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Cancer among the foreign-born in New York State.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244018
Source
Cancer. 1981 Nov 15;48(10):2323-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1981
Author
P C Nasca
P. Greenwald
W S Burnett
S. Chorost
W. Schmidt
Source
Cancer. 1981 Nov 15;48(10):2323-8
Date
Nov-15-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - ethnology
Digestive System Neoplasms - mortality
Europe - ethnology
Europe, Eastern - ethnology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Head and Neck Neoplasms - mortality
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
New York
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - mortality
Risk
Transients and Migrants
Urogenital Neoplasms - mortality
Abstract
Cancer deaths among white, foreign-born residents of New York State (exclusive of New York City) during the years 1969 through 1971 were analyzed according to country of birth. The largest numbers of immigrants came from Great Britain, Ireland, Germany, Austria, Poland, Italy, USSR, and Canada. Several distinctive features emerged from these data: Irish immigrants have an increased risk of dying from oropharyngeal, gastrointestinal, lung, and prostate cancers. Among all migrant groups studied, contrasting mortality patterns observed for carcinomas of the stomach, colon, and rectum provide further support for the concept that these neoplasms result from different etiologic processes. For the leukemias, lymphomas, and carcinomas of the breast and colon, each of the migrant groups acquired the higher risk common to others in the host country. This rise in risk suggests a major environmental component for cancers of these sites.
PubMed ID
7296482 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality among Alaskan Natives, 1960-69.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4285
Source
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 1975 Sep;55(3):547-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1975
Author
W J Blot
A Lanier
J F Fraumeni
T R Bender
Source
Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 1975 Sep;55(3):547-54
Date
Sep-1975
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alaska
Cancer registry
Cervical Neoplasms - mortality
Continental Population Groups
Esophageal Neoplasms - mortality
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Kidney Neoplasms - mortality
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Male
Middle Aged
Nasopharyngeal Neoplasms - mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
NPC
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - mortality
Salivary Gland Neoplasms - mortality
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - mortality
Abstract
During 1960-69, 321 reported deaths among Alaskan natives (Eskimos, Indians, and Aleuts) were attributed to cancer. This number is not significantly different from the cancer mortality of U.S. Caucasians during this period, but is significantly higher than that of U.S. Indians. The mortality of Alaskan natives from cancers of the nasopharynx, esophagus, kidneys, and salivary glands was significantly increased. Among Alaskan Caucasians, only nasopharyngeal cancer was in excess in both sexes. Deficits in mortality among Alaskan Caucasians for cancers of other sites may be attributable, at least in part, to selection factors associated with the migration of healthy workers into the State.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 2148.
PubMed ID
1159833 View in PubMed
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Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1995 Oct;4(5):389-417
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
F. Levi
C. La Vecchia
F. Lucchini
E. Negri
Author Affiliation
Institut Universitaire de Médecine Sociale et Préventive, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland.
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 1995 Oct;4(5):389-417
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - mortality
Death Certificates
Digestive System Neoplasms - mortality
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - mortality
Humans
Information Systems
Leukemia - mortality
Lung Neoplasms - mortality
Lymphoma - mortality
Male
Neoplasms - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - mortality
Sex Factors
Smoking - prevention & control
Stomach Neoplasms - mortality
Urogenital Neoplasms - mortality
World Health Organization
Abstract
Histograms of all age-standardized (world population) death certification rates for 23 cancers or groups of cancers for the period 1990-92 were produced for 35 countries of the European region (including a dozen new national entities) providing data to the World ealth Organization database. Substantial variations were observed in mortality from most common sites. For lung cancer the rate in males was 81/100,000 in Hungary, followed by Belgium, the Czech Republic, the Russian Federation and Poland, while in Sweden, Iceland and Norway, where comprehensive antismoking campaigns have been adopted over the last two decades, the rates were between 24 and 30 per 100,000 males. The lung cancer epidemic in European females is still in its early phases in most countries, with the sole exception of Scotland (29/100,000, ie the highest rates in the world), the rest of the UK, Denmark, Iceland, Ireland and Hungary. With reference to colorectal cancer, the highest rates were in the Czech Republic (38/100,000 males, 21/100,000 females) and other central European countries, and the lowest in Greece, Romania and a few Republics of the former Soviet Union, as well as Finland and Sweden. The highest gastric cancer mortality rates were in the Russian Federation (41/100,000 males, 18/100,000 females), followed by a few Republics of the former Soviet Union and Portugal in Western Europe. The highest breast cancer rates (25-29 per 100,000 females) were in the UK, Belgium, Ireland, The Netherlands, Denmark and other Scandinavian countries. For overall cancer mortality, the range of variation was between 260/100,000 in Hungary and 132/100,000 in Sweden for males, and between 142/100,000 in Denmark and 76/100,000 in Kyrgizstan for females, ie approximately a twofold variation in both sexes.
