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[1998 Quebec Social and Health Survey: determinants of chronic respiratory diseases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193733
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 May-Jun;92(3):228-32
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Lévesque
P. Lajoie
M. Rhainds
T. Kosatsky
A M Grenier
P. Ernst
N. Audet
Author Affiliation
Direction régionale de santé publique de Québec, 2400, d'Estimauville, Beauport, Québec, G1E 7G9. benoît.lévesque@crchul.ulaval.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 May-Jun;92(3):228-32
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Asthma - complications
Bronchitis - complications
Child
Child, Preschool
Chronic Disease
Emphysema - complications
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypersensitivity - complications
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking - adverse effects
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
In the course of the "1998 Health and Social Survey", questions were included to verify the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases and also of wheezing. The objectives of this study were 1) to verify the prevalence of wheezing and its validity as an indicator of chronic respiratory diseases in Québec; and 2) to examine the relationship between chronic respiratory diseases and some of their potential determinants. A total of 30,386 individuals participated in the study. For all ages, the prevalence of wheezing was 5.4%. It was associated with asthma, allergies, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. A low familial income and tobacco smoking were associated with wheezing, asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Passive smoking was associated with wheezing whereas the presence of carpets was associated with wheezing and asthma. Between 32 and 48% of families with an asthmatic or an allergic member modified their dwelling to alleviate respiratory problems. The prevalence of wheezing documented here was lower than in anglosaxon countries. This result could be explained by a cultural factor (the French translation or the perception of wheezing). This study emphasizes the role of reducing tobacco smoking in the prevention of chronic respiratory diseases.
PubMed ID
11496637 View in PubMed
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Adverse health effects related to tobacco smoke exposure in a cohort of three-year olds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86172
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2008 Mar;97(3):354-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Johansson AnnaKarin
Ludvigsson Johnny
Hermansson Göran
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. anjoh@imv.liu.se
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2008 Mar;97(3):354-7
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bronchodilator Agents - therapeutic use
Child, Preschool
Cough - etiology
Crying
Fathers
Female
Fetus - drug effects
Humans
Irritable Mood
Male
Mothers
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Rhinitis - etiology
Sleep Disorders - etiology
Smoking
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects
Abstract
AIM: To analyse the importance of mothers' smoking during pregnancy and/or environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure in early childhood for children's health and well-being at the age of 3 years. METHODS: Four groups from a population based cohort (n=8850) were compared: children with nonsmoking mother during pregnancy and nonsmoking parents at the age of 3 years (n=7091); children with only foetal exposure (n=149); children exposed only postnatally (n=895) and children exposed both pre- and postnatally (n=595). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. RESULTS: Children exposed both pre- and postnatally had more wheezing (1.14; 1.07-1.21) and rhinitis (1.16; 1.06-1.26), used more cough-mixture (1.07; 1.01-1.14) and broncodilatating drugs (1.08; 1.02-1.15) and suffered more from excessive crying (1.31; 1.13-1.51) and irritability (1.27; 1.09-1.48) compared to children with nonsmoking parents. Children exposed only postnatally had more rhinitis (1.24; 1.12-1.37), used more cough-mixture (1.14; 1.05-1.29) and suffered more from poor sleep (1.26; 1.07-1.47) than children of nonsmoking parents. Children with prenatal exposure only used more broncodilatating drugs (1.45; 1.03-2.04) and suffered more from poor sleep (2.06; 1.09-3.87). CONCLUSION: Health differences, small but significant, indicate that prenatal and/or postnatal ETS exposure alone, or in combination, seems to interfere with child health, supporting the importance of zero tolerance. However, as most smoking parents in Sweden try to protect their children from ETS exposure, the results also might indicate that protective measures are worthwhile.
PubMed ID
18241297 View in PubMed
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Agreement between parental and self-completed questionnaires about asthma in teenagers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15076
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2005 Mar;16(2):176-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Linnéa Hedman
Berit Lindgren
Matthew Perzanowski
Eva Rönmark
Author Affiliation
The OLIN Studies, Sunderby Central Hospital of Norrbotten, Luleå, Sweden.
