Skip header and navigation

Refine By

38 records – page 1 of 4.

Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Jul-Aug;(4):28-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu I Grigor'ev
A V Ershov
I I Silin
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Jul-Aug;(4):28-31
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air - analysis - standards
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Child
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Morbidity - trends
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Rural Population
Russia
Urban Population
Abstract
The paper discusses whether air quality can be hygienically and ecologically tested from respiratory disease mortality rates in children.
PubMed ID
20873265 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Ambient air pollution and human health in the town of Nizhnekamsk].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature188786
Source
Gig Sanit. 2002 May-Jun;(3):12-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
F F Dautov
R F Khakimova
N G Gabitov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2002 May-Jun;(3):12-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Chemical Industry
Child, Preschool
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Industrial Waste - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Skin Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Water - analysis
Abstract
The paper gives hygienic characteristics of ambient air pollution and examines human health in the town of Nizhnekamsk. There are worse demographic indices. In the structure of morbidity, respiratory diseases make up the largest proportion (44.4%), injuries and poisoning rank next (16.9%), skin and skin fate occupy the third place (5.4%). There are the highest morbidity rates in the polluted areas of the town. In these areas, respiratory allergoses (preasthma and bronchial asthma) occur more frequently than in the controls.
PubMed ID
12198892 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessment of long-term exposure to air pollution in a longitudinal national health survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142360
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2011 Jul-Aug;21(4):337-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
Mireille Guay
David M Stieb
Marc Smith-Doiron
Author Affiliation
Population Studies Division, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9.
Source
J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol. 2011 Jul-Aug;21(4):337-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Canada - epidemiology
Carbon Monoxide - analysis
Cardiovascular Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Child
Cities - epidemiology
Demography
Environmental Monitoring - methods - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiological Monitoring
Health Surveys
Humans
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis
Ozone - analysis
Particulate Matter - analysis
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk assessment
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Self-reported data on the municipality of residence were used to assess long-term exposure to outdoor air pollution from 1980 to 2002 in the longitudinal Canadian National Population Health Survey. Exposure to carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, sulfur dioxide, and particulate matter was determined using data obtained from fixed-site air pollution monitors operated principally in urban areas. Four different methods of attributing pollution exposure were used based on residence in (1) 1980, (2) 1994, (3) 1980 and 1994, and (4) at all locations between 1980 and 2002. Between 1,693 and 4,274 of 10,515 members of the cohort could be assigned exposures to individual pollutants using these methods. On average, subjects spent 71.4% of the 1980-2002 period in the census subdivision where they lived in 1980. A single exposure measure in 1980 or 1994 or a mean of the two measures was highly correlated (r>0.7, P
PubMed ID
20606704 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between ambient particulate sulfate and admissions to Ontario hospitals for cardiac and respiratory diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214790
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Jul 1;142(1):15-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1995
Author
R T Burnett
R. Dales
D. Krewski
R. Vincent
T. Dann
J R Brook
Author Affiliation
Health Protection Branch, Health Canada, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1995 Jul 1;142(1):15-22
Date
Jul-1-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Heart Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Ozone
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Seasons
Sulfates - adverse effects - analysis
Abstract
The association of daily cardiac and respiratory admissions to 168 acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada, with daily levels of particulate sulfates was examined over the 6-year period 1983-1988. Sulfate levels were recorded at nine monitoring stations in regions of southern and central Ontario spanned by three monitoring networks. A 13-micrograms/m3 increase in sulfates recorded on the day prior to admission (the 95th percentile) was associated with a 3.7% (p
PubMed ID
7785669 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Atmospheric pollution and health of students].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251940
Source
Can J Public Health. 1975 Sep-Oct;66(5):399-405
Publication Type
Article

