Skip header and navigation

Refine By

177 records – page 1 of 18.

Actual and perceived impacts of tobacco regulation on restaurants and firms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195581
Source
Tob Control. 2001 Mar;10(1):33-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001
Author
P Y Crémieux
P. Ouellette
Author Affiliation
Department of Economics, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada. pcremieux@analysisgroup.com
Source
Tob Control. 2001 Mar;10(1):33-7
Date
Mar-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Health promotion
Humans
Quebec - epidemiology
Restaurants - economics
Smoking - economics - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking Cessation - economics
Workplace
Abstract
To examine the actual and anticipated costs of a law regulating workplace smoking and smoking in restaurants, taking into consideration observed and anticipated infrastructure costs, lost productivity, increased absenteeism, and loss of clientele.
A survey of 401 Québec restaurants and 600 Québec firms conducted by the Québec Ministry of Health before the enactment of the law was used to derive costs incurred by those who had already complied and anticipated by those that did not.
Direct and indirect costs associated with tobacco regulation at work and in restaurants were minimal. Annualised infrastructure costs amounted to less than 0.0002% of firm revenues and 0.15% of restaurant revenues. Anticipated costs were larger and amounted to 0.0004% of firm revenues and 0.41% of restaurant revenues. Impacts on productivity, absenteeism, and restaurant patronage were widely anticipated but not observed in currently compliant establishments.
Firms and restaurants expected high costs to result from strict tobacco regulation because of infrastructure costs, decreased productivity, and decreased patronage. That none of these were actually observed suggests that policy makers should discount industry claims that smoking regulations impose undue economic hardship.
Notes
Cites: Tob Control. 1999 Autumn;8(3):272-710599571
Cites: Tob Control. 1999 Spring;8(1):62-610465818
Cites: Circulation. 1992 Aug;86(2):699-7021638735
Cites: JAMA. 1993 Jul 28;270(4):479-868320788
Cites: JAMA. 1993 Jul 28;270(4):490-38320789
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1993 Sep;83(9):1284-88363005
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1994 Jul;84(7):1081-58017529
Cites: J Am Coll Cardiol. 1994 Aug;24(2):546-548034894
Cites: MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1995 May 19;44(19):370-27739510
Cites: CMAJ. 1997 Jan 15;156(2):187-919012719
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 1997;18:163-859143716
Cites: Tob Control. 1997;6 Suppl 2:S44-89583652
Cites: Am J Health Promot. 1998 Nov-Dec;13(2):83-10410346662
Cites: J Public Health Manag Pract. 1999 Jan;5(1):22-710345509
Cites: J Public Health Manag Pract. 1999 Jan;5(1):37-4210345511
Cites: J Public Health Manag Pract. 1999 Jan;5(1):43-5210345512
Cites: J Public Health Manag Pract. 1999 Jan;5(1):53-6210345513
Cites: JAMA. 1999 May 26;281(20):1911-810349895
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 1999 Dec;107 Suppl 6:865-7210592144
PubMed ID
11226358 View in PubMed
Less detail

Affected in the nightclub. A case study of regular clubbers' conflictual practices in nightclubs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113967
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2013 May;24(3):196-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Jakob Demant
Author Affiliation
Aarhus University, Centre for Alcohol and Drug Research, Denmark. jd@crf.au.dk
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2013 May;24(3):196-202
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Conflict (Psychology)
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Music
Philosophy
Psychological Theory
Restaurants
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The nightclub as a space is presented as a free and hedonistic place for pleasure. This space is also part of a wider socio-spatial-economic framework in which various forms of regulation apply to clubbers and the cultivation of affects. This paper researches marginal and contested forms of experiences within a club as a way of understanding the complexities of pleasure. The study does so by addressing experiences through the concept of affects, which is situated within a framework of a non-representational theory of space. Anxiety, pride, anger, shame and embarrassment are embodied simultaneously with the affects of love, joy, sympathy and so on. Alcohol, illicit drugs, bouncers, music and other human or non-human actants are part of the place. It is within this heterogeneous assemblage that affects become embodied. The data consists of 273 cases from a large Copenhagen nightclub where guests have complained about being rejected or being given quarantine. The paper suggests that if the space of the club is approached as being more than a mono-affectual space of either risk or pleasure, then it would be possible to reduce conflicts and produce more inclusive spaces.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Drug Policy. 2013 May;24(3):167-7223352332
