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37 records – page 1 of 4.

[2 centers initiate home respirator treatment in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35505
Source
Nord Med. 1995;110(5):146-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995

[Apparatus-assisted artificial respiration in the prevention and treatment of respiratory insufficiency]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61033
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1973;2:45-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973

Bilevel noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute respiratory failure: survey of Ontario practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173956
Source
Crit Care Med. 2005 Jul;33(7):1477-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Karen E A Burns
Tasnim Sinuff
Neill K J Adhikari
Maureen O Meade
Diane Heels-Ansdell
Claudio M Martin
Deborah J Cook
Author Affiliation
Division of Critical Care Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Crit Care Med. 2005 Jul;33(7):1477-83
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Cross-Sectional Studies
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Physician's Practice Patterns
Positive-Pressure Respiration - utilization
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Insufficiency - therapy
Specialization
Abstract
To determine physicians' stated practices regarding the use of bilevel noninvasive ventilation (NIV) for acute respiratory failure and the predictors of practice variation.
Cross-sectional postal survey.
Province of Ontario, Canada.
Attending physicians and residents in four specialties at 15 teaching hospitals.
We used literature searches and focus groups to design questions related to NIV utilization with respect to frequency, location of and indications for use, awareness of supporting literature, and perceived efficacy. We assessed the survey's clinical sensibility and reliability. We used regression analyses to evaluate practice variation among hospitals and specialties and to determine predictors of more frequent NIV use, initiation of and continued use in nonmonitored settings, and use for specific indications.
Three hundred eighty-five (48%) of 808 physicians responded; 242 used NIV. The two most common indications for NIV use were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and congestive heart failure. NIV guidelines, protocols, or policies were available in 12 of 15 hospitals. We found variation in NIV utilization among specialties but not hospitals. Specialty (critical care and respirology versus internal and emergency medicine), fewer years of postgraduate experience, and a greater number of noninvasive ventilators were predictors of more frequent NIV use (all p
Notes
Comment In: Crit Care Med. 2005 Jul;33(7):1642-316003076
PubMed ID
16003051 View in PubMed
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Comparison of tracheal intubation and alternative airway techniques performed in the prehospital setting by paramedics: a systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144948
Source
CJEM. 2010 Mar;12(2):135-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
Jan L Jensen
Ka Wai Cheung
John M Tallon
Andrew H Travers
Author Affiliation
Division of Emergency Medical Services, Dalhousie University, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. jljensen@dal.ca
Source
CJEM. 2010 Mar;12(2):135-40
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allied Health Personnel
Emergency Medical Services - methods - standards
Humans
Intubation, Intratracheal - standards
Ontario
Professional Competence
Respiration, Artificial - methods - standards
Respiratory Insufficiency - therapy
Abstract
This systematic review included controlled clinical trials comparing tracheal intubation (TI) with alternative airway techniques (AAT) (bag mask ventilation and use of extraglottic devices) performed by paramedics in the prehospital setting. A priori outcomes to be assessed were survival, neurologic outcome, airway management success rates and complications. We identified trials using EMBASE, MEDLINE, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, Web of Science, author contacts and hand searching. We included 5 trials enrolling a total of 1559 patients. No individual study showed any statistical difference in outcomes between the TI and AAT groups. Because of study heterogeneity, we did not pool the data. This is the most comprehensive review to date on paramedic trials. Owing to the heterogeneity of prehospital systems, administrators of each system must individually consider their airway management protocols.
PubMed ID
20219161 View in PubMed
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[CPAP-device, Karolinska hospital and Norrköping model]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60797
Source
Lakartidningen. 1977 Apr 13;74(15):1474-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-13-1977
Author
G. Kretzschmar
Source
Lakartidningen. 1977 Apr 13;74(15):1474-5
Date
Apr-13-1977
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Oxygen Inhalation Therapy - instrumentation
Respiratory Insufficiency - therapy
Sweden
PubMed ID
557713 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development and evaluation of a simulation-based resuscitation scenario assessment tool for emergency medicine residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124503
Source
CJEM. 2012 May;14(3):139-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2012
Author
Andrew Koch Hall
William Pickett
Jeffrey Damon Dagnone
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, ON.
Source
CJEM. 2012 May;14(3):139-46
Date
May-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Measurement - methods - standards
Emergency Medicine - education
Humans
Internship and Residency
Intubation, Intratracheal
Manikins
Myocardial Infarction - therapy
Observer Variation
Reference Standards
Reproducibility of Results
Respiratory Insufficiency - therapy
Resuscitation - education
Tachycardia, Ventricular - therapy
Videotape Recording
