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Acute infections and environmental exposure to organochlorines in Inuit infants from Nunavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4455
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):1359-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Frédéric Dallaire
Eric Dewailly
Gina Muckle
Carole Vézina
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Pierre Ayotte
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, and Public Health Research Unit, CHUQ-Laval University Medical Center, 945 Wolfe Street, Sainte-Foy, Québec G1V 5B3, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):1359-65
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - analysis - poisoning
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - poisoning
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Insecticides - analysis - poisoning
Inuits
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - poisoning
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The Inuit population of Nunavik (Canada) is exposed to immunotoxic organochlorines (OCs) mainly through the consumption of fish and marine mammal fat. We investigated the effect of perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) on the incidence of acute infections in Inuit infants. We reviewed the medical charts of a cohort of 199 Inuit infants during the first 12 months of life and evaluated the incidence rates of upper and lower respiratory tract infections (URTI and LRTIs, respectively), otitis media, and gastrointestinal (GI) infections. Maternal plasma during delivery and infant plasma at 7 months of age were sampled and assayed for PCBs and DDE. Compared to rates for infants in the first quartile of exposure to PCBs (least exposed), adjusted rate ratios for infants in higher quartiles ranged between 1.09 and 1.32 for URTIs, 0.99 and 1.39 for otitis, 1.52 and 1.89 for GI infections, and 1.16 and 1.68 for LRTIs during the first 6 months of follow-up. For all infections combined, the rate ratios ranged from 1.17 to 1.27. The effect size was similar for DDE exposure but was lower for the full 12-month follow-up. Globally, most rate ratios were > 1.0, but few were statistically significant (p
PubMed ID
15471725 View in PubMed
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Bathing fever epidemic of unknown aetiology in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245487
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1980 Sep;9(3):215-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1980
Author
S. Aro
A. Muittari
P. Virtanen
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1980 Sep;9(3):215-8
Date
Sep-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Bacterial Infections
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Syndrome
Water Microbiology
Water supply
Abstract
Since August, 1978, an epidemic characterised by respiratory symptoms and fever spread rapidly in a restricted area near Tampere, Finland. Four months later over half of the adult population reported intermittent or constant symptoms. The most frequent symptoms were cough, dyspnoea, chills, fever, headaches, muscle pain and aching of joints. The symptoms appeared to be associated with exposure to water vapour derived from tap water. Consequently this disease, which resembled extrinsic allergic alveolitis, was given the name 'bathing fever' for lack of any prevailing diagnosis. In clinical provocation tests lung diffusion capacity usually decreased, the leucocyte count increased, and a slight rise in body temperature was observed. Despite many efforts the specific causative agent in the tap water has not been identified. Neither massive chlorination of the water nor changing the sand filter of the water-works had any significant effect on the quality of the water. Therefore the source of water supply was changed in April, 1979. The symptoms have subsequently disappeared. Present knowledge about bathing fever suggests that, though rare, it may be typical of the Scandinavian type of climate.
PubMed ID
7440043 View in PubMed
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Breastfeeding, maternal smoking and lower respiratory tract infections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34548
Source
Eur Respir J. 1996 Dec;9(12):2623-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
P. Nafstad
J J Jaakkola
J A Hagen
G. Botten
J. Kongerud
Author Affiliation
Dept of Population Health Sciences, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1996 Dec;9(12):2623-9
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Feeding
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Logistic Models
Male
Maternal Behavior
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
The objective of the study was to assess the relationship between breastfeeding and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) during the first year of life, with special reference to maternal smoking. A cohort of 3,754 children born in 1992-1993 in the City of Oslo, Norway was recruited and data were collected at birth, 6 and 12 months of age. Complete information was obtained from 3,238 children (follow-up rate 86%). The main outcome was an episode of a LRTI, such as pneumonia, bronchitis or bronchiolitis, based on a self-administered questionnaire addressed to parents when the child was 6 and 12 months old. The outcome was specified as physician-diagnosed. In logistic regression analysis adjusting for confounding, maternal smoking increased the risk of LRTIs in children breastfed for 0-6 months (odds ratio (AOR) 1.7; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.2-2.4), but not essentially when the child was breastfed for more than 6 months (AOR 1.1; 95% CI 0.7-1.6). Short-term breastfeeding (0-6 months) and no maternal smoking was related to an adjusted AOR of LRTIs of 1.3 (95% CI 1.0-1.7), and short-term breastfeeding combined with maternal smoking was related to an adjusted AOR of 2.2 (95% CI 1.6-3.1), as compared with long-term breastfeeding and no maternal smoking. The present study indicates a protective effect of long-term breastfeeding on the risk of lower respiratory tract infection during the first year of life. The results suggest that the protective effect is strongest in children exposed to environmental tobacco smoke.
PubMed ID
8980979 View in PubMed
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A closer look at travellers' infections abroad: Finnish nationwide data with incidences, 2010 to 2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282463
Source
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2017 Jan - Feb;15:29-36
Publication Type
Article
Author
Heli Siikamäki
Pia Kivelä
Mikael Fotopoulos
Anu Kantele
Source
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2017 Jan - Feb;15:29-36
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa
Asia
Communicable disease control
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology
Diarrhea - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Europe
Female
Fever - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Finland - epidemiology
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Incidence
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Information Storage and Retrieval
Male
Morbidity
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Travel
Vaccines
Abstract
Although infections represent the most common health problem of travellers abroad, data on morbidity and incidences of various infections are scarce.
