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[Abnormal respiration in a young infant]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58349
Source
Duodecim. 2003;119(19):1845, 1847
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003

Beyond randomized controlled trials: a "real life" experience of respiratory syncytial virus infection prevention in infancy with and without palivizumab.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166927
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2006 Dec;41(12):1167-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Ian Mitchell
Suzanne Tough
Lynne Gillis
Carina Majaesic
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2006 Dec;41(12):1167-74
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Antibodies, Monoclonal - therapeutic use
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Prevalence
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Seasons
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
A population-based study of the impact of palivizumab on confirmed Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) hospitalizations over a 7-year period within and between two similar health regions . Clinicians in Calgary implemented palivizumab prophylaxis for high-risk infants during the last four RSV seasons; clinicians in Edmonton did not. The two cities are part of a unified health care system and similar sociodemographics. Infants
PubMed ID
17058279 View in PubMed
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The Burden of Human Metapneumovirus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections in Hospitalized Norwegian Children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285620
Source
J Infect Dis. 2017 Jul 01;216(1):110-116
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-01-2017
Author
Nina Moe
Inger Heimdal Stenseng
Sidsel Krokstad
Andreas Christensen
Lars Høsøien Skanke
Kari Ravndal Risnes
Svein Arne Nordbø
Henrik Døllner
Source
J Infect Dis. 2017 Jul 01;216(1):110-116
Date
Jul-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Hospitalized
Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Metapneumovirus - isolation & purification
Norway - epidemiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - epidemiology
Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human - isolation & purification
Respiratory Tract Infections - diagnosis - virology
Abstract
The burden of severe human metapneumovirus (HMPV) respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in European children has not been clarified. We assessed HMPV in Norwegian children and compared hospitalization rates for HMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).
We prospectively enrolled children (
PubMed ID
28838133 View in PubMed
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Change in respiratory syncytial virus seasonality in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature309995
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2020 01; 109(1):202-203
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2020
Author
Marjo Renko
Terhi Tapiainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2020 01; 109(1):202-203
Date
01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - epidemiology
Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human
Seasons
PubMed ID
31441534 View in PubMed
Less detail

Clinical and Socioeconomic Burden of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283226
Source
J Infect Dis. 2017 Jan 01;215(1):17-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-01-2017
Author
Terho Heikkinen
Emilia Ojala
Matti Waris
Source
J Infect Dis. 2017 Jan 01;215(1):17-23
Date
Jan-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - economics - epidemiology
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Cost of Illness
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Nose - virology
Otitis Media - virology
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - complications - economics - epidemiology - virology
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines
Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human - isolation & purification
Risk factors
Seasons
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Vaccines and antivirals against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are being developed, but there are scarce data on the full impact of RSV infection on outpatient children.
We analyzed the burden of RSV illness in a prospective cohort study of children aged =13 years during 2 consecutive respiratory seasons in Turku, Finland (2231 child-seasons of follow-up). We examined the children and obtained nasal swabs for the detection of RSV during each respiratory illness. The parents filled out daily symptom diaries throughout the study.