Child health level in Moscow as related to ambient air pollution.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218141
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1994 May 30;148(1):57-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-30-1994
Author
B A Revich
Author Affiliation
Department of Demography and Human Ecology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Krasikova.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1994 May 30;148(1):57-60
Date
May-30-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Health status
Humans
Moscow - epidemiology
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
Ambient air in Moscow is characterised by high concentrations of nitric oxide and other pollutants. The level of air pollution varies from one neighbourhood of the city to another. This accounts for the variability of child health levels. In the most severely polluted areas the prevalence of childhood bronchial asthma is much higher; cases of dis-harmonious physical development among children are more frequent. A map of Moscow depicting the degrees of environmental hazards has been established on the basis of interrelated studies of ambient air quality and child health levels.
PubMed ID
8016639 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cholinesterase inhibitors and adverse pulmonary events in older people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and concomitant dementia: a population-based, cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127005
Source
Drugs Aging. 2012 Mar 1;29(3):213-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2012
Author
Anne Stephenson
Dallas P Seitz
Hadas D Fischer
Andrea Gruneir
Chaim M Bell
Andrea S Gershon
Longdi Fu
Geoff M Anderson
Peter C Austin
Paula A Rochon
Sudeep S Gill
Author Affiliation
Women's College Research Institute, Women's College Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. stephensona@smh.ca
Source
Drugs Aging. 2012 Mar 1;29(3):213-23
Date
Mar-1-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholinesterase Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual
Dementia - complications - drug therapy
Drug Prescriptions
Electronic Health Records
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Nootropic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Ontario - epidemiology
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - complications - physiopathology - therapy
Pulmonary Ventilation - drug effects
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) are a mainstay treatment for individuals with dementia. ChEIs may worsen airflow obstruction because of their pro-cholinergic properties.
The objective of this study was to evaluate the risk of serious pulmonary complications in the elderly with concomitant chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and dementia who were receiving ChEIs.
This was a population-based, cohort study conducted between 2003 and 2010 in residents of Ontario, Canada. Subjects were over the age of 66 years and had concomitant dementia and COPD, identified using linked administrative databases. Exposure to ChEIs was determined using a drug benefits database. The primary outcome was an emergency room (ER) visit or hospitalization for COPD. The risk difference at 60 days and the relative risk (RR) for study outcomes were estimated in the propensity score-matched sample.
Of 266,840 individuals with COPD, 45,503 had a concomitant diagnosis of dementia. A total of 7166 unexposed subjects were matched to subjects newly exposed to ChEIs. New users of ChEIs were not at significantly higher risk of ER visits or hospitalizations for COPD (RR 0.90; 95% CI 0.76, 1.07) or COPD exacerbations (RR 1.02; 95% CI 0.91, 1.15). Furthermore, ER visits for any respiratory diagnoses were not increased among new users of ChEIs (RR 1.02; 95% CI 0.87, 1.19) when compared with non-users. Sub-group analyses were consistent with the main analysis.
In a large cohort of elderly individuals with COPD and dementia, new users of ChEIs had a similar risk for adverse pulmonary outcomes as those who were not receiving ChEIs.
PubMed ID
22332932 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical manifestations and incidence of oculo-respiratory syndrome following influenza vaccination--Quebec, 2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194421
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2001 May 15;27(10):85-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2001

A comparison of methods for the analysis of recurrent health outcome data with environmental covariates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169905
Source
Stat Med. 2007 Feb 10;26(3):532-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-2007
Author
Karen Y Fung
Shahedul Khan
Daniel Krewski
Tim Ramsay
Author Affiliation
Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ont., Canada N9B 3P4. kfung@uwindsor.ca
Source
Stat Med. 2007 Feb 10;26(3):532-45
Date
Feb-10-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Air Pollutants - poisoning
British Columbia - epidemiology
Computer simulation
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Hospitalization
Humans
Models, Biological
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Abstract
Recurrent events such as repeated hospital admissions for the same health outcome occur frequently in environmental health studies. Dewanji and Moolgavkar proposed a flexible parametric model and a conditional likelihood analysis for recurrent events based on a Poisson process formulation. In this paper, we examine the statistical properties of the Dewanji-Moolgavkar (DM) estimator of the risk of an adverse health outcome associated with environmental exposures based on recurrent event data using computer simulation. We also compare the DM approach with both case-crossover analysis for multiple observations and time series analysis when there are no subject-specific covariates. When using a correctly specified model, the DM method produced better estimates with respect to relative mean square error when each subject had constant or curved baseline intensity functions than it did when baseline intensities were increasing or decreasing in a linear fashion. For under-specified models, the DM method outperformed case-crossover analysis for decreasing straight line intensity functions, was outperformed by case-crossover analysis for increasing straight line intensity functions, and was roughly equivalent to case-crossover analysis for constant and curved intensity functions. Case-crossover analysis produced superior risk estimates more frequently than the other two methods in the cases considered here, especially for linear representations of the baseline intensities.
PubMed ID
16596578 View in PubMed
Less detail

38 records – page 1 of 4.