-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
H. Jonsson
G. Kielhofner
L. Borell
Author Affiliation
Stockholm University College of Health Sciences, Solna, Sweden.
Source
Am J Occup Ther. 1997 Jan;51(1):49-56
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Job Satisfaction
Life Change Events
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Retirement - psychology
Social Values
Sweden
Abstract
This study is the first part of a longitudinal investigation of the retirement process. This stage of the inquiry concerned how older persons anticipate their retirement.
Thirty-two workers were randomly selected from all workers age 63 years in a suburb of Stockholm. They participated in semistructured interviews about their work and their expectations for retirement.
The participants narratives illustrated the complex work of interpreting the past and expected meaning in one's occupational life. The narratives, which anticipated widely different future trajectories, revealed many of the challenges and dilemmas of anticipating retirement and the close association of work experience to expectations for retirement. In particular, the narratives highlighted the participants' concerns about maintaining the quality of experience in activity. The findings also demonstrate the process by which persons anticipate and make choices about life change.
People anticipate retirement through volitional narratives in which they link together past, present, and future. Understanding this volitional process of interpreting, anticipating, and making choices is important to understanding how people adapt to life changes.
PubMed ID
8978863 View in PubMed
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The association between psychosocial work environment, attitudes towards older workers (ageism) and planned retirement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132314
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2012 May;85(4):437-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Sannie Thorsen
Reiner Rugulies
Katja Løngaard
Vilhelm Borg
Karsten Thielen
Jakob Bue Bjorner
Author Affiliation
The National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø parkallé 105, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. svt@nrcwe.dk
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2012 May;85(4):437-45
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Ageism
Attitude
Career Mobility
Denmark
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Psychology
Questionnaires
Retirement - psychology
Work - psychology
Workload - psychology
Workplace
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the association between psychosocial factors (in particular ageism) at the workplace and older workers' retirement plans, while taking health and workability of the employee into account.
In the fall and winter of 2008, self-report data on work environment, health, workability and retirement plans were collected in a representative national sample (n = 3,122) of Danish employees 50 years or older. Ordinal logistic regression was used to analyse associations in a cross-sectional design. Predictor variables were standardized.
In analyses adjusted for socio-demography, socio-economy, health, workability and work performance, 4 out of 6 examined psychosocial factors (ageism, lack of recognition, lack of development possibilities, lack of predictability) were significantly associated with plans of early retirement (OR: 1.10-1.13). Stratified on gender, three psychosocial factors (ageism, lack of recognition, lack of development possibilities) remained significant for men (OR: 1.15-1.25) and none for women. In particular was the association between retirement plans and ageism highly significant in the male subgroup, but no association was found in the female subgroup.
Ageism, lack of recognition and lack of development possibilities are associated with older male workers' retirement plans in our analyses. Workability has the strongest association with retirement plans for both genders.
PubMed ID
21830146 View in PubMed
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At the threshold of retirement: From all-absorbing relations to self-actualization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291504
Source
J Women Aging. 2017 Oct-Dec; 29(4):306-320
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Anna Lund
Author Affiliation
a Centre for Cultural Sociology, Department of Cultural Sciences , Linnaeus University , Växjö , Sweden.
Source
J Women Aging. 2017 Oct-Dec; 29(4):306-320
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Life Style
Personal Satisfaction
Retirement - psychology
Self Concept
Social Perception
Sweden
Women, Working - psychology
Abstract
To investigate the complexities of the retirement process, the present article draws on a case study of Eva, a Swedish woman who "awakened" from all-absorbing relations. It considers the ways in which retirement can enable liberation from patriarchal kinship structures and embodied values of respectability. The aim is to illuminate how deep, embodied values can become conscious and explicit during precarious life situations and transitional phases. The relation between the Swedish welfare state, an I-we balance, and gender equity values are illuminated. These analytical dimensions support the analysis by providing insights into the ways in which individuals embody and use cultural and social structures when they aim to manage unpredictability and to create change toward self-actualization.
PubMed ID
27716020 View in PubMed
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Can Self-Enhancement Values Predict Retirement Behavior? An Analysis Combining Survey and Register Data From Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267521
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 2015 Jan;80(2):101-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2015
Author
Morten Blekesaune
Source
Int J Aging Hum Dev. 2015 Jan;80(2):101-14
Date
Jan-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Aged
Disabled Persons
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Philosophy
Power (Psychology)
Questionnaires
Registries
Retirement - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Self Concept
Social Values
Abstract
This analysis investigates to what extent the self-enhancement values in the Schwartz taxonomy-achievement, power, and hedonism-can predict retirement behavior. Self-enhancement values were measured using the Norwegian Life Course, Generations and Gender Study beginning in 2007. Register data were merged with the survey data to identify those collecting a pension by the end of 2010; these persons were defined as being retired. Statistical analysis was performed using discrete time proportional odds (logistic regression) duration models for each birthday. The results show that two self-enhancement values, achievement and hedonism, discourage disability retirement but do not affect nondisability retirement. These results are largely consistent across statistical models controlling or not controlling for other known predictors of retirement behavior, including education and income, occupational group (class), and health. The hedonism effect is partially associated with the fact that individuals holding hedonistic values are in good health.
