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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Age discrimination and early retirement policies: a comparison of labor market regulation in Canada and the United States.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216701
Source
J Aging Soc Policy. 1995;7(1):85-102
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
C T Gillin
T R Klassen
Author Affiliation
Department of Sociology, Ryerson Polytechnical University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. TGILLIN@hermes.acs.ryerson.ca
Source
J Aging Soc Policy. 1995;7(1):85-102
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Humans
Prejudice
Public Policy
Retirement - legislation & jurisprudence
United States
Abstract
As public policy issues, mandatory retirement and age discrimination are approached differently in Canada and the United States. The legal frameworks, enforcement procedures, and judicial decisions are distinct in the two jurisdictions. The United States, unlike Canada, has specific legislation to protect the rights of older workers, and has a centralized enforcement system. The differences between the two countries are accounted for by the greater emphasis on individual rights in the United States and on communitarianism in Canada. The different policy choices of each society highlight the tensions inherent in North American labor markets. The United States seems to be in a better position to shift toward a labor-management policy which encourages older workers to remain in the workforce.
PubMed ID
10183209 View in PubMed
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[Discriminating age limits for physicians]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93241
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 May 1;128(9):1075
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2008
Author
Hansen Egill
Pahle Jan A
Author Affiliation
Eiksmarka.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 May 1;128(9):1075
Date
May-1-2008
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Humans
Licensure, Medical - legislation & jurisprudence
Norway
Physicians
Prejudice
Retirement - legislation & jurisprudence
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2008 Jun 26;128(13):1545-6; author reply 154618587466
PubMed ID
18451901 View in PubMed
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Editorial: neglecting elders in the workplace: civil society organizations, ageism, and mandatory retirement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167318
Source
Can J Aging. 2006;25(3):243-6, 247-251
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006

[Increased elimination from the labor market: sick-listing and early retirement rules vary greatly in various occupations]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73790
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Jan 24;87(4):179, 182-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-24-1990
Author
F. Diderichsen
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Vårdcentralen Kronan, Sundbyberg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1990 Jan 24;87(4):179, 182-4
Date
Jan-24-1990
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Female
Humans
Insurance, Health
Male
Morbidity
Occupational Medicine
Retirement - legislation & jurisprudence
Sweden
PubMed ID
2299924 View in PubMed
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Physical workload and thoughts of retirement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127197
Source
Work. 2012;41 Suppl 1:303-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Merja Perkiö-Mäkelä
Maria Hirvonen
Author Affiliation
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Kuopio, Neulaniementie 4, Kuopio, Finland. merja.perkio-makela@ttl.fi
Source
Work. 2012;41 Suppl 1:303-6
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Female
Finland
Humans
Intention
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Exertion
Questionnaires
Retirement - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Workload - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this paper is to present Finnish employees' opinions on continuing work until retirement pension and after the age of 63, and to find out if physical workload is related to these opinions. Altogether 39% of men and 40% of women had never had thoughts of early retirement, and 59% claimed (both men and women) that they would consider working beyond the age of 63. Own health (20%); financial gain such as salary and better pension (19%); meaningful, interesting and challenging work (15%); flexible working hours or part-time work (13%); lighter work load (13%); good work community (8%); and good work environment (6%) were stated as factors affecting the decision to continue working after the age of 63. Employees whose work involved low physical workload had less thoughts of early retirement and had considered continuing work after the age of 63 more often than those whose work involved high physical loads. Own health in particular was stated as a reason to consider continuing work by employees whose work was physically demanding.
PubMed ID
22316739 View in PubMed
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Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 May 29;123(11):1567
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-29-2003
Author
Harald Berg
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 May 29;123(11):1567
Date
May-29-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Humans
Licensure, Medical - legislation & jurisprudence
Norway
Pensions
Physicians
Retirement - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
12822028 View in PubMed
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Probing the future of mandatory retirement in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168466
Source
Can J Aging. 2006;25(2):161-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Peter Ibbott
Don Kerr
Roderic Beaujot
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, King's University College at the University of Western Ontario, 266 Epworth Avenue, London, ON, N6A 2M3, Canada. pibbott@uwo.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2006;25(2):161-78
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Canada
Demography
Humans
Public Policy
Retirement - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The future of mandatory retirement is at least partly driven by changing demographics. In Canada, these demographics include slowing population growth, rapid aging, declining rates of labour force participation, and slowing labour force growth. After reviewing the demographic trends and considering alternate scenarios in labour force participation, we consider the determinants of early departures from the labour force and suggest scenarios that might reverse these trends. With a decline in labour force entrants, delays in early life transitions, and possible reductions in retirement benefits, a trend to retire later would bring mandatory retirement into question.
PubMed ID
16821199 View in PubMed
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Source
Health Care Women Int. 1991 Apr-Jun;12(2):v-vi
Publication Type
Article
Author
P N Stern
Source
Health Care Women Int. 1991 Apr-Jun;12(2):v-vi
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Faculty, Nursing
Female
Humans
Nursing Research
Prejudice
Retirement - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
2022525 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Dec;21(14):1263
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Paul Malik
Author Affiliation
Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario. pgmalik@hotmail.com
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2005 Dec;21(14):1263
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Decision Making
Female
Human Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Life expectancy
Male
Pensions
Prejudice
Retirement - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
PubMed ID
16440488 View in PubMed
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Supreme Court's VGH ruling looms, but so may other manpower battles.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103218
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Feb 1;142(3):248-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-1990

11 records – page 1 of 2.