Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

The causes of hospital-treated acute lower respiratory tract infection in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226291
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1991 Jun;145(6):618-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1991
Author
H. Nohynek
J. Eskola
E. Laine
P. Halonen
P. Ruutu
P. Saikku
M. Kleemola
M. Leinonen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1991 Jun;145(6):618-22
Date
Jun-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adenoviridae Infections - microbiology
Adolescent
Bacterial Infections - microbiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Haemophilus Infections - microbiology
Haemophilus influenzae - isolation & purification
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Influenza, Human - microbiology
Male
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis - isolation & purification
Pneumococcal Infections - microbiology
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses - isolation & purification
Respiratory Tract Infections - microbiology
Respirovirus Infections - microbiology
Urban Population
Virus Diseases - microbiology
Abstract
To determine the etiologic agents in children with acute lower respiratory infection.
A survey of a series of patients.
General pediatric hospital serving an urban population with and without referrals in Helsinki, Finland.
135 Finnish children aged 2 months to 15 years (mean, 1.75 years), with clinically defined acute lower respiratory infection (with difficulty of breathing), or found to have fever and a pneumonic infiltrate on chest roentgenogram.
Consecutive sample on voluntary basis.
None.
Of 121 children with adequate samples, an etiologic diagnosis could be established in 84 (70%): 30 (25%) had bacterial, 30 (25%) viral, and 24 (20%) mixed infections. Antibody assays alone identified the agent in 91% of positive cases.
Bacterial infections are common but generally underestimated in acute lower respiratory infection; serologic methods add significantly to their detection.
PubMed ID
1852095 View in PubMed
Less detail

Multicenter study of strains of respiratory syncytial virus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226594
Source
J Infect Dis. 1991 Apr;163(4):687-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
L J Anderson
R M Hendry
L T Pierik
C. Tsou
K. McIntosh
Author Affiliation
Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, Georgia.
Source
J Infect Dis. 1991 Apr;163(4):687-92
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antigens, Viral - analysis
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Fluorescent Antibody Technique
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Infant
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses - classification - immunology - isolation & purification
Respirovirus Infections - microbiology
United States
Abstract
Two major groups of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) strains, A and B, have been identified and their patterns of isolation determined in different communities but not simultaneously in multiple communities. In this study, we tested 483 RSV isolates from 14 university laboratories in the United States and Canada for the 1984/1985 and 1985/1986 RSV seasons; 303 (63%) isolates were group A, 114 (24%) were group B, and 66 (14%) could not be grouped. Isolates were subdivided into six subgroups within group A and three within group B; up to six and often four or more different subgroups were isolated in the same laboratory during the same RSV season. The pattern of group and subgroup isolations varied among laboratories during the same year and between years for the same laboratory. These differences suggest that RSV outbreaks are community, possibly regional, but not national phenomena. The ability to identify group and subgroup differences in isolates is a powerful tool for epidemiologic studies of RSV.
PubMed ID
2010623 View in PubMed
Less detail