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17 records – page 1 of 2.

An outbreak of Bacillus cereus implicating a part-time banquet caterer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188374
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Sep-Oct;93(5):353-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Colette Gaulin
Yv Bonnier Viger
Lise Fillion
Author Affiliation
Centre de santé publique de Québec, 2400 rue d'Estimauville, Beauport, Québec, G1E 7G9. colette.gaulin@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Sep-Oct;93(5):353-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacillus cereus - isolation & purification
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Cohort Studies
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Food Contamination
Food Services - standards
Foodborne Diseases - microbiology
Humans
Quebec - epidemiology
Restaurants - standards
Sanitation
Abstract
In the aftermath of a party, 70% (25 of 36) of attendees had gastroenteritis. The objectives of this study were to identify a risk factor associated with the food during the banquet and to identify measures of control for avoiding this kind of outbreak in the future.
A retrospective cohort study was used. We tried to reach by telephone all guests who had attended this banquet. A standardized questionnaire was used to provide information about identification of a risk factor, especially in relation to food.
The cohort study has shown that potato salad served at the party was significantly associated with the disease. The mayonnaise used to prepare the salad was analyzed and Bacillus cereus was isolated (10(3) bacteria per gram).
Bacillus microorganisms are usually found in decaying organic matter, dust, soil, vegetables and water. The bacteria has a remarkable ability to survive strong environmental stresses. There are strains of B. cereus that can cause food poisoning episodes with infective doses as low as 10(3) to 10(4) bacteria per gram. B. cereus is an infrequently reported cause of foodborne illnesses in Quebec and in North America but this may be due to underreporting of episodes. In this outbreak, bacterial multiplication was facilitated at several points in the interval between the preparation of the meal and the consumption of the banquet by the guests. Because the spores are ubiquitous and resistant to inactivation with most food grade disinfectants, temperature control should be the main focus of B. cereus outbreak prevention.
The meal was prepared by a restaurateur who was inexperienced in catering services and temperature control in particular when food is served outside the restaurant. This outbreak underscores the importance of maintaining meticulous hygienic procedures in food processing. Restaurateurs who offer catering services should be familiar with the constraints that are specific to this sector of the food industry.
PubMed ID
12353456 View in PubMed
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Eat Smart! Ontario's Healthy Restaurant Program: a survey of participating restaurant operators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182386
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2003;64(4):202-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Lesley A Macaskill
John J M Dwyer
Connie L Uetrecht
Carol Dombrow
Author Affiliation
Toronto Public Health, ON.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2003;64(4):202-7
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Product Safety
Consumer Satisfaction
Health Food
Health Promotion - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Ontario
Restaurants - standards
Smoking
Abstract
Eat Smart! Ontario's Healthy Restaurant Program is a standard provincial health promotion program. Public health units grant an award of excellence to restaurants that meet designated standards in nutrition, food safety, and non-smoking seating. The purpose of this study was to assess whether program objectives for participating restaurant operators were achieved during the first year of program implementation, and to obtain operators' recommendations for improving the program. Dillman's tailored design method was used to design a mail survey and implement it among participating operators (n = 434). The design method, which consisted of four mail-outs, yielded a 74% response rate. Fifty percent of respondents operated family-style or quick-service restaurants, and 82% of respondents learned about the program from public health inspectors. Almost all respondents (98%) participated in the program mainly to have their establishments known as clean and healthy restaurants, 65% received and used either point-of-purchase table stands or postcards to promote the program, and 98% planned to continue participating. The respondents' suggestions for improving the program were related to the award ceremony and program materials, media promotion, communication, education, and program standards. Program staff can use the findings to enhance the program.