PubMed ID
7496328 View in PubMed
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Cancer survival in Sweden 1960-1998--developments across four decades.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18011
Source
Acta Oncol. 2003;42(7):637-59
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Mats Talbäck
Magnus Stenbeck
Måns Rosén
Lotti Barlow
Bengt Glimelius
Author Affiliation
Centre for Epidemiology, The National Board of Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden. mats.talback@sos.se
Source
Acta Oncol. 2003;42(7):637-59
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Breast Neoplasms - mortality
Digestive System Neoplasms - mortality
Endocrine System
Female
Hematologic Neoplasms - mortality
Humans
Lymphoma - mortality
Male
Neoplasms - mortality
Nervous System Neoplasms - mortality
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - mortality
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - mortality
Survival Analysis
Survival Rate
Sweden
Time Factors
Urogenital Neoplasms - mortality
Abstract
This paper summarizes a comprehensive study of cancer survival in Sweden from 1960 to 1998. A total of 1021421 persons and 40 different cancer sites were included in the analyses. The main outcome measure is the relative survival rate (RSR) for different sites and follow-up times after diagnosis. The 10-year RSR for all sites combined has increased steadily-from 26.6% among men and 41.8% among women in the 1960s, to 44.6% (men) and 57.6% (women) in the 1990s. The expectation of life for a person diagnosed with cancer today is about 7 years longer than that of one diagnosed during the mid-1960s. About 3 years are gained due to changes in the relative distribution of various cancer types and about 4 years due to improved relative survival. During the 1990s substantial survival improvements were observed not only for uncommon types, such as testicular cancer, Hodgkin's lymphoma and some other haematologic malignancies, but also for cancer of the rectum, kidney and malignant melanoma. Survival for breast and cervical cancer also improved during the 1990s, but not that for pancreatic, liver or lung cancer.
PubMed ID
14690151 View in PubMed
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Comment on McDonald et al's study on mortality in asbestos industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature255574
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1972 Apr;24(4):294-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1972

Deaths and tumours among rotogravure printers exposed to toluene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25187
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1990 Jun;47(6):372-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
B G Svensson
G. Nise
V. Englander
R. Attewell
S. Skerfving
T. Möller
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1990 Jun;47(6):372-9
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Benzene - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Coloring Agents - adverse effects
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Printing
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - mortality
Solvents - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Toluene - adverse effects
Abstract
A cohort of 1020 rotogravure printers exposed to toluene and employed for a minimum period of three months in eight plants during 1925-85 was studied. Air levels of toluene were available since 1943 in one plant and since 1969 in most. Based on these measurements and on present concentrations of toluene in blood and subcutaneous fat, the yearly average air levels in each plant were estimated. They reached a maximum of about 450 ppm in the 1940s and 1950s but were only about 30 ppm by the mid-1980s. Exposure to benzene had occurred up to the beginning of the 1960s. Compared with regional rates, total mortality did not increase during the observation period 1952-86 (129 observed deaths v 125 expected; SMR = 1.03). There was no increase in mortality from non-malignant diseases of the lungs, nervous system, or gastrointestinal and urinary tracts. There was no overall excess of tumours 1958-85 (68 v 54, SMR = 1.26; 95% confidence interval, CI = 0.95-1.7). Among the specific cancers, only those of the respiratory tract were significantly increased (16 v 9; SMR = 1.76, CI = 1.03-2.9). Statistical significance was not attained, however, when only subjects with an exposure period of at least five years and a latency period of at least 10 years were considered. Further, there were no dose response relations with cumulated toluene dose (ppm years). There were no significant increases of tumours at other sites, including leukaemias/lymphomas/myelomas.
PubMed ID
2378814 View in PubMed
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[Geographic relations between death caused by cancer of the respiratory system and industrial employment data].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241595
Source
Union Med Can. 1983 Sep;112(9):777-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1983

Increased Cancer Incidence in the Local Population Around Metal-Contaminated Glassworks Sites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290247
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2017 May; 59(5):e84-e90
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Fredrik Nyqvist
Ingela Helmfrid
Anna Augustsson
Gun Wingren
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden (Nyqvist, Helmfrid, Dr Wingren); and Department of Biology and Environmental Science, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Linneaus University, Kalmar, Sweden (Dr Augustsson).
