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370 records – page 1 of 37.

[About non-specific prophylaxis of infections typical for organized groups].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117398
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2012 Nov;333(11):51-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
V V Valevskii
V V Alekseev
G G Mar'in
A A Sobolev
O A Gruzdeva
N N Tsapkova
A V Tutel'ian
G I Poriadina
T A Salmina
A Iu Riazanova
M A Sokolov
D V Sibilev
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2012 Nov;333(11):51-6
Date
Nov-2012
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Humans
Immunity, Cellular - drug effects
Immunity, Humoral - drug effects
Military Personnel
Plant Preparations - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Pyoderma - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Russia
Seasons
Abstract
Respiratory tract infections and pyodermia are typical for personnel doing military service under conscription. Risk of progression of these infections is connected with activation of carry-over of causative agents among military personnel during replacement and decrease in immunity of conscripts. Usage of medication "Karmolis Kapli" for the purpose of prophylaxis allows to reduce cases of respiratory tract infections among the military personnel. Among the military servicemen who had take "Karmolis Kapli" was noted reduction of community-acquired pneumonia, tonsillitis and pyodermia morbidity. Non-specific protective effect of medication "Karmolis Kapli" is conditioned by increase of the common resistance of the body. For the purpose of prophylaxis it is necessary to use this medication during the personnel formation before the beginning of seasonal morbidity.
PubMed ID
23301292 View in PubMed
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Activity of telithromycin and comparators against isolates of Legionella pneumophila collected from patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infections: PROTEKT Years 1-5.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78204
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2007 Jul;13(7):743-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2007
Author
Dunbar L M
Farrell D J
Author Affiliation
LSU Health Science Center, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. ldunba@lsuhsc.edu
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2007 Jul;13(7):743-6
Date
Jul-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Humans
Ketolides - pharmacology
Legionella pneumophila - drug effects - isolation & purification
Legionnaires' Disease - epidemiology - microbiology
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
World Health
Abstract
The in-vitro activity of telithromycin and comparator antibacterial agents was determined against clinical isolates of Legionella pneumophila collected in the PROTEKT surveillance study. In total, 133 isolates were collected between 1999 and 2004 from 13 countries (Australia, Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Portugal, Spain, Sweden and the USA). MICs were determined by broth microdilution. Telithromycin maintained activity between Year 1 (MIC(90) 0.015 mg/L) and Year 5 (MIC(90) 0.03 mg/L), as did the comparator antibacterial agents. Telithromycin appears to be a candidate for coverage of legionellosis in the empirical treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infection.
PubMed ID
17403130 View in PubMed
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Acute infections and environmental exposure to organochlorines in Inuit infants from Nunavik.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4455
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):1359-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Frédéric Dallaire
Eric Dewailly
Gina Muckle
Carole Vézina
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Pierre Ayotte
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, and Public Health Research Unit, CHUQ-Laval University Medical Center, 945 Wolfe Street, Sainte-Foy, Québec G1V 5B3, Canada.
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2004 Oct;112(14):1359-65
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Cohort Studies
Dichlorodiphenyl Dichloroethylene - analysis - poisoning
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - poisoning
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Insecticides - analysis - poisoning
Inuits
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - etiology
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - analysis - poisoning
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - etiology
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The Inuit population of Nunavik (Canada) is exposed to immunotoxic organochlorines (OCs) mainly through the consumption of fish and marine mammal fat. We investigated the effect of perinatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) on the incidence of acute infections in Inuit infants. We reviewed the medical charts of a cohort of 199 Inuit infants during the first 12 months of life and evaluated the incidence rates of upper and lower respiratory tract infections (URTI and LRTIs, respectively), otitis media, and gastrointestinal (GI) infections. Maternal plasma during delivery and infant plasma at 7 months of age were sampled and assayed for PCBs and DDE. Compared to rates for infants in the first quartile of exposure to PCBs (least exposed), adjusted rate ratios for infants in higher quartiles ranged between 1.09 and 1.32 for URTIs, 0.99 and 1.39 for otitis, 1.52 and 1.89 for GI infections, and 1.16 and 1.68 for LRTIs during the first 6 months of follow-up. For all infections combined, the rate ratios ranged from 1.17 to 1.27. The effect size was similar for DDE exposure but was lower for the full 12-month follow-up. Globally, most rate ratios were > 1.0, but few were statistically significant (p
PubMed ID
15471725 View in PubMed
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[Acute morbidity and risk factors in Telemark 1870-1900].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183964
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 14;123(15):2086-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-14-2003
Author
Asbjørn Storesund
Author Affiliation
Institutt for allmenn- og samfunnsmedisin, Universitetet i Oslo, Postboks 1130 Blindern, 0318 Oslo. asbjorn.storesund@hit.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 14;123(15):2086-90
Date
Aug-14-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - history - mortality - transmission
Disease Outbreaks - history
Food Habits
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - history - mortality
Health status
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Hygiene - history
Norway - epidemiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - history - mortality
Risk factors
Sanitation - history
Abstract
In spite of methodological problems it has been concluded that Norwegian health statistics on acute morbidity in the late 19th century reflect genuine nation-wide health differences, a fact which calls for studies on living conditions in the areas concerned.