PubMed ID
14675501 View in PubMed
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Eat Smart! Ontario's Healthy Restaurant Program: focus groups with non-participating restaurant operators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181240
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2004;65(1):6-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
John J M Dwyer
Lesley A Macaskill
Connie L Uetrecht
Carol Dombrow
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, College of Social and Applied Human Sciences, University of Guelph, ON.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2004;65(1):6-9
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Product Safety
Focus Groups
Health Promotion - methods - standards
Humans
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Ontario
Public Health
Restaurants - standards
Smoking
Abstract
Eat Smart! Ontario's Healthy Restaurant Program is a standard provincial health promotion program. Public health units give an award of excellence to restaurants that meet nutrition, food safety, and non-smoking seating standards. The purpose of this study was to determine why some restaurant operators have not applied to participate in the program, and how to get them to apply. Four focus group interviews were conducted with 35 operators who didn't apply to participate. The analysis of responses yielded various themes. The participants' perceived barriers to participation were misunderstandings about how to qualify for the program, lack of time, concern about different non-smoking bylaw requirements, and potential loss of revenue. Their perceived facilitators to participation were convenience of applying to participate, franchise executives' approval to participate, a 100% non-smoking bylaw, flexibility in the assessment of restaurants, the opportunity for positive advertising, alternative payment for food handler training, and customer demand. Program staff can use the findings to develop and use strategies to encourage participation.
PubMed ID
15005860 View in PubMed
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The effects of inspection frequency and food handler education on restaurant inspection violations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216453
Source
Can J Public Health. 1995 Jan-Feb;86(1):46-50
Publication Type
Article
Author
R G Mathias
R. Sizto
A. Hazlewood
W. Cocksedge
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1995 Jan-Feb;86(1):46-50
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Educational Status
Food Handling - standards
Food Inspection - methods
Health Education - standards
Humans
Public Health Administration
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Restaurants - standards
Time Factors
Abstract
The effectiveness of restaurant inspections and food handler education are not known. Consequently, the optimal frequency of neither has been determined. Thirty randomly selected restaurants from seven health units in three provinces were inspected by one of three senior inspectors. A questionnaire was used to collect the data. The violation score worsened when the time since last inspection was greater than 12 months, but did not worsen when the interval was shorter. Those restaurants in which supervisors and food handlers had completed food handler education courses had better inspection scores than those without. Restaurants whose food handlers had food service education had better scores only for time and temperature violations. These outcomes were all significant in a multiple regression model. The duration of most education courses was under five days. The time since the last food service education course was not significant. Routine inspections should be done yearly. Food service education should be offered to both supervisors and food handlers.
PubMed ID
7728716 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of a HACCP pilot program for the food service industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176822
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Nov-Dec;95(6):470-2
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tom Abernathy
Robert Hart
Author Affiliation
Central West Health Planning Information Network, Hamilton, ON. toma@cwhpin.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2004 Nov-Dec;95(6):470-2
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Food Contamination - prevention & control
Food Handling - methods - standards
Humans
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Restaurants - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To evaluate the efficacy and applicability of a HACCP-based program for use in restaurants.
A randomly selected sample of 16 intervention and 42 control full service, "stand-alone" restaurants with a minimum of 3 full-time food handling staff on duty per shift.
Six communities in Central West Ontario.
The Critical Approach, a HACCP-based program for use in restaurants, was designed in consultation with health inspectors and restaurant operators. It focusses on generic risk factors (Critical Control Points, CCPs) for food handlers rather than assessing specific menu items or foods; offers appropriate training of both management and staff; and encourages self-monitoring of CCPs by operators without extensive record keeping or retention.
Outcome indicators measured changes in three areas: the environment, knowledge, and behaviour.
Results suggest that among a subpopulation of restaurants, the program is acceptable to operators and capable of producing tangible results. Principles and methods of the program (i.e., an initial assessment of the site, working with the operator to identify and suggest improvements, and return visits to monitor compliance) may be transferable to other types of food service operations.