Source
Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2005 Mar;16(2):176-81
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - complications - epidemiology
Comparative Study
Cough - etiology
Data Collection - methods
Humans
Parents
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Abstract
In studies of asthma in children, a common method is for the parents to complete questionnaires about their child's asthma symptoms. With longitudinal studies of asthma, children reach an age when they can complete the questionnaire themselves. The aim of this paper was to compare the prevalence of asthma symptoms as well as the agreement between responses to an asthma questionnaire completed by teenagers and their parents. As a part of the Obstructive Lung Disease in Northern Sweden Study (OLIN) pediatric study, where 3345, 13-14-yr-old children completed an asthma questionnaire, 294 (84%) randomly selected parents also completed the questionnaire, which included the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire. There were no significant differences in the prevalence of wheeze in the last 12 months, ever asthma, or physician diagnosed asthma as reported by the parents compared with the teenagers. However, the teenagers reported a significantly higher prevalence of wheeze during or after exercise. The absolute agreement was generally very high while the level of agreement (kappa-value) was slightly lower. The highest results in both absolute agreement and kappa-value, were reached by the questions on diagnosis of asthma (98.9% and 0.93), use of asthma medicines (95.5% and 0.78), and whether the child ever had had asthma (97.2% and 0.86), respectively. In conclusion, the agreement between the parents' and the teenagers' responses to the asthma questionnaire was good. The change in methodology from parental to self-completion of the questionnaire did not affect the results in the study.
PubMed ID
15787877 View in PubMed
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Ambient air pollution triggers wheezing symptoms in infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93640
Source
Thorax. 2008 Aug;63(8):710-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Andersen Z J
Loft S.
Ketzel M.
Stage M.
Scheike T.
Hermansen M N
Bisgaard H.
Author Affiliation
Department of Biostatistics, Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen University, Øster Farimagsgade 5 Entr. B, P O Box 2099, 1014 Copenhagen K, Denmark. zorana@cancer.dk
Source
Thorax. 2008 Aug;63(8):710-6
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - genetics
Carbon Monoxide - toxicity
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Infant
Male
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Nitrogen Oxides - analysis - toxicity
Particulate Matter - analysis - toxicity
Pedigree
Prospective Studies
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Time Factors
Vehicle Emissions - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
BACKGROUND: There is limited evidence for the role of air pollution in the development and triggering of wheezing symptoms in young children. A study was undertaken to examine the effect of exposure to air pollution on wheezing symptoms in children under the age of 3 years with genetic susceptibility to asthma. METHODS: Daily recordings of symptoms were obtained for 205 children participating in the birth cohort study Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Children and living in Copenhagen for the first 3 years of life. Daily air pollution levels for particulate matter
PubMed ID
18267985 View in PubMed
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The association between endotoxin and lung function among children and adolescents living in a rural area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128591
Source
Can Respir J. 2011 Nov-Dec;18(6):e89-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joshua A Lawson
James A Dosman
Donna C Rennie
Jeremy Beach
Stephen C Newman
Ambikaipakan Senthilselvan
Author Affiliation
Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. josh.lawson@usask.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2011 Nov-Dec;18(6):e89-94
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Cotinine - analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dust - analysis
Endotoxins - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Rural Health
Saliva - chemistry
Saskatchewan
Sex Factors
Spirometry
Tobacco Smoke Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Vital Capacity
Abstract
BACKGROUND/
Knowledge of the effects of domestic endotoxin on children's lung function is limited. The association between domestic endotoxin and asthma or wheeze and lung function among school-age children (six to 18 years of age) was examined. The interaction between endotoxin and other personal and environmental characteristics and lung function was also assessed.
A case-control study was conducted in and around the rural community of Humboldt, Saskatchewan, between 2005 and 2007. Parents of cases reported either doctor-diagnosed asthma or wheeze in the previous year. Controls were randomly selected from those not reporting these conditions. Data were collected by questionnaire to ascertain symptoms and conditions, while spirometry was used to measure lung function including forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s. Dust collected from the child's play area floor and the child's mattress was used to quantify endotoxin, and saliva was collected to quantify cotinine levels and assess tobacco smoke exposure.
There were 102 cases and 207 controls included in the present study. Lower forced expiratory volume in 1 s was associated with higher mattress endotoxin load among female cases (beta=-0.25, SE=0.07 [P
Notes
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PubMed ID
22187693 View in PubMed
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Asthma and allergic rhinitis increase respiratory symptoms in cold weather among young adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258346
Source
Respir Med. 2014 Jan;108(1):63-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Henna Hyrkäs
Maritta S Jaakkola
Tina M Ikäheimo
Timo T Hugg
Jouni J K Jaakkola
Author Affiliation
Center for Environmental and Respiratory Health Research, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FI-90014 Oulu, Finland; Respiratory Medicine Unit, Department of Medicine, Oulu University Hospital, FI-90029 Oulu, Finland; Medical Research Center Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Respir Med. 2014 Jan;108(1):63-70
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Chest Pain - etiology
Cohort Studies
Cold Temperature - adverse effects
Cough - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The occurrence of cold temperature-related symptoms has not been investigated previously in young adults, although cold weather may provoke severe symptoms leading to activity limitations, and those with pre-existing respiratory conditions may form a susceptible group. We tested the hypothesis that young adults with asthma and allergic rhinitis experience cold-related respiratory symptoms more commonly than young adults in general.
