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Asthma and atopy in schoolchildren in a defined population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211373
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1996 Aug;85(8):965-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1996
Author
S T Remes
M. Korppi
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Kuopio University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1996 Aug;85(8):965-70
Date
Aug-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Male
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Diseases - complications - epidemiology - immunology
Skin Tests
Abstract
We investigated the frequency of allergic disorders, the pattern of allergen sensitization and serum total IgE concentration in a population-based sample of schoolchildren screened on the basis of respiratory symptoms (N = 244). The children were classified on clinical grounds into three groups, asthma (N = 43), other symptoms from lower airways (OSLA; N = 34) and control children (N = 167). The frequency of allergic disorders (allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis or dermatitis) differed significantly between children with asthma (81%), children with OSLA (62%) and in control children (48%) (p
PubMed ID
8863880 View in PubMed
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Does smoking cause low back pain? Results from a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67678
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1996 Feb;19(2):99-108
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
C. Leboeuf-Yde
A. Yashin
T. Lauritzen
Author Affiliation
Nordic Institute for Chiropractic and Clinical Biomechanics, Odense, Denmark.
Source
J Manipulative Physiol Ther. 1996 Feb;19(2):99-108
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Incidence
Low Back Pain - complications - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Respiratory Tract Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sex Distribution
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate (a) whether there is a causal link between smoking and low back pain (LBP), (b) whether smoking is uniquely associated with symptoms in the lumbar spine and (c) the role of respiratory problems in the possible link between smoking and LBP. STUDY DESIGN: Data were collected through questionnaires in a cross-sectional study of a representative sample of the general Danish population, consisting of 1370 men and women aged 30-50 yr, with a response rate of 69%. BACKGROUND: In some epidemiological studies (mostly those of cross-sectional design) smoking has been associated with LBP; this association, however, is not consistently present in all reports. Several theories exist that attempt to explain a possible association between the two; only rarely have these theories been systematically tested. However, cross-sectional data can also be used to obtain answers to questions relating to causes and mechanisms. METHOD: A list of expectations was produced that related to three hypotheses previously forwarded in the epidemiological literature. The fit of the data in the present study was then considered in the light of these expectations. RESULTS: There is evidence in favor of a causal link between smoking and some definitions of LBP. Smoking was not uniquely associated with the lumbar spine. Respiratory symptoms seemed to be positively associated with LBP but only when linked with smoking. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical significance of these findings is limited, but it needs to be considered in future research. Abstinence from smoking may, however, be a useful means of primary prevention of certain types of LBP.
PubMed ID
9064317 View in PubMed
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Eczema among adults: prevalence, risk factors and relation to airway diseases. Results from a large-scale population survey in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126618
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2012 Jun;166(6):1301-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
E P Rönmark
L. Ekerljung
J. Lötvall
G. Wennergren
E. Rönmark
K. Torén
B. Lundbäck
Author Affiliation
Krefting Research Centre, Department of Internal Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 424, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden. erik.ronmark@gu.se
Source
Br J Dermatol. 2012 Jun;166(6):1301-8
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Eczema - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Rhinitis - complications - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
In contrast to asthma and rhinitis, few studies among adults investigating the prevalence and risk factors of eczema have been published.
To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of eczema among adults in West Sweden. A further aim was to study the associations between asthma, rhinitis and eczema.
A questionnaire on respiratory health was mailed in 2008 to 30,000 randomly selected subjects in West Sweden aged 16-75 years; 62% responded. The questionnaire included questions about eczema, respiratory symptoms and diseases and their possible determinants. A subgroup of 669 subjects underwent skin prick testing against common airborne allergens.
'Eczema ever' was reported by 40·7% and 'current eczema' by 11·5%. Both conditions were significantly more common among women. The prevalence decreased with increasing age. The coexistence of both asthma and rhinitis with eczema was common. The main risk factors were family history of allergy and asthma. The dominant environmental risk factor was occupational exposure to gas, dust or fumes. Smoking increased the risk. Eczema was associated with urbanization, while growing up on a farm was associated with a decreased risk. Added one by one to the multivariate model, asthma, allergic rhinitis and any positive skin prick test were associated with eczema.
Eczema among adults is a common disease with more women than men having and having had eczema. Eczema is associated with other atopic diseases and with airway symptoms. Hereditary factors and exposure to gas, dust and fumes are associated with eczema.
PubMed ID
22372948 View in PubMed
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Lung cancer risk in never-smokers: a population-based case-control study of epidemiologic risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142873
Source
BMC Cancer. 2010;10:285
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Darren R Brenner
Rayjean J Hung
Ming-Sound Tsao
Frances A Shepherd
Michael R Johnston
Steven Narod
Warren Rubenstein
John R McLaughlin
Author Affiliation
Prosserman Centre for Health Research, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, 60 Murray St, Toronto M5T3L9, Canada.