PubMed ID
23664721 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airborne exposure and biological monitoring of bar and restaurant workers before and after the introduction of a smoking ban.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82661
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Mar;8(3):362-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Ellingsen Dag G
Fladseth Geir
Daae Hanne L
Gjølstad Merete
Kjaerheim Kristina
Skogstad Marit
Olsen Raymond
Thorud Syvert
Molander Paal
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Occupational Health, P.O. Box 8149 Dep, N-0033, Oslo, Norway. dag.ellingsen@stami.no
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Mar;8(3):362-8
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Chromatography, High Pressure Liquid
Cotinine - urine
Dust - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nicotine - analysis
Norway
Occupational Exposure - analysis
Public Facilities - legislation & jurisprudence
Restaurants
Smoking - legislation & jurisprudence
Time Factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - analysis - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The aims were to assess the impact of a total smoking ban on the level of airborne contaminants and the urinary cotinine levels in the employees in bars and restaurants. In a follow up design, 13 bars and restaurants were visited before and after the implementation of a smoking ban. Ninety-three employees in the establishments were initially included into the study. The arithmetic mean concentration of nicotine and total dust declined from 28.3 microg m(-3) (range, 0.4-88.0) and 262 microg m(-3) (range, 52-662), respectively, to 0.6 microg m(-3) (range, not detected-3.7) and 77 microg m(-3) (range, not detected-261) after the smoking ban. The Pearson correlation coefficient between airborne nicotine and total dust was 0.86 (p
PubMed ID
16528420 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol and drug use among staff at licensed premises in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300214
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Jun; 47(4):393-399
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jun-2019
Author
Kristin Buvik
Elin K Bye
Johanna Gripenberg
Author Affiliation
1 Department of of Alcohol, Tobacco and Drugs, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Norway.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2019 Jun; 47(4):393-399
Date
Jun-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Licensure - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Restaurants - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Self Report
Street Drugs
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
There is increased concern about the use of alcohol and illicit drugs in nightlife settings. Most studies of substance use in nightlife settings are from the patrons' perspective, which leaves an understudied population - the nightclub staff. The aim of this paper is to study self-reported alcohol and substance use among staff at licensed premises in Norway: types of illicit drugs used, attitudes towards drugs, and observed drug use among patrons.
A survey was conducted at server-training courses in 20 different cities in Norway during 2015. The survey included: demographics, respondents' own alcohol and drug experience, attitudes towards drug use, and observed drug use among patrons at licensed premises.
Data were collected from 912 staff working at licensed premises. A majority reported alcohol use in the past year, and 61% reported alcohol use two or more times a month. Overall, 45% of the respondents reported ever-used of illicit drugs. The four most commonly used drugs among staff were cannabis, cocaine, ecstasy/MDMA, and amphetamine. The majority of respondents supported Norway's strict drug laws, and 63% reported observing drug-intoxicated patrons at licensed premises during the past six months.
The proportion of frequent drinkers and heavy episodic drinking among staff at licensed premises was high, and the prevalence of illicit drug use was much higher compared with the general population. Thus, staff at licensed premises can be considered a risk-group for alcohol and illicit drug use and therefore represent an important target population in club drug-prevention programmes.
