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The effects of CD8+gammadelta T cells on late allergic airway responses and airway inflammation in rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57418
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2003 Sep;112(3):547-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Susumu Isogai
Alexandra Rubin
Karim Maghni
David Ramos-Barbon
Rame Taha
Yasuyuki Yoshizawa
Qutayba Hamid
James G Martin
Author Affiliation
Meakins Christie Laboratories, Department of Medicine, McGill University, 3623 St Urbain, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H2X 2P2.
Source
J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2003 Sep;112(3):547-55
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoptive Transfer
Allergens - administration & dosage
Animals
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Cytokines - biosynthesis - genetics
Eosinophilia - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Interferon Type II - biosynthesis - genetics
Interleukin-4 - biosynthesis - genetics
Male
Models, Immunological
Ovalbumin - administration & dosage - immunology
RNA, Messenger - genetics - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell, gamma-delta - metabolism
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology
T-Lymphocyte Subsets - immunology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Gamma-delta (gammadelta) T cells regulate immune responses to foreign protein at mucosal surfaces. Whether they can modify allergen-induced early (EAR) and late airway responses (LAR) is unknown. OBJECTIVE: We have tested the hypothesis that the CD8+ subtype of gammadelta T cells decreases allergen-induced LAR and airway eosinophilia in the rat. METHODS: Brown Norway rats were administered, intraperitoneally, 3.5 x 10(4) lymph node CD8+gammadelta T cells from naive or sensitized rats. The recipients were sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) in Al(OH)(3) 3 days after cell transfer and challenged with aerosolized OVA 14 days later. Serum IgE was measured before allergen challenge. After challenge, lung resistance was monitored for 8 hours and then bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was analyzed for eosinophil major basic protein (MBP), IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and IFN-gamma messenger RNA-expressing cells. RESULTS: gammadelta T cells from naive donors significantly decreased LAR in OVA-challenged sensitized rats, whereas MBP(+) eosinophils were decreased by both gammadelta T cells from naive and sensitized donors. EAR and serum IgE levels were unchanged. The expression of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 by BAL cells of gammadelta T cell recipients was attenuated compared with OVA-challenged controls. This was accompanied by an increase in the expression of IFN-gamma. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with a suppressive role of CD8+gammadelta T cells on allergic airway responses. However, only gammadelta T cells from naive donors inhibit LAR.
PubMed ID
13679814 View in PubMed
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Factors related to allergic sensitization to aeroallergens in a cross-sectional study in adults: The Copenhagen Allergy Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10129
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2001 Sep;31(9):1409-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
A. Linneberg
N H Nielsen
F. Madsen
L. Frølund
A. Dirksen
T. Jørgensen
Author Affiliation
Centre for Preventive Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine M, Glostrup Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. alli@glostruphosp.dk
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2001 Sep;31(9):1409-17
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - immunology
Allergens - immunology
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Comparative Study
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dogs
Environment
Female
Humans
Immunization
Immunoglobulin E - immunology
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Skin Tests
Smoking - immunology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The factors underlying recent increases in the prevalence of respiratory allergy are largely unknown. OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between allergic sensitization and several lifestyle/environmental factors. METHODS: A cross-sectional population-based study of 15-69-year-olds in Copenhagen was carried out in 1990. The participation rate was 77.5% (1112/1435). Different lifestyle/environmental factors (explanatory variables) were defined based on questionnaire data. Dependent (outcome) variables were skin prick test (SPT) positivity or specific IgE positivity to common aeroallergens. Explanatory variables associated with outcome in univariate analysis (P
PubMed ID
11591191 View in PubMed
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[Occupational respiratory tract allergy in trout processing workers].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207494
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Sep 22;159(39):5800-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-22-1997
Author
A B Tougård
B. Bach
E. Taudorf
V L Stouby
Author Affiliation
Skive Sygehus, arbejds- og miljømedicinsk afdeling og lungemedicinsk afdeling.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Sep 22;159(39):5800-4
Date
Sep-22-1997
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Denmark
Fisheries
Humans
Occupational Diseases - etiology - immunology - microbiology
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology - microbiology
Skin Tests
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Out of 16 workers in a trout processing industry, ten experienced work-related cough, dyspnoea, and nasal secretion. A clinical examination was performed including specific IgE, precipitating antibodies IgG for trout and processing water, skin prick testing and peak flow monitoring. A total of four workers showed a positive allergic reaction. Processing water contained endotoxin and bacteria in high amounts. It is concluded, that work-related respiratory symptoms should be investigated and the cause at the workplace identified, so that preventive measures can be introduced.