PubMed ID
15622800 View in PubMed
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The evaluation of the effectiveness of routine restaurant inspections and education of food handlers: restaurant inspection survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217818
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Jul-Aug;85 Suppl 1:S61-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
R G Mathias
P D Riben
E. Campbell
M. Wiens
W. Cocksedge
A. Hazlewood
B. Kirshner
J. Pelton
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care & Epidemiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Jul-Aug;85 Suppl 1:S61-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Food Contamination - prevention & control
Food Handling
Humans
Inservice Training - standards
Public Health - standards
Restaurants - standards
Abstract
To determine restaurant inspection and food handler education practices in Canada, a survey of 141 jurisdictions was conducted. The response rate was 100%. All jurisdictions inspected restaurants, but the frequency of routine inspection varied from none to six or more times per year. The frequency of violations found on routine inspection was associated with foodborne illness. However, the frequency of inspection was not correlated with disease or with violations. Food handler education courses were mandatory in 32% of jurisdictions. Most courses were one to two days. No correlation was found between the numbers of individuals trained in the past year and violations or reported foodborne disease. This lack of reduction in reported foodborne illness may be due to the ecological nature of the survey or to the lack of effectiveness of food handler education or of routine restaurant inspections in reducing violations.
PubMed ID
7987762 View in PubMed
Less detail

Evaluation of the effect of frequency of inspection on the sanitary conditions of eating establishments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature239903
Source
Can J Public Health. 1984 Nov-Dec;75(6):434-8
Publication Type
Article

Fast food and deprivation in Nova Scotia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152244
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jan-Feb;100(1):32-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jennifer Jones
Mikiko Terashima
Daniel Rainham
Author Affiliation
Environmental Programmes, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2009 Jan-Feb;100(1):32-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Censuses
Databases, Factual
Environment Design - economics
Female
Food Habits - classification - psychology
Geographic Information Systems
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Maps as Topic
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Overweight - economics - epidemiology - etiology
Poverty Areas
Prevalence
Public Health Informatics
Residence Characteristics - classification - statistics & numerical data
Restaurants - standards - statistics & numerical data
Rural Health
Urban health
Vulnerable Populations - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the relationship between density of fast food restaurants and measures of social and material deprivation at the community level in Nova Scotia, Canada.
Census information on population and key variables required for the calculation of deprivation indices were obtained for 266 communities in Nova Scotia. The density of fast food restaurants per 1000 individuals for each community was calculated and communities were divided into quintiles of material and psychosocial deprivation. One-way analysis of variance was used to investigate associations between fast food outlet densities and deprivation scores at the community level.
A statistically significant inverse association was found between community-level material deprivation and the mean number of fast food restaurants per 1000 people for Nova Scotia (p
PubMed ID
19263973 View in PubMed
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Formative evaluation of an Inspection Certificate Program (ICP) pilot in Toronto.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201554
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 May-Jun;90(3):209-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
J J Dwyer
C. Komorowski
F. Ruf
Author Affiliation
Toronto Public Health Department, North York Civic Centre, ON. thu-jd@city.north-york.on.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 1999 May-Jun;90(3):209-12
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation - organization & administration
Food Inspection - methods - standards
Humans
Inservice Training - organization & administration
Ontario
Pilot Projects
Restaurants - standards
Total Quality Management - organization & administration
Truth Disclosure
Urban health
Abstract
The inspection certificate program consists of food establishments voluntarily posting a certificate to inform patrons that inspection reports can be accessed from operators or the public health department. A three-month pilot program was evaluated for program improvement purposes. Only 65% of the selected operators were willing to participate, which suggests a challenge to fully implementing the program. Thirty-nine randomly selected restaurant operators participated. Most operators posted the certificate at the front entrance, and patrons indicated that reports were clear. Operators were supportive of the program. Some operators reported that the program was good for business and offered suggestions to improve it. A total of 583 requests for reports were made which suggests that the program empowered patrons to request reports, mostly from operators. Most patron evaluation forms came from a few operators that had no deficiencies, which limits generalizability.
PubMed ID
10401175 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.