Source
J Occup Environ Med. 2017 May; 59(5):e84-e90
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Digestive System Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortality
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Glass
Humans
Incidence
Male
Manufacturing and Industrial Facilities
Metals, Heavy - toxicity
Prostatic Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Registries
Respiratory Tract Diseases - mortality
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - mortality
Sex Factors
Soil - chemistry
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine mortality causes and cancer incidence in a population cohort that have resided in close proximity to highly metal-contaminated sources, characterized by contamination of, in particular, arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), and lead (Pb).
Data from Swedish registers were used to calculate standardized mortality and cancer incidence ratios. An attempt to relate cancer incidence to metal contamination levels was made.
Significantly elevated cancer incidences were observed for overall malignant cancers in both genders, cancer in the digestive system, including colon, rectum, and pancreas, and cancers in prostate among men. Dose-response relationships between Cd and Pb levels in soil and cancer risks were found.
Cancer observations made, together with previous studies of metal uptake in local vegetables, may imply that exposure to local residents have occurred primarily via oral intake of locally produced foodstuffs.
PubMed ID
28437293 View in PubMed
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Mortality among Finnish doctors, 1953-1972.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature247693
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1979;7(2):55-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
S. Asp
S. Hernberg
Y. Collan
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1979;7(2):55-62
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Coronary Disease - mortality
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Physicians
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - mortality
Sex Factors
Smoking
Abstract
The mortality with respect to the total population of Finnish physicians during the period 1953 to 1972 has been analysed and compared with the corresponding statistics for the general Finnish population, for Finnish foundry workers, and for American physicians. It was found that the overall mortality was lower for male physicians than that for the general population or for foundry workers, but was clearly higher than that for American physicians. Male physicians did not exhibit any major differences from the general population with regard to cardiovascular diseases and suicide, but had a lower mortality from malignant neoplasms, accidents and "other diseases" (including infectious diseases). The explanation of cancer mortality being lower than expected among male physicians was mainly to be found in a deficit in lung cancer. Although female physicians had higher life expectancy than male physicians and the female general Finnish population, they did not show any clear deficit for cancer. In respect of all specialists, surgical specialists had the lowest mortality; general practitioners had the highest mortality. Most of these variations were attributable to differences in coronary mortality, but mortality from lung cancer was also remarkably low among surgeons. Differences of a similar type were also found between occupational sub-categories; private practitioners had the highest, and research workers and central hospital physicians the lowest mortality figures. The lower cancer mortality among male physicians, as contrasted with the general population, is probably attributable to differences in smoking habits; about 22% of male physicians smoked in 1973, whereas earlier studies by others have indicated that the corresponding proportion was about 50% in the general population. In contrast, the differences in mortality between different specialist categories probably arises from other factors, since Finnish physicians reportedly display a relatively homogeneous smoking pattern.
PubMed ID
482898 View in PubMed
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Mortality among male and female smokers in Sweden: a 33 year follow up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19510
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2001 Nov;55(11):825-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2001
Author
S. Nilsson
J M Carstensen
G. Pershagen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Society, Tema Institute, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. stani@tema.liu.se
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2001 Nov;55(11):825-30
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aortic Aneurysm - mortality
Cause of Death
Confidence Intervals
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - mortality
Peptic Ulcer - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Pulmonary Emphysema - mortality
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - mortality
Sex Factors
Smoking - mortality
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: It is still unclear if men and women are equally susceptible to the hazards of tobacco smoking. The objective of this study was to examine smoking related mortality among men and women. DESIGN: In 1963 a questionnaire concerning tobacco smoking habits was sent out to a random sample from the 1960 Swedish census population. Date and cause of death have been collected for the deceased in the cohort through 1996. SETTING: Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: The survey included a total of 27 841 men and 28 089 women, aged 18-69 years. The response rate was 93.1% among the men and 95.4% among the women. MAIN RESULTS: After adjustment for age and place of residence positive associations were found between cigarette smoking and mortality from ischaemic heart disease, aortic aneurysm, bronchitis and emphysema, cancer of the lung, upper aerodigestive sites, bladder, pancreas in both men and women, but not from cerebrovascular disease. When the effect of amount of the cigarette consumption was considered, female smokers displayed, for example, slightly higher relative death rates from ischaemic heart disease. However, no statistically significant gender differential in relative mortality rates was observed for any of the studied diseases. CONCLUSIONS: Women and men in this Swedish cohort seem equally susceptible to the hazards of smoking, when the gender differential in smoking characteristics is accounted for. Although the cohort under study is large, there were few female smokers in the high consuming categories and the relative risk estimates are therefore accompanied by wide confidence intervals in these categories.
PubMed ID
11604439 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.