PubMed ID
26243324 View in PubMed
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Changes in health-related quality of life by occupational status among women diagnosed with breast cancer--a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267467
Source
Psychooncology. 2013 Oct;22(10):2321-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Marie Høyer Lundh
Claudia Lampic
Karin Nordin
Johan Ahlgren
Leif Bergkvist
Mats Lambe
Anders Berglund
Birgitta Johansson
Source
Psychooncology. 2013 Oct;22(10):2321-31
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - psychology
Cohort Studies
Employment - psychology
Female
Health status
Humans
Middle Aged
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Retirement - psychology
Return to Work - psychology
Sick Leave
Sweden
Abstract
To investigate whether longitudinal changes in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among breast cancer patients vary by prediagnosis occupational status or postdiagnosis changes in working time.
We identified 1573 patients in the Breast Cancer Quality Register of Central Sweden and asked them to participate in a longitudinal questionnaire study. A total of n?=?841 women completed three questionnaires within a mean time of 4, 16, and 38?months postdiagnosis. Generalized estimating equation models were used to examine changes in European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire and the Breast Cancer-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire subscales stratified by prediagnosis occupational status and postdiagnosis changes in working time.
Over time, the proportion of employed women reporting good functioning increased more, and the proportion reporting a high level of symptoms decreased more compared with women on sick leave/disability pension and retirement pensioners (p?
PubMed ID
23585294 View in PubMed
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Changes in physical and mental health functioning during retirement transition: a register-linkage follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300387
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 10 01; 28(5):805-809
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-01-2018
Author
Minna Mänty
Anne Kouvonen
Tea Lallukka
Jouni Lahti
Eero Lahelma
Ossi Rahkonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2018 10 01; 28(5):805-809
Date
10-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Employment - psychology
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Leisure Activities - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Retirement - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Changes in health functioning over different retirement transitions are poorly understood. This study aimed to examine associations between transition into statutory, disability and part-time retirement, and changes in health functioning.
Survey data were collected among ageing employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland, at three phases: (i) (2000-02), (ii) (2007) and (iii) (2012). Physical and mental health functioning were measured using the Short-Form 36 questionnaire at each phase. Retirees between phases 1 and 3 were identified from the national registers of the Finnish Centre for Pensions: full-time statutory retirement (n = 1464), part-time retirement (n = 404), and disability retirement (n = 462). Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the associations.
Disability retirees had poorer pre- and post-retirement health functioning compared to statutory and part-time retirees. Statutory and part-time retirement were associated with no or only small changes in physical health functioning during retirement transition (ß 0.1, 95% CI -0.3 to 0.5 and -1.0, -1.8 to -0.1, respectively), whereas a clear decline in functioning was observed among disability retirees (-4.3, -5.4 to -3.2). Mental health functioning improved during the retirement transition among statutory and part-time retirees (1.9, 1.4-2.4 and 2.0, 1.0-3.0, respectively), whereas no change was observed for disability retirees.
Transition to disability retirement led to a decrease in physical health functioning, and statutory retirement to a slight improvement in mental health functioning. Evidence on changes in physical and mental health functioning during retirement transition process may provide useful information for interventions to promote healthy ageing.
PubMed ID
29425301 View in PubMed
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Changes in Sleep Difficulties During the Transition to Statutory Retirement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300977
Source
Sleep. 2018 01 01; 41(1):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-01-2018
Author
Saana Myllyntausta
Paula Salo
Erkki Kronholm
Jaana Pentti
Mika Kivimäki
Jussi Vahtera
Sari Stenholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
Sleep. 2018 01 01; 41(1):
Date
01-01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Employment - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Public Sector
Retirement - psychology
Sleep - physiology
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Abstract
This study examined changes in sleep during the transition from full-time work to statutory retirement. Both the prevalence of any sleep difficulty and the prevalence of specific sleep difficulties, such as difficulties falling asleep, difficulties maintaining sleep, waking up too early in the morning, and nonrestorative sleep, were examined.
Data from the Finnish Public Sector study were used. The study population consisted of 5,807 Finnish public sector employees who retired on statutory basis between 2000 and 2011. The participants responded on the Jenkins Sleep Problem Scale Questionnaire before and after retirement in surveys conducted every 4 years.
At the last study wave before retirement, 30% of the participants had sleep difficulties. Prevalence of any sleep difficulty decreased during the retirement transition: the risk ratio (RR) for having sleep difficulties in the first study wave following retirement compared with the last study wave preceding retirement was 0.89 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.85-0.94). During the retirement transition, both waking up too early in the morning (RR = 0.76, 95% CI 0.69-0.82) and nonrestorative sleep (RR = 0.47, 95% CI 0.42-0.53) decreased, whereas there was no change in difficulties falling asleep or difficulties maintaining sleep. The decreases in sleep difficulties occurred primarily among those with psychological distress, suboptimal self-rated health, short sleep duration, and job strain before retirement.
These longitudinal data suggest that transition to statutory retirement is associated with a decrease in sleep difficulties, especially waking up too early in the morning and nonrestorative sleep.
PubMed ID
29155955 View in PubMed
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66 records – page 1 of 7.