Of 6001 medically attended respiratory infections, 302 (5%) were caused by RSV. Per 1000 children, the average annual RSV infection incidence rates among children aged
PubMed ID
27738052 View in PubMed
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A comparative study of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) prophylaxis in premature infants within the Canadian Registry of Palivizumab (CARESS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124798
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Oct;31(10):2703-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
B. Paes
I. Mitchell
A. Li
K L Lanctôt
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Oct;31(10):2703-11
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized - administration & dosage
Antiviral Agents - administration & dosage
Birth weight
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Age
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Pregnancy
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - virology
Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human - pathogenicity
Seasons
Smoking - adverse effects
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We examined the dosing regimens, compliance, and outcomes of premature infants who received palivizumab within the Canadian Registry of Palivizumab (CARESS). Infants receiving =1 dose of palivizumab during the 2006-2011 respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) seasons were recruited across 30 sites. Respiratory illness events were captured monthly. Infants =32 completed weeks gestational age (GA) (Group 1) were compared to 33-35 completed weeks GA infants (Group 2) following prophylaxis. In total, 6,654 patients were analyzed (Group 1, n?=?5,183; Group 2, n?=?1,471). The mean GA was 29.9?±?2.9 versus 34.2?±?2.2 weeks for Groups 1 and 2, respectively. Group differences were significant (all p-values 5 household individuals, birth weight, and enrolment age. Overall, infants received 92.6 % of expected injections. Group 1 received significantly more injections, but a greater proportion of Group 2 received injections within recommended intervals. The hospitalization rates were similar for Groups 1 and 2 for respiratory illness (4.7 % vs. 3.7 %, p?=?0.1) and RSV (1.5 % vs. 1.4 %, p?=?0.3). Neither the time to first respiratory illness [hazard ratio?=?0.9, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.7-1.2, p?=?0.5] nor to first RSV hospitalization (hazard ratio?=?1.3, 95 % CI 0.8-2.2, p?=?0.3) were different. Compliance with RSV prophylaxis is high. Despite the higher number of palivizumab doses in infants =32 completed weeks GA, the two groups' respiratory illness and RSV-positive hospitalization rates were similar.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22546928 View in PubMed
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Comparing Human Metapneumovirus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Viral Co-Detections, Genotypes and Risk Factors for Severe Disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285085
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(1):e0170200
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Nina Moe
Sidsel Krokstad
Inger Heimdal Stenseng
Andreas Christensen
Lars Høsøien Skanke
Kari Ravndal Risnes
Svein Arne Nordbø
Henrik Døllner
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(1):e0170200
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Hospitalized
Child, Preschool
Coinfection - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
DNA, Viral - genetics
Female
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Male
Metapneumovirus - genetics - isolation & purification
Norway - epidemiology
Paramyxoviridae Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human - genetics - isolation & purification
Respiratory Tract Infections - virology
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
It is unclarified as to whether viral co-detection and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) genotypes relate to clinical manifestations in children with HMPV and lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), and if the clinical course and risk factors for severe LRTI differ between HMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).
We prospectively enrolled hospitalized children aged
Notes
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PubMed ID
28095451 View in PubMed
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Consumption of asthma medication after RS-virus epidemic--a population based survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78560
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2007 Mar;18(2):105-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2007
Author
Dunder Teija
Juntti Hanna
Renko Marjo
Kokkonen Jorma
Waris Matti
Uhari Matti
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. teija.dunder@oulu.fi
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2007 Mar;18(2):105-9
Date
Mar-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - complications - epidemiology
Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human
Abstract
It has been suggested that a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in infancy increases the likelihood of development of asthma in childhood. The RSV epidemics have a special 2-yr pattern in Finland and this allows the evaluation of the association of RSV and asthma by epidemiological means. We evaluated whether being 0-6 months of age during an RSV epidemic has an impact on the use of asthma medication later in the childhood. The consumption of asthma medication at the age of 3-16 yr and the number of those entitled to special reimbursement for asthma medication were identified for a total of 637,922 children. These subjects were grouped in cohorts according to whether they had been aged 0-6 months (exposed) or not (unexposed) during an RSV epidemic. The means of the proportions taking asthma medication and of those receiving reimbursement were calculated for each cohort. The means of the proportions in the unexposed vs. exposed cohorts were 20.5% vs. 20.3% for consumption and 4.8% vs. 4.9% for reimbursement. These differences were insignificant. In conclusion exposure to a RSV epidemic in infancy does not increase the consumption of asthma medicines at the population level.
PubMed ID
17338782 View in PubMed
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Deposition of respiratory virus pathogens on frequently touched surfaces at airports.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295373
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2018 Aug 29; 18(1):437
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-29-2018
Author
Niina Ikonen
Carita Savolainen-Kopra
Joanne E Enstone
Ilpo Kulmala
Pertti Pasanen
Anniina Salmela
Satu Salo
Jonathan S Nguyen-Van-Tam
Petri Ruutu
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Security, National Institute for Health and Welfare, P.O.Box 30, 00271, Helsinki, Finland. niina.ikonen@thl.fi.