Abstract
We sought to develop and validate a three-station simulation-based Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) tool to assess emergency medicine resident competency in resuscitation scenarios.
An expert panel of emergency physicians developed three scenarios for use with high-fidelity mannequins. For each scenario, a corresponding assessment tool was developed with an essential actions (EA) checklist and a global assessment score (GAS). The scenarios were (1) unstable ventricular tachycardia, (2) respiratory failure, and (3) ST elevation myocardial infarction. Emergency medicine residents were videotaped completing the OSCE, and three clinician experts independently evaluated the videotapes using the assessment tool.
Twenty-one residents completed the OSCE (nine residents in the College of Family Physicians of Canada-Emergency Medicine [CCFP-EM] program, six junior residents in the Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada-Emergency Medicine [FRCP-EM] program, six senior residents in the FRCP-EM). Interrater reliability for the EA scores was good but varied between scenarios (Spearman rho = [1] 0.68, [2] 0.81, [3] 0.41). Interrater reliability for the GAS was also good, with less variability (rho = [1] 0.64, [2] 0.56, [3] 0.62). When comparing GAS scores, senior FRCP residents outperformed CCFP-EM residents in all scenarios and junior residents in two of three scenarios (p
PubMed ID
22575294 View in PubMed
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Emergency department length of stay for patients requiring mechanical ventilation: a prospective observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125302
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Louise Rose
Sara Gray
Karen Burns
Clare Atzema
Alex Kiss
Andrew Worster
Damon C Scales
Gordon Rubenfeld
Jacques Lee
Author Affiliation
Lawrence S, Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, 155 College St, Rm 276, Toronto, ON, M5T IP8, Canada. louise.rose@utoronto.ca
Source
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:30
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Critical Illness - therapy
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Noninvasive Ventilation - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Prospective Studies
Respiration, Artificial - statistics & numerical data
Respiratory Insufficiency - therapy
Abstract
Recommendations for acceptable emergency department (ED) length of stay (LOS) vary internationally with = 8 h generally considered acceptable. Protracted ED LOS may place critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation at increased risk of adverse events as most EDs are not resourced for longitudinal delivery of critical care. Our objective was to quantify the ED LOS for mechanically ventilated patients (invasive and/or non-invasive ventilation [NIV]) and to explore patient and system level predictors of prolonged ED LOS. Additionally, we aimed to describe delivery and monitoring of ventilation in the ED.
Prospective observational study of ED LOS for all patients receiving mechanical ventilation at four metropolitan EDs in Toronto, Canada over two six-month periods in 2009 and 2010.
We identified 618 mechanically ventilated patients which represented 0.5% (95% CI 0.4%-0.5%) of all ED visits. Of these, 484 (78.3%) received invasive ventilation, 118 (19.1%) received NIV; 16 received both during the ED stay. Median Kaplan-Meier estimated duration of ED stay for all patients was 6.4 h (IQR 2.8-14.6). Patients with trauma diagnoses had a shorter median (IQR) LOS, 2.5 h (1.3-5.1), compared to ventilated patients with non-trauma diagnoses, 8.5 h (3.3-14.0) (p
Notes
Cites: Am J Emerg Med. 2005 May;23(3):336-915915409
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2005 May;33(5):974-815891323
Cites: Med J Aust. 2006 Mar 6;184(5):208-1216515429
Cites: Med J Aust. 2006 Mar 6;184(5):213-616515430
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2006 Apr;34(4):1202-816484927
Cites: Crit Care Med. 2007 Jun;35(6):1477-8317440421
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 2007 Nov;50(5):510-617913298
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008 Jan 15;177(2):170-717962636
Cites: J Trauma. 2008 Feb;64(2):341-718301196
Cites: Emerg Med Australas. 2008 Jun;20(3):260-618062783
Cites: Int Emerg Nurs. 2008 Jul;16(3):200-618627806
Cites: Curr Opin Crit Care. 2009 Aug;15(4):279-8319606026
Cites: Am J Emerg Med. 2009 Sep;27(7):843-619683114
Cites: Acad Emerg Med. 2009 Jul;16(7):609-1619538503
Cites: CJEM. 2010 Jul;12(4):311-920650023
Cites: PLoS One. 2011;6(1):e1462321298026
Cites: J Emerg Med. 2012 Mar;42(3):353-6220692786
Cites: Intensive Care Med. 2005 Jul;31(7):922-615856172
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 May 4;342(18):1301-810793162
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Cites: Emerg Med (Fremantle). 2002 Mar;14(1):50-711993835
Cites: Chest. 2002 Oct;122(4):1382-812377869
Cites: Med J Aust. 2002 Nov 4;177(9):492-512405891
Cites: J Emerg Nurs. 2002 Dec;28(6):489-9512509725
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Cites: Crit Care Med. 2004 May;32(5):1149-5415190965
Cites: Crit Care Med. 1993 Jul;21(7):970-68319477
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 1994 Mar;23(3):546-98135431
Cites: J Trauma. 1996 Nov;41(5):808-148913208
Comment In: Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med. 2012;20:4022734972
PubMed ID
22494785 View in PubMed
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[Experience in providing intensive therapy for children with life-threatening conditions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43624
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1972 May-Jun;3:25-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
V G Prokofeva
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1972 May-Jun;3:25-6
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Heart Failure, Congestive - therapy
Humans
Infant
Respiratory Insufficiency - therapy
PubMed ID
4658560 View in PubMed
Less detail

37 records – page 1 of 4.