PubMed ID
29516786 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol outlet densities and alcohol price: the British Columbia experiment in the partial privatization of alcohol sales off-premise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117275
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2013 May;37(5):854-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Andrew J Treno
William R Ponicki
Tim Stockwell
Scott Macdonald
Paul J Gruenewald
Jinhui Zhao
Gina Martin
Alissa Greer
Author Affiliation
Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation, Berkeley, CA 94704, USA. andrew@prev.org
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2013 May;37(5):854-9
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcohol-Related Disorders
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - supply & distribution
British Columbia
Commerce - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Marketing
Multilevel Analysis
Privatization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Public Policy - economics
Restaurants - economics - statistics & numerical data
Taxes - economics
Abstract
Alcohol beverage prices or taxes have been shown to be related to alcohol sales and use and related problems. What is not clear are the mechanisms underlying these relationships.
This study examines the relationship between alcohol outlet density under conditions of the partial privatization of off-premise consumption in British Columbia (BC) occurring over the past decade. Two hypotheses are tested. First, reflecting basic supply-demand principles, greater geographic densities of alcohol outlets will be directly related to reductions in beverage prices in response to greater competition. Second, reflecting the effects of niche marketing and resulting market stratification, increased densities of private liquor stores will be especially related to reductions in beverage prices within this outlet category. Data were collected from: (i) a survey of BC private store prices and practices, (ii) alcohol outlet location information, and (iii) data on demographic characteristics. Multilevel models examine the relationships between prices at individual private liquor stores and the densities of government liquor stores, private liquor stores, bars, and restaurants, controlling for background demographics and geographic unit level effects. Spatial dependencies were also examined.
Increased densities of private liquor stores were associated with lower mean prices of beer and all alcohol aggregated across brands at the store level. There appeared to be no outlet level effect on discounting patterns, however, with the mean price differences apparently reflecting differences in the quality of brands carried rather than unequal prices for any given brand.
Increased densities of private off-sale alcohol outlets appear to result in lower prices charged at said establishments independently of other types of alcohol outlets suggesting that they represent an emerging marketing niche in the context of off-sale outlet privatization.
PubMed ID
23316802 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol prevention targeting licensed premises: a study of effects on violence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9739
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Mar;64(2):270-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Eva Wallin
Thor Norström
Sven Andréasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. eva.wallin@stad.org
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 2003 Mar;64(2):270-7
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - epidemiology - prevention & control
Community Mental Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration
Crime - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Law Enforcement
Licensure - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Restaurants - legislation & jurisprudence
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Violence - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: This research studied the effects of a community alcohol prevention program on violent crimes. Starting in 1996, a 10-year multicomponent program based on community mobilization, training in responsible beverage service for servers and stricter enforcement of existing alcohol laws has been conducted in Stockholm, Sweden. The project has been led by an action group consisting of members from the hospitality industry and the authorities. METHOD: We used a time-series quasi-experimental design that included a control area. Data on police-reported violence during the period of January 1994 to September 2000 were analyzed through ARIMA modeling. RESULTS: During the intervention period, violent crimes decreased significantly by 29% in the intervention area, controlled for the development in the control area. CONCLUSIONS: The intervention seems to have been successful in reducing violent crimes. This effect is most likely due to a combination of various policy changes initiated by the project. The findings support the notion that community action projects working on a local basis can be effective in decreasing alcohol-related problems at licensed premises.
PubMed ID
12713202 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Addiction. 1994 Jun;89(6):733-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1994
Author
S. Larsen
Author Affiliation
Finnmark College, Department of Tourism, Alta, Norway.
Source
Addiction. 1994 Jun;89(6):733-41
Date
Jun-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Restaurants
Students - psychology
Abstract
It is frequently alleged that hotel and restaurant personnel drink more than other groups in the service industry, although only indirect evidence has been presented to substantiate this allegation. This paper reports data from two surveys concerning alcohol use in different segments of the service industry. In the first study 84 students at three different colleges in the Stavanger region were interviewed concerning their alcohol habits using the screening instrument AUDIT (Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test). The second survey concentrated on service employees in the Rogaland area. One hundred and five respondents answered the AUDIT questionnaire in this study. The results showed that hotel and restaurant affiliated individuals scored significantly higher on the AUDIT than the other respondents. The first survey indicated that students at the Norwegian College of Hotel Management obtained significantly higher AUDIT scores than other groups of students, whereas the second survey indicated that restaurant workers scored significantly higher than employees in other branches of the service industry. Implications of these results, as well as future research demands were indicated.