Source
BMC Cancer. 2010;10:285
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Genetic Testing
Humans
Logistic Models
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Odds Ratio
Ontario - epidemiology
Pedigree
Respiratory Tract Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Urban health
Young Adult
Abstract
We conducted a case-control study in the greater Toronto area to evaluate potential lung cancer risk factors including environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure, family history of cancer, indoor air pollution, workplace exposures and history of previous respiratory diseases with special consideration given to never smokers.
445 cases (35% of which were never smokers oversampled by design) between the ages of 20-84 were identified through four major tertiary care hospitals in metropolitan Toronto between 1997 and 2002 and were frequency matched on sex and ethnicity with 425 population controls and 523 hospital controls. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the associations between exposures and lung cancer risk.
Any previous exposure to occupational exposures (OR total population 1.6, 95% CI 1.4-2.1, OR never smokers 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.3), a previous diagnosis of emphysema in the total population (OR 4.8, 95% CI 2.0-11.1) or a first degree family member with a previous cancer diagnosis before age 50 among never smokers (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.0-3.2) were associated with increased lung cancer risk.
Occupational exposures and family history of cancer with young onset were important risk factors among never smokers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20546590 View in PubMed
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A National Population Study of the Co-Occurrence of Multiple Long-Term Conditions in People With Multimorbidity, Denmark, 2013.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278368
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2016 Jan 28;13:E12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-28-2016
Author
Karina Friis
Marie Hauge Pedersen
Finn Breinholt Larsen
Mathias Lasgaard
Source
Prev Chronic Dis. 2016 Jan 28;13:E12
Date
Jan-28-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arthritis - complications - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Delivery of Health Care
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Respiratory Tract Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of pairwise combinations of 17 long-term conditions. Data were obtained from a national, representative population-based study including 162,283 Danish citizens aged 16 years or older. We calculated the prevalence of each long-term condition given the presence of another long-term condition. Compared with the general population, people with angina pectoris had more than twice the odds of having 12 of the 16 other long-term conditions, and inversely, people with cancer, tinnitus, or cataracts did not have notably higher odds for any of the other long-term conditions.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26820044 View in PubMed
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[Prevalence of somatic diseases in children with endemic goiter].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217849
Source
Probl Endokrinol (Mosk). 1994 Jul-Aug;40(4):14-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
E P Kasatkina
L A Lisenkova
L A Shchepliagina
N V Bolotova
N A Kurmacheva
T V Glukhova
E P Kakorina
N M Martynov
Source
Probl Endokrinol (Mosk). 1994 Jul-Aug;40(4):14-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Distribution
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Digestive System Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Female
Goiter, Endemic - complications
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Musculoskeletal Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Respiratory Tract Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
A total of 1649 children aged 0 to 16 years were examined in the Khvalynsk district of the Saratov region endemic for goiter. Age-specific features of prevalence of goiter and chronic somatic diseases were studied. Goiter was found to form starting from the first years of life, with its morbidity peaks observed at the age of 3, 5, 7, and 12. Disease incidence in children with endemic goiter was found to be higher than in those without thyroid abnormalities.
PubMed ID
7971899 View in PubMed
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Severe early lower respiratory tract infection is associated with subsequent respiratory morbidity in preschool Inuit children in Nunavut, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136305
Source
J Asthma. 2011 Apr;48(3):241-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Thomas Andrew Kovesi
Zhirong Cao
Geraldine Osborne
Grace M Egeland
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada. kovesi@cheo.on.ca
Source
J Asthma. 2011 Apr;48(3):241-7
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Bronchiolitis - complications - epidemiology - etiology
Canada - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
Community Health Centers
Cough - epidemiology - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Morbidity
Pneumonia - complications - epidemiology - etiology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Respiratory Tract Diseases - complications - epidemiology - etiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications - epidemiology - etiology
Risk
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Inuit children in Nunavut, Canada, have high rates of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) early in life. Whether this commonly results in chronic respiratory symptoms later in life is unknown.
A cross-sectional survey of 3- to 5-years-old Inuit children was conducted in all three regions of Nunavut, as part of the "Qanuippitali, what about us, how are we?" survey.
Reported chronic cough and wheezing were common in preschool Inuit children, although reported asthma diagnosed by a healthcare professional was uncommon. The presence of smokers in the home tended to be associated with severe LRTI in the first 2 years of life. Reported wheezing as well as reported bronchitis or pneumonia in the previous 12 months was significantly associated with severe LRTI in the first 2 years of life. Reported wheezing was also strongly associated with reported bronchitis or pneumonia in the past 12 months. The prevalence of chronic moist cough could not be clearly assessed, due to limitations in the questionnaire.
Severe LRTI in the first 2 years of life was associated with ongoing respiratory morbidity in preschool Inuit children, although symptoms appeared to lessen in severity over time.
PubMed ID
21391880 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.