A population-based study of 1623 subjects 20-27 years old was conducted with a questionnaire inquiring about cold weather-related respiratory symptoms, doctor-diagnosed asthma and rhinitis, and lifestyle and environmental exposures.
Current asthma increased the risk of all cold weather-related symptoms (shortness of breath adjusted PR 4.53, 95% confidence interval 2.93-6.99, wheezing 10.70, 5.38-21.29, phlegm production 2.51, 1.37-4.62, cough 3.41, 1.97-5.87 and chest pain 2.53, 0.82-7.79). Allergic rhinitis had additional effect especially on shortness of breath (7.16, 5.30-9.67) and wheezing (13.05, 7.75-22.00), some on phlegm production (3.69, 2.49-5.47), but marginal effect on cough and chest pain.
Our study shows that already in young adulthood those with asthma, and especially those with coexisting allergic rhinitis, experience substantially more cold temperature-related respiratory symptoms than healthy young adults. Hence, young adults with a respiratory disease form a susceptible group that needs special care and guidance for coping with cold weather.
PubMed ID
24239316 View in PubMed
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Asthma, chronic bronchitis and respiratory symptoms among adults in Estonia according to a postal questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15421
Source
Respir Med. 2001 Dec;95(12):954-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
M. Meren
L. Jannus-Pruljan
H M Loit
J. Põlluste
E. Jönsson
J. Kiviloog
B. Lundbäck
Author Affiliation
Department of Pulmonology, Institute of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Tallinn, Estonia. meren@online.ee
Source
Respir Med. 2001 Dec;95(12):954-64
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology
Bronchitis - epidemiology
Chronic Disease
Cough - epidemiology
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Abstract
Epidemiological studies indicate a lower prevalence of asthma in Eastern than Western Europe. This study of the prevalence of asthma, chronic bronchitis, and respiratory symptoms was performed in three different regions of Estonia, a state incorporated in the Soviet Union until 1991. A postal questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 24,307 of the population aged 15-64 years. The response rate was 77.6%. The prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma was 2.0% or considerably lower than in Northern and Western European countries. The prevalence of wheezing last 12 months, 21.7%, recurrent wheeze, 13.3%, and attacks of shortness of breath, 12.5%, were similar or even higher compared with prevalence rates found in the Nordic countries. The prevalence of physician-diagnosed chronic bronchitis was 10.7%, and was higher among women than in men, although the proportion of current smokers among men, 57%, was considerably greater than in women, 28%. A possible explanation to the high prevalence of respiratory symptoms also among non-smoking women may be exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in small, crowded Estonian homes. Diagnostic criteria based on the Soviet-time definitions is discussed as a possible explanation to the low prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma and high prevalence of chronic bronchitis in Estonia compared with other Northern European countries.
PubMed ID
11778792 View in PubMed
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Asthma incidence in children growing up close to traffic: a registry-based birth cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261662
Source
Environ Health. 2013;12:91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Anna Lindgren
Emilie Stroh
Jonas Björk
Kristina Jakobsson
Source
Environ Health. 2013;12:91
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - toxicity
Asthma - chemically induced - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Nitrogen Oxides - toxicity
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vehicle Emissions - toxicity
Abstract
Recent reviews conclude an association between traffic-related pollution and incidence of asthma in children, but not all studies agree. Studies have almost exclusively relied on parental-reported symptoms or parental-reported diagnoses of asthma and wheeze. Our aim was to investigate if traffic exposure is associated with higher incidence of early onset asthma, using registry-based outcome data.
We investigated a birth cohort in southern Sweden, consisting of N = 26,128 children with outcome and exposure data (born July 2005-2010). Of these children, N = 7898 had additional covariate information. The cohort was followed to the end of 2011.Traffic intensity, and dispersion-modeled concentrations of NOX (100×100 m grid), at residential addresses, were linked with registry data on dispensed asthma medication (the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register), and hospital and primary health care diagnoses of bronchiolitis, obstructive bronchitis and asthma (The Scania Health Care Register).Covariate information was obtained from questionnaires distributed to parents at Child Health Care-centre visits, eight months after birth. Cox proportional hazards regression was used for the statistical analyses.