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2018 Aug 29; 18(1):437
Date
Aug-29-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adenoviridae - genetics - isolation & purification
Airports - standards - statistics & numerical data
Coronavirus - genetics - isolation & purification
Coronavirus Infections - transmission - virology
Equipment Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Influenza, Human - transmission - virology
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human - genetics - isolation & purification
Respiratory Tract Infections - transmission - virology
Rhinovirus - genetics - isolation & purification
Touch
Travel - statistics & numerical data
Travel-Related Illness
Viruses - genetics - isolation & purification
Abstract
International and national travelling has made the rapid spread of infectious diseases possible. Little information is available on the role of major traffic hubs, such as airports, in the transmission of respiratory infections, including seasonal influenza and a pandemic threat. We investigated the presence of respiratory viruses in the passenger environment of a major airport in order to identify risk points and guide measures to minimize transmission.
Surface and air samples were collected weekly at three different time points during the peak period of seasonal influenza in 2015-16 in Finland. Swabs from surface samples, and air samples were tested by real-time PCR for influenza A and B viruses, respiratory syncytial virus, adenovirus, rhinovirus and coronaviruses (229E, HKU1, NL63 and OC43).
Nucleic acid of at least one respiratory virus was detected in 9 out of 90 (10%) surface samples, including: a plastic toy dog in the children's playground (2/3 swabs, 67%); hand-carried luggage trays at the security check area (4/8, 50%); the buttons of the payment terminal at the pharmacy (1/2, 50%); the handrails of stairs (1/7, 14%); and the passenger side desk and divider glass at a passport control point (1/3, 33%). Among the 10 respiratory virus findings at various sites, the viruses identified were: rhinovirus (4/10, 40%, from surfaces); coronavirus (3/10, 30%, from surfaces); adenovirus (2/10, 20%, 1 air sample, 1 surface sample); influenza A (1/10, 10%, surface sample).
Detection of pathogen viral nucleic acids indicates respiratory viral surface contamination at multiple sites associated with high touch rates, and suggests a potential risk in the identified airport sites. Of the surfaces tested, plastic security screening trays appeared to pose the highest potential risk, and handling these is almost inevitable for all embarking passengers.
Notes
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PubMed ID
30157776 View in PubMed
Less detail

Detection of human metapneumovirus and respiratory syncytial virus by duplex real-time RT-PCR assay in comparison with direct fluorescent assay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145409
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2010 Oct;16(10):1568-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
P. Jokela
H. Piiparinen
K. Luiro
M. Lappalainen
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. pia.jokela@helsinki.fi
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2010 Oct;16(10):1568-73
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Direct - methods
Humans
Infant
Male
Metapneumovirus - isolation & purification
Middle Aged
Nasopharynx - virology
Paramyxoviridae Infections - diagnosis - virology
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - diagnosis - virology
Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human - isolation & purification
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Virology - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) and human metapneumovirus (hMPV) are important respiratory pathogens of small children and adults. The present study aimed to design a sensitive real-time RT-PCR assay for the detection of hRSV and hMPV in comparison with direct fluorescent assay (DFA) and to determine the incidence of hMPV and hRSV as causative agents of respiratory infections in a Finnish population. For DFA detection of hMPV antigen, four commercial antibodies were evaluated. The duplex real-time RT-PCR assay achieved a sensitivity of 10(3) copies/mL of specimen for hRSV and hMPV type A viruses and 10(4) copies/mL for type B hMPV. The detection rate of the RT-PCR assay was compared with those for DFA detection of hMPV and hRSV in analyses of 350 nasopharyngeal aspirates sent to HUSLAB, Helsinki University Hospital, for routine virus diagnostics during November 2007 to June 2008. Of the samples analyzed, 43 (12.3%) were positive for hRSV by DFA and an additional 13 specimens (3.7%) were positive for hRSV by RT-PCR. Only four samples (1.1 %) were found to be positive for hMPV RNA by RT-PCR, with two of them also positive by DFA. The duplex real-time RT-PCR assay described in the present study can therefore be applied for efficient identification of hMPV and hRSV in clinical specimens and collection of information on the epidemiology and clinical outcome of these viruses.
PubMed ID
20156219 View in PubMed
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38 records – page 1 of 4.