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19 records – page 1 of 2.

Cancer mortality (1965-77) in relation to diesel fume and coal exposure in a cohort of retired railway workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241865
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1983 Jun;70(6):1015-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1983
Author
G R Howe
D. Fraser
J. Lindsay
B. Presnal
S Z Yu
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1983 Jun;70(6):1015-9
Date
Jun-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asbestos
Canada
Coal
Computers
Fuel Oils
Humans
Male
Methods
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Probability
Railroads
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Retirement
Abstract
A cohort study of 43,826 male pensioners of the Canadian National Railway Company was conducted. The cause of death of 17,838 pensioners who died between 1965 and 1977 was ascertained by computerized record linkage to the Canadian national mortality data base. The main finding was an elevated risk of lung cancer for those employed in occupations involving exposure to diesel fumes and coal dust, with highly significant dose-response relationships observed. That such association may be due in part to smoking cannot be excluded; but in view of the widespread exposure to diesel fumes, the finding warrants further investigation. The present study also demonstrated the utility and feasibility of large-scale occupational cohort studies conducted with the use of computerized record linkage to national mortality records.
PubMed ID
6574269 View in PubMed
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Cancer mortality associated with the high-temperature oxidation of nickel subsulfide.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241118
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1984;(53):23-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
R S Roberts
J A Julian
D C Muir
H S Shannon
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 1984;(53):23-35
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Carcinogens, Environmental
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Male
Metallurgy
Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Nickel - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - mortality
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - chemically induced - mortality
Abstract
An historical prospective mortality study of INCO's Ontario work-force has been conducted. A cohort of approximately 54 000 men, employed in all aspects of the extraction and refining of copper and nickel from the Sudbury ore deposit, have been followed for mortality between 1950 and 1976. A total of 5 283 deaths were identified by computerized record-linkage to the Canadian Mortality Data Base of death certificates. The analysis focuses on mortality from cancer of the nasal sinuses, larynx, lung, and kidney. Little evidence was found for increased mortality from laryngeal or kidney cancer, but lung and nasal cancer deaths were clearly elevated in men exposed to the two Sudbury area sinter plants and at Port Colborne in the leaching, calcining, and sintering department. The standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for lung cancer increases linearly with increasing duration of exposure and there is no evidence of a threshold. The nasal cancer mortality rate also rises linearly with duration of exposure. While lung cancer has a greater excess in the Sudbury sinter plant than at Port Colborne, the reverse is true for mortality from nasal cancer, which is ten times more frequent at Port Colborne than at Sudbury.
PubMed ID
6532983 View in PubMed
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Cancer risk among oil refinery workers. A review of epidemiologic studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240191
Source
J Occup Med. 1984 Sep;26(9):662-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1984
Author
D A Savitz
R. Moure
Source
J Occup Med. 1984 Sep;26(9):662-70
Date
Sep-1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain Neoplasms - chemically induced
Canada
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Gastrointestinal Neoplasms - chemically induced
Great Britain
Humans
Leukemia - chemically induced
Lymphoma - chemically induced
Male
Melanoma - chemically induced
Neoplasms - chemically induced
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Petroleum - adverse effects
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - chemically induced
Risk
United States
Urogenital Neoplasms - chemically induced
Abstract
The possibility that excess cancers result from occupational exposures in oil refineries has generated a great deal of interest. Ecological studies and case-control studies in the general population have suggested a positive association between oil industry activity and cancer rates, with more direct evidence provided by studies of refinery employees. The eight investigations of cancer risks among refinery employees are critically reviewed. The methodological strengths and weaknesses of these studies are evaluated with an emphasis on the likely impact on the results. While the results are markedly inconsistent across studies, there is some suggestion of excess risks for melanoma and for brain, stomach, kidney, and pancreatic cancers. Problems with exposure characterization, latency, and potential confounding factors limit all of the studies that were reviewed.