Living in close proximity to a road with =8640 cars/day (compared to 0-8640 cars/day), was not associated with higher incidence of first purchase of inhaled ß2-agonist (adjusted hazard ratio (adj.HR) = 0.9, 95% CI: 0.8-1.0); third year purchase of inhaled ß2-agonist (adj.HR = 0.7, 95% CI: 0.6-0.9); bronchiolitis (adj.HR = 0.7, 95% CI: 0.6-0.9), obstructive bronchitis (adj.HR = 1.0, 95% CI: 0.9-1.2), or asthma (adj.HR = 0.7, 95% CI: 0.6- 0.9). Similar results were found for inhaled corticosteroids, and in relation to NOX.
Traffic-related exposure was not associated with higher incidence of asthma medication, or diagnoses of asthma, bronchiolitis, or obstructive bronchitis, in children 0-6 years in southern Sweden. This may depend on the low levels of traffic pollution in the area, mainly well below the WHO-guideline for NO2.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24160449 View in PubMed
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Asthmatic symptoms after exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates and other pesticides in the Europit field studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153966
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):721-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
D. Boers
L. van Amelsvoort
C. Colosio
E. Corsini
S. Fustinoni
L. Campo
C. Bosetti
C. La Vecchia
T. Vergieva
M. Tarkowski
J. Liesivuori
P. Steerenberg
H. van Loveren
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht University, The Netherlands.
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):721-7
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - etiology - immunology - urine
Bulgaria
Ethylenebis(dithiocarbamates) - poisoning
Ethylenethiourea - analysis
Female
Finland
Fungicides, Industrial - poisoning
Humans
Italy
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Netherlands
Occupational Diseases - etiology - immunology - urine
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Odds Ratio
Pesticides - poisoning
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds - etiology - immunology
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We conducted a multicenter prospective study to assess the effects of occupational exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamate fungicides and/or other pesticides on self-reported asthma and asthmatic symptoms. This multicenter study was conducted among 248 workers exposed to pesticides and 231 non-exposed workers from five field studies. The five field studies were carried out in The Netherlands, Italy, Finland, and two studies in Bulgaria. Subjects constituting this cohort completed a self-administered questionnaire at baseline (before the start of exposure). Ethylenethiourea in urine was determined to assess exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates. In multivariate analyses adjusted for all potential confounders (age, education, residence, smoking, gender, and field study), we found inverse associations, all not statistically significant, between occupational exposure to pesticides and asthma diagnosis (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.15-1.11), complains of chest tightness (OR 0.60; 95% CI 0.36-1.02), wheeze (OR 0.56; 95% CI 0.32-0.98), asthma attack (OR 0.52; 95% CI 0.12-2.25), and asthma medication (OR 0.79; 95% CI 0.25-2.53). Furthermore, we reported null associations for multivariate analysis using ethylenethiourea as determinant for exposure. Although exposure to pesticides remains a potential health risk, our results do not suggest an association between exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates and/or other pesticides used in our study on asthma and asthmatic symptoms.
PubMed ID
19042955 View in PubMed
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Asthma, wheezing, and allergies in Russian schoolchildren in relation to new surface materials in the home.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180871
Source
Am J Public Health. 2004 Apr;94(4):560-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Jouni J K Jaakkola
Helen Parise
Victor Kislitsin
Natalia I Lebedeva
John D Spengler
Author Affiliation
Institute of Occupational Health, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, UK. j.jaakkola@bham.ac.uk
Source
Am J Public Health. 2004 Apr;94(4):560-2
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Asthma - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child Welfare - statistics & numerical data
Construction Materials - adverse effects
Floors and Floorcoverings - statistics & numerical data
Health Care Surveys
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - etiology
Interior Design and Furnishings - statistics & numerical data
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio
Paint - adverse effects
Population Surveillance
Questionnaires
Respiratory Sounds - etiology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In a cross-sectional study of 5951 Russian 8-12-year-old schoolchildren, risks of current asthma, wheezing, and allergy were related to recent renovation and the installation of materials with potential chemical emissions. New linoleum flooring, synthetic carpeting, particleboard, wall coverings, and furniture and recent painting were determinants of 1 or several of these 3 health outcomes. These findings warrant further attention to the type of materials used in interior design.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15054004 View in PubMed
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