PubMed ID
8069174 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analysis of non-compliance with smoke-free legislation in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300287
Source
Int J Public Health. 2019 Apr; 64(3):413-422
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Liudmila Zasimova
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Economics, Faculty of Economic Sciences, National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE), 28/2, Room 2214 Shabolovka Str., Moscow, Russian Federation, 119049. Lzasimova@hse.ru.
Source
Int J Public Health. 2019 Apr; 64(3):413-422
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Guideline Adherence - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Restaurants - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Smoke-Free Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Socioeconomic Factors
Universities - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The study examined the smokers' non-compliance rates in indoor public places in Russia and the sociodemographic factors associated with non-compliance.
Univariate analysis and logistic regression models were performed using cross-sectional data from a representative sample of Russian adults (N?=?4006).
27.2% of Russian smokers did not comply with smoke-free bans. Non-compliance was attributed to sociodemographic characteristics of smokers, mainly to the number of cigarettes smoked per day, regular alcohol consumption, being aged between 15 and 34 years, being in the highest income group and living in an urban area. Neither the sex, nor the family status of smokers exerted a statistically significant affiliation with non-compliance. Higher rates of non-compliance were observed in restaurants, cafes, bars and nightclubs, common domestic premises of apartment buildings and indoor workplaces. Violations on public transport, in governmental buildings, health and sport facilities, colleges and universities were less common.
There is a need to revise the methods of enforcement with respect to sociodemographic characteristics of smokers associated with non-compliance in public places where violations are widespread.
PubMed ID
30734060 View in PubMed
Less detail

An outbreak of Bacillus cereus implicating a part-time banquet caterer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188374
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Sep-Oct;93(5):353-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Colette Gaulin
Yv Bonnier Viger
Lise Fillion
Author Affiliation
Centre de santé publique de Québec, 2400 rue d'Estimauville, Beauport, Québec, G1E 7G9. colette.gaulin@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Sep-Oct;93(5):353-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacillus cereus - isolation & purification
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Cohort Studies
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Food Contamination
Food Services - standards
Foodborne Diseases - microbiology
Humans
Quebec - epidemiology
Restaurants - standards
Sanitation
Abstract
In the aftermath of a party, 70% (25 of 36) of attendees had gastroenteritis. The objectives of this study were to identify a risk factor associated with the food during the banquet and to identify measures of control for avoiding this kind of outbreak in the future.
A retrospective cohort study was used. We tried to reach by telephone all guests who had attended this banquet. A standardized questionnaire was used to provide information about identification of a risk factor, especially in relation to food.
The cohort study has shown that potato salad served at the party was significantly associated with the disease. The mayonnaise used to prepare the salad was analyzed and Bacillus cereus was isolated (10(3) bacteria per gram).
Bacillus microorganisms are usually found in decaying organic matter, dust, soil, vegetables and water. The bacteria has a remarkable ability to survive strong environmental stresses. There are strains of B. cereus that can cause food poisoning episodes with infective doses as low as 10(3) to 10(4) bacteria per gram. B. cereus is an infrequently reported cause of foodborne illnesses in Quebec and in North America but this may be due to underreporting of episodes. In this outbreak, bacterial multiplication was facilitated at several points in the interval between the preparation of the meal and the consumption of the banquet by the guests. Because the spores are ubiquitous and resistant to inactivation with most food grade disinfectants, temperature control should be the main focus of B. cereus outbreak prevention.
The meal was prepared by a restaurateur who was inexperienced in catering services and temperature control in particular when food is served outside the restaurant. This outbreak underscores the importance of maintaining meticulous hygienic procedures in food processing. Restaurateurs who offer catering services should be familiar with the constraints that are specific to this sector of the food industry.
PubMed ID
12353456 View in PubMed
Less detail

177 records – page 1 of 18.