PubMed ID
6384444 View in PubMed
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Collagen matrix in development and progression of experimentally induced respiratory neoplasms in the hamster.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19468
Source
Toxicol Pathol. 2001 Sep-Oct;29(5):514-27
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Laitakari
F. Stenbäck
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Toxicol Pathol. 2001 Sep-Oct;29(5):514-27
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Carbazoles - administration & dosage - toxicity
Carcinogenicity Tests
Carcinogens - toxicity
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - chemically induced - pathology
Collagen - biosynthesis - genetics - ultrastructure
Cricetinae
Extracellular Matrix - drug effects - metabolism - pathology
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Immunohistochemistry
In Situ Hybridization
Intubation, Intratracheal
Mesocricetus
Papilloma - chemically induced - pathology
RNA, Messenger - analysis - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - chemically induced - pathology
Transforming Growth Factor beta - analysis - metabolism
Tumor Markers, Biological - metabolism
Abstract
Intratracheal instillations of 7H-dibenzo(c, g)carbazole (DBC), a tobacco smoke component, into Syrian golden hamsters, resulted in preneoplastic lesions and benign and malignant respiratory neoplasms. Neoplastic progression was associated with specific changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM), dependent on the stage of tumor development. DBC-induced tracheobronchial squamous metaplasia was associated with an increase in collagen type I and type III deposition in the subepithelial ECM, as observed by computer-assisted image analysis of immunohistochemical staining for the aminoterminal propeptides of collagen type I (PINP) and collagen type III (PIIINP). Increased collagen matrix synthesis was detected in dysplasia by in situ hybridization of alpha1(I) mRNA for collagen I and alpha1(III) mRNA for collagen type III after continued exposure to DBC. In well-differentiated squamous cell carcinomas with an expansive growth pattern, collagen deposition increased, as did fiber size. In moderately differentiated neoplasms, basement membrane (BM) destruction and invasion was associated with a destructive growth pattern and decreases in collagen synthesis and the deposition of new collagen. Preserved deposition of mature collagen was detected by staining for the telopeptide of collagen type I propeptide. In less differentiated tumors, ECM development was minimal, with few and small fibers, possibly explaining the rapid development of these neoplasms. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta1) immunoreactivity was increased in hyperplastic epithelium and well differentiated neoplasms and decreased in dysplasia and less differentiated squamous cell carcinomas, while TGFbeta2 and TGFbeta3 expression was also distinct in neoplastic cells. Collagen synthesis and epithelial differentiation were associated with an increased number of myofibroblasts in the ECM and with increased TGFbeta3 immunoreactivity in differentiated cells and in the matrix. The nature of the composition of the ECM was related to neoplastic growth and progression when analyzed by computer-associated image analysis, revealing alterations in collagen structure, size, and shape.
PubMed ID
11695568 View in PubMed
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Empirical assessment of the effect of different summary worklife exposure measures on the estimation of risk in case-referent studies of occupational cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223377
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1992 Aug;18(4):233-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1992
Author
M E Suarez-Almazor
C L Soskolne
K. Fung
G S Jhangri
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Services Administration and Community Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 1992 Aug;18(4):233-41
Date
Aug-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Humans
Laryngeal Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Louisiana - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sulfuric Acids - adverse effects
Abstract
The effect of different summary measures of worklife exposure on the estimation of risk is reported. Two matched case-referent studies associating sulfuric acid exposure and cancer from Baton Rouge and southern Ontario were used. Five summary exposure measures were converted to discrete levels of exposure through the selection of equivalent percentile points on each measure's respective percentage frequency distribution for logistic regression modeling purposes. The southern Ontario data set exhibited only minor differences across all five exposure measures. The Baton Rouge data set, however, produced different results, and the time-dependent measures appeared to underestimate risk. It is possible, therefore, to obtain different estimates of risk depending on the exposure measure selected. It is recommended that, in the absence of proved models for assessing exposure, a variety of summary measures be used to estimate risk. This approach would facilitate the comparison of findings across studies.
PubMed ID
1411365 View in PubMed
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[Industrial aerosols and the prevention of oncologic diseases in the foundries of nickel-processing plants].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228664
Source
Gig Sanit. 1990 Aug;(8):40-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1990
Author
G Ia Lipatov
S G Domnin
A A Kiseleva
N P Sharipova
L N Pylev
Source
Gig Sanit. 1990 Aug;(8):40-1
Date
Aug-1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Dust - adverse effects - prevention & control
Filtration - instrumentation
Humans
Male
Metallurgy - instrumentation - standards
Middle Aged
Nickel - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - prevention & control
Occupational Medicine - instrumentation - standards
Respiratory Tract Neoplasms - chemically induced - prevention & control
Russia
Abstract
On the basis of hygienic studies in foundries of nickel plants conditions for and character of the formation of industrial aerosols, their physico-chemical properties are studied. The data obtained indicate significant pollution in the occupational areas with ++nickel-containing aerosols. High carcinogenic risk has been shown to characterize the foundries. A dependence of workers' mortality due to malignant tumours on nickel and its compounds content in the air of occupational area has been shown. A complex of health-improving measures aimed at reducing oncological morbidity of workers in foundries of nickel plants is presented. A priority significance is attributed to application of new technological processes in production.
PubMed ID
2149348 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.