Data on infections of Finnish travellers during 2010-2012 were retrieved from the database of SOS International, an assistance organization covering 95% of Finns requiring aid abroad. The study included 30,086 cases. For incidence calculation, the data were linked to the numbers of Finns visiting these regions during the same period as recorded by the Official Statistics of Finland.
The incidence of infections was particularly high in Africa, southern Europe plus the eastern Mediterranean, and Asia plus Oceania. The most frequent diagnoses were acute gastroenteritis (38.0%) and respiratory-tract infections (RTI) (34.5%), followed by infections of the ear (12.6%), skin or subcutaneous tissue (5.1%), urogenital tract (4.2%), eye (3.1%), and systemic febrile infections (2.2%). Vaccine-preventable diseases (VPD) accounted for 0.8% of cases, with varicella as most (49%) and influenza as second-most (27%) common.
Incidence of infections was higher in southern than in eastern and western Europe. Gastroenteritis and RTI proved the most frequent diagnoses, whereas systemic febrile infections were uncommon. Despite pre-travel immunizations, VPDs still occurred; pre-travel consultation should cover both varicella and influenza.
PubMed ID
27773779 View in PubMed
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Current wheeze, asthma, respiratory infections, and rhinitis among adults in relation to inspection data and indoor measurements in single-family houses in Sweden-The BETSI study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291648
Source
Indoor Air. 2017 07; 27(4):725-736
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
07-2017
Author
J Wang
K Engvall
G Smedje
H Nilsson
D Norbäck
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University and University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Indoor Air. 2017 07; 27(4):725-736
Date
07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - epidemiology
Construction Materials - adverse effects
Environmental monitoring
Housing
Humans
Humidity - adverse effects
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Rhinitis - epidemiology
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
In the Swedish Building Energy, Technical Status and Indoor environment study, a total of 1160 adults from 605 single-family houses answered a questionnaire on respiratory health. Building inspectors investigated the homes and measured temperature, air humidity, air exchange rate, and wood moisture content (in attic and crawl space). Moisture load was calculated as the difference between indoor and outdoor absolute humidity. Totally, 7.3% were smokers, 8.7% had doctor' diagnosed asthma, 11.2% current wheeze, and 9.5% current asthma symptoms. Totally, 50.3% had respiratory infections and 26.0% rhinitis. The mean air exchange rate was 0.36/h, and the mean moisture load 1.70 g/m3 . Damp foundation (OR=1.79, 95% CI 1.16-2.78) was positively associated while floor constructions with crawl space (OR=0.49, 95% CI 0.29-0.84) was negatively associated with wheeze. Concrete slabs with overlying insulation (OR=2.21, 95% CI 1.24-3.92) and brick façade (OR=1.71, 95% CI 1.07-2.73) were associated with rhinitis. Moisture load was associated with respiratory infections (OR=1.21 per 1 g/m3 , 95% CI 1.04-1.40) and rhinitis (OR=1.36 per 1 g/m3 , 95% CI 1.02-1.83). Air exchange rate was associated with current asthma symptoms (OR=0.85 per 0.1/h, 95% CI 0.73-0.99). Living in homes with damp foundation, concrete slabs with overlying insulation, brick façade, low ventilation flow, and high moisture load are risk factors for asthma, rhinitis, and respiratory infections.
PubMed ID
28005296 View in PubMed
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[Effect of a complex system of controlling influenza on a citywide scale on the etiological structure of acute respiratory diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242089
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1983 Apr;(4):50-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1983
Author
V M Gagarinova
Iu G Kustikova
E V Oleinikova
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1983 Apr;(4):50-3
Date
Apr-1983
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - epidemiology - prevention & control
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology - immunology
Russia
Urban Population
Abstract
Materials on the etiological structure of acute respiratory diseases (ARD) and the spread of respiratory virus infection among the population of the city under the conditions of mass vaccinal prophylaxis and chemoprophylaxis are presented. These materials indicate that the proportion of influenza A virus in the etiological structure of ARD decreased by half as the result of introducing the complex system of influenza control in the city. The proportion of other causative agents of ARD before and after introducing the complex system of influenza control irregularly varied among different age groups of the population without statistical significance. The indices characterizing the spread of influenza A virus infection among the population of the whole city were found to be significantly decreased during the second period of observation.
PubMed ID
6223474 View in PubMed
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Emergence of enterovirus D68 in Denmark, June 2014 to February 2015.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269394
Source
Euro Surveill. 2015;20(17)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
S E Midgley
C B Christiansen
M W Poulsen
C H Hansen
T K Fischer
Source
Euro Surveill. 2015;20(17)
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Communicable Diseases, Emerging - epidemiology - virology
Denmark - epidemiology
Enterovirus D, Human - classification - genetics
Enterovirus Infections - epidemiology - virology
Female
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Phylogeny
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology - virology
Abstract
From June 2014 through February 2015, respiratory samples from 130 Danish patients were screened for enterovirus D68 (EV-D68). Fourteen EV-D68 cases were detected, of which 12 presented with respiratory symptoms, and eight had known underlying disease. The median age of EV-D68 cases was three years (interquartile range: 0–30 years). Acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) was not detected although Danish EV-D68 strains showed > 98% nt identity with EV-D68-strains from AFP cases from the United States and France.
PubMed ID
25955773 View in PubMed
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55 records – page 1 of 6.