Data on morbidity have been extracted from the annual medical reports from seven health districts in Telemark between 1870 and 1900. The incidence of widespread contagious diseases in two selected groups is calculated.
Illness increased in Skien health district throughout the period, while in Kragerø it declined from about 1885. The occurrence of acute gastrointestinal infections was higher in Skien and Kragerø than in the five rural districts. Remotely located rural districts had fewer outbreaks of epidemic diseases than the more central districts.
High occurrence of acute infections appears to have been related to extensive migration and a high level of through traffic. High population density combined with poor sanitary conditions seems to be a main cause of acute gastrointestinal infections. No obvious connections were found between health status and standards of general hygiene, diet and economic boom periods. It has not been possible to document any evident effects of public health work an acute morbidity, a few diseases of minor importance disregarded.
PubMed ID
12934143 View in PubMed
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Acute respiratory infections among Indigenous children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104234
Source
Med J Aust. 2014 Jun 2;200(10):559-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2-2014
Author
Paul J Torzillo
Anne B Chang
Author Affiliation
Department of Respiratory Medicine and Department of Intensive Care, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. paul.torzillo@sydney.edu.au.
Source
Med J Aust. 2014 Jun 2;200(10):559-60
Date
Jun-2-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Notes
Comment On: Med J Aust. 2014 Jun 2;200(10):591-424882491
PubMed ID
24882472 View in PubMed
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Acute respiratory symptoms and general illness during the first year of life: a population-based birth cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86241
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2008 Jun;43(6):584-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
von Linstow Marie-Louise
Holst Klaus Kähler
Larsen Karina
Koch Anders
Andersen Per Kragh
Høgh Birthe
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Hvidovre Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. linstow@dadlnet.dk
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2008 Jun;43(6):584-93
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Interviews as Topic
Logistic Models
Male
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Risk factors
Abstract
Respiratory symptoms are common in infancy. Most illnesses occurring among children are dealt with by parents and do not require medical attention. Nevertheless, few studies have prospectively and on a community-basis assessed the amount of respiratory symptoms and general illness in normal infants. In this population-based birth cohort study, 228 healthy infants from Copenhagen, Denmark were followed from birth to 1 year of age during 2004-2006. Symptoms were registered using daily diaries and monthly home visits. Interviews were performed at inclusion and every second month. Risk factor analysis was carried out by multiple logistic regression analysis. On average, children had general symptoms for 3.5 months during their first year of life, nasal discharge being most frequent followed by cough. Frequency of all symptoms increased steeply after 6 months of age. Each child had on average 6.3 episodes (median: 5.1, inter-quartile range (IQR): 3.3-7.8) of acute respiratory tract illness (ARTI) (nasal discharge and > or = 1 of the following symptoms: cough, fever, wheezing, tachypnea, malaise, or lost appetite) and 5.6 episodes (median: 4.3, IQR: 2.1-7.3) of simple rhinitis per 365 days at risk. Determinants for respiratory symptoms were increasing age, winter season, household size, size of residence, day-care attendance, and having siblings aged 1-3 years attending a day nursery. In conclusion, the present study provides detailed data on the occurrence of disease symptoms during the first year of life in a general population cohort and emphasizes the impact of increasing age, seasonality, and living conditions on the occurrence of ARTI.
PubMed ID
18435478 View in PubMed
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Acute respiratory tract infections in children. A three-year follow-up from birth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature37729
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1990 Apr;79(4):402-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
G. Harsten
K. Prellner
J. Heldrup
O. Kalm
R. Kornfält
Author Affiliation
Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1990 Apr;79(4):402-9
Date
Apr-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Age Factors
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Humans
Infant
Longitudinal Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Risk factors
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in small children account for a considerable proportion of health care expenditure. In 113 children, followed for the first three years of life, we studied the frequency of acute RTI and its relationship to the factors: type of day-care, age, sex, family size, living conditions, allergic predisposition, family smoking habits, and season. To elucidate the influence of age, the frequency of acute RTI and its relationship to type of day-care was longitudinally studied on a quarterly basis. The frequency of acute RTI diagnosis increased gradually from birth culminating in a peak at the beginning of the second year. Besides age and season, type of day-care was the only factor studied to show any relationship with the frequency of acute RTI diagnosis. Up to the age of almost 2 1/2 years, children attending day-care centres accounted for more RTI diagnoses than did those in home care or family day-care, categories with comparable frequencies.