PubMed ID
9340886 View in PubMed
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Skin prick tests and in vitro immunoassays with native spices and spice extracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35189
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 1995 Sep;75(3):280-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995
Author
A. Niinimäki
M. Hannuksela
S. Mäkinen-Kiljunen
Author Affiliation
University Hospital, Department of Dermatology, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 1995 Sep;75(3):280-6
Date
Sep-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Allergens - adverse effects
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Cross Reactions
Dermatitis, Atopic - etiology - immunology
Eczema - etiology - immunology
Female
Food Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology
Fruit - adverse effects
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Pollen - immunology
Radioallergosorbent Test
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology
Skin Tests
Spices - adverse effects
Vegetables - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Skin prick tests of native spices (commercial powdered spices) are common in patients with allergy to birch or mugwort pollen. Clinical symptoms from spices are infrequent but occasionally severe. OBJECTIVE: To compare the skin prick test results with native spices and spice extracts and to determine the clinical relevance of test material. METHODS: Skin prick tests with the native spices coriander, caraway, paprika, cayenne, mustard, and white pepper were made twice at 2-month to 2.9-year intervals in 49 patients. During the latter time, tests were also made with spice extracts and spice-specific serum IgE was measured. RESULTS: The reproducibility of skin test results with native spices was 67% to 100%. Spice extracts, except white pepper, elicited positive skin test reactions in half those with positive reactions to native spices. Higher specific IgE concentrations (> or = 3.5 PRU/mL) were seen in cases where the skin tests were positive to the corresponding spices with 5% extracts of > 8 kD Mw. Three-fourths of the patients with positive skin tests to native spices were positive to birch pollen and one-half to a vegetable. Mild clinical symptoms from spices were reported by one-third. CONCLUSIONS: Spice allergens partly crossreact with those of pollens and vegetables. A minority of spice allergens may give clinical symptoms. The > 8-kD 5% extracts may be relevant skin prick test materials for identifying patients at risk of developing severe symptoms from ingested spices.
PubMed ID
7552932 View in PubMed
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Suppression of allergic immune responses to house dust mite (HDM) in rats exposed to 2,3,7,8-TCDD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57482
Source
Toxicol Sci. 2001 Jul;62(1):71-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
R W Luebke
C B Copeland
M. Daniels
A L Lambert
M I Gilmour
Author Affiliation
Experimental Toxicology Division, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA. luebke.robert@epa.gov
Source
Toxicol Sci. 2001 Jul;62(1):71-9
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - administration & dosage
Animals
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid - cytology
Bronchoconstriction - immunology
Concanavalin A - pharmacology
Dust - adverse effects
Female
Immunocompromised Host - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - biosynthesis - genetics
Immunoglobulin G - biosynthesis - genetics
Intubation, Intratracheal
Lymph Nodes - cytology - drug effects - immunology
Lymphocyte Activation - drug effects
Mites - immunology
RNA, Messenger - biosynthesis
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - etiology - immunology
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Spleen - cytology - drug effects - immunology
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - toxicity
Abstract
Exposure to various xenobiotics, including oxidant gases, diesel exhaust, and certain pesticides, has been reported to exacerbate pulmonary allergic hypersensitivity responses. Increased lymphocyte proliferative responses to parasite antigens or increased antibody responses to sheep erythrocyte have also been reported in rats exposed to TCDD before infection or immunization. As a result, these studies were conducted to test the hypothesis that TCDD exposure exacerbates the allergic response to house dust mite antigen. Brown Norway rats were injected, ip, with 0, 1, 10, or 30 microg TCDD/kg 7 days before intratracheal (it) sensitization to semipurified house dust mite allergen (HDM). Fourteen days later, rats were challenged with HDM and immediate bronchospasm was measured. At this time point, plus 2 and 7 days later, inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), HDM-specific IgE levels in serum, and HDM-driven cell proliferation in bronchial lymph nodes and spleen were evaluated. TCDD exposure decreased both immediate bronchoconstriction and specific IgE synthesis after the HDM challenge; 7 days later, HDM-specific IgE responses remained suppressed. Total serum IgE levels were similar in all groups. HDM challenge alone significantly increased cellular and biochemical indicators of lung injury, both of which were suppressed by TCDD exposure. The proliferative response of lymph node cells, but not of spleen cells, to HDM was also suppressed at the highest TCDD dose, although the splenic response to Concanavalin A was elevated. It appears that early events in the response to HDM are affected by TCDD exposure, since message for IL5 was dramatically reduced 2 days after sensitization, but not after challenge. We therefore conclude that TCDD exposure suppressed, rather than enhanced the development of allergic immune responses and the expression of immune-mediated lung disease.
PubMed ID
11399795 View in PubMed
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