PubMed ID
2349876 View in PubMed
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[ADENOVIRUSES IN THE ETIOLOGICAL STRUCTURE OF ACUTE RESPIRATORY VIRAL INFECTION IN MOSCOW IN 2004 - 2014].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270386
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2015 Sep-Oct;(5):50-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
S B Yatsyshina
M R Ageeva
N S Vorobieva
A V Valdokhina
M A Elkina
A V Gorelov
V V Maleev
V I Pokrovsky
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2015 Sep-Oct;(5):50-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoviridae - classification - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - pathology - virology
Russia
Abstract
Study prevalence of adenovirus species and serotypes that had caused acute respiratory viral infection (ARVI) in Moscow in 2004 - 2014.
Material from respiratory tract of 4731 patients with ARVI and 663 conditionally healthy children and adults was used. ARVI causative agents were detected by PCR with real-time detection using AmpliSens reagent kits (CRIE, Moscow). Membership of adenoviruses to a certain serotype was determined by sequencing of hexon gene segment. Adenoviruses that had caused ARD in servicemen in 2010 - 2014 were also studied.
ARVI causative agents were detected in 64.6% ill children and 58% of adults. Respiratory-syncytial and rhinoviruses prevailed in children, influenza A virus--in adults. Adenoviruses were detected in 6.9% of ill children and 2.9% of adults during the whole year, with a rise in October-December. B and C species occurred at an equal frequency, E species was found less often. Serotypes 3 and 2 prevailed in 34% and 21% of cases of adenovirus mono-infection, respectively, serotypes 7, 6 and 4 occurred less often. 4 out of 5 outbreaks of adenovirus infection in servicemen were caused by serotype 7. Adenoviruses were absent in the group of healthy adults, in conditionally healthy children were detected in 0.4% of cases and were attributed to serotypes 1 and 2.
Etiological structure of ARVI was studied for the last decade. Adenovirus infection ranked 5th in children and 7th in adults. 9 serotypes of 3 species of respiratory adenoviruses were identified. Varying prevalence of species and serotypes depending in season, clinical diagnosis and patient age was demonstrated.
PubMed ID
26829854 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations as a measure of a healthy diet and upper respiratory tract infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140653
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 May;14(5):860-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Elinor Fondell
Sara E Christensen
Olle Bälter
Katarina Bälter
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Nobels vag 12a, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. Elinor.Fondell@ki.se
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 May;14(5):860-9
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena - physiology
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The Nordic countries have published joint dietary recommendations, the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR), since 1980. We evaluated adherence to the NNR as a measure of a healthy diet and its potential association with self-reported upper respiratory tract infection (URTI).
A prospective, population-based study with a follow-up period of 4 months. Dietary intake was assessed using a semi-quantitative FFQ with ninety-six items, along with other lifestyle factors, at baseline. URTI was assessed every three weeks. A Poisson regression model was used to control for age, sex and other confounding factors.
A middle-sized county in northern Sweden.
Swedish men and women (n 1509) aged 20-60 years.
The NNR include recommendations on macronutrient proportions, physical activity and intake of micronutrients, sodium, fibre and alcohol. We found that overall adherence to the NNR was moderately good. In addition, we found that high adherence to the NNR (>5·5 adherence points) was not associated with a lower risk of URTI (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 0·89, 95% CI 0·73, 1·08) compared with low adherence (
PubMed ID
20854722 View in PubMed
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Age specific prevalence of antibodies against Chlamydia pneumoniae in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35988
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1994;26(4):393-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
S. Einarsson
H K Sigurdsson
S D Magnusdottir
H. Erlendsdottir
H. Briem
S. Gudmundsson
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland Medical School, Reykjavik.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1994;26(4):393-7
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - immunology
Antibodies, Bacterial - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Chlamydia Infections - epidemiology - immunology
Chlamydophila pneumoniae - immunology
Female
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Immunoglobulin G - analysis
Immunoglobulin M - analysis
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Chlamydia pneumoniae is a newly recognized common cause of respiratory tract infections. The aim of this study was to examine its prevalence in Iceland. The study was based on 1020 serum samples from individuals 0-99 years old. The samples were divided into 10-year age groups. IgG and IgM antibodies were determined with microimmunofluorescence assay. An IgG titer > or = 32 and IgM titer > or = 16 were considered positive. The prevalence of positive IgG titer in the study population was 53 +/- 16% (mean +/- SD, age group range 14-66%). Neither seasonal nor gender-based difference in IgG antibody prevalence was demonstrated. It was lowest in the youngest group, 0-9 years old (p
PubMed ID
7984969 View in PubMed
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370 records – page 1 of 37.