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Association of asthma with use of pesticides. Results of a cross-sectional survey of farmers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223018
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1992 Oct;146(4):884-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
A. Senthilselvan
H H McDuffie
J A Dosman
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Am Rev Respir Dis. 1992 Oct;146(4):884-7
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Asthma - chemically induced - epidemiology
Carbamates
Cross-Sectional Studies
Herbicides - adverse effects
Humans
Insecticides - adverse effects
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Respiratory Function Tests
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
We investigated the association of self-reported asthma and pesticide use in 1,939 male farmers. Regardless of age, smoking pack-years, and nasal allergic reactions, the prevalence of asthma was significantly associated with the use of carbamate insecticides (prevalence odds ratio = 1.8, 95% confidence interval: 1.1 to 3.1, p = 0.02). Self-reported asthmatics, in comparison with nonasthmatics, had significantly lower mean values for lung function test variables after adjusting for age and height and a higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms. These findings raise the possibility that exposure to agriculture chemicals could be related to lung dysfunction in exposed farmers.
PubMed ID
1416414 View in PubMed
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Longitudinal estimates of pulmonary function decline in grain workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217359
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1994 Sep;150(3):656-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
P. Pahwa
A. Senthilselvan
H H McDuffie
J A Dosman
Author Affiliation
Centre for Agricultural Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1994 Sep;150(3):656-62
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Canada - epidemiology
Cereals - adverse effects
Dust - adverse effects
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Function Tests - statistics & numerical data
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Smoking - epidemiology - physiopathology
Time Factors
Abstract
We conducted a cohort analysis of longitudinal changes in pulmonary function test values in male grain elevator workers in five regions of Canada over a 6-yr period involving three observations. Pulmonary function tests were obtained approximately each 3 yr during an observation interval called a "cycle". The periods of the cycles were 1978-81 (Cycle I), 1981-84 (Cycle II), and 1984-87 (Cycle III), respectively. Data on respiratory symptoms and pulmonary function tests were collected on the same 881 workers in Cycles I and II (mean ages +/- SE: 37.0 +/- 0.48 yr at Cycle I), on the same 1,294 workers in Cycles I, II, and III (34.6 +/- 0.34 yr at Cycle I), and on the same 1,021 workers in Cycles II and III (33.9 +/- 0.38 yr at Cycle II) for a total of 3,196 workers with two or more observations over the 6-yr period. The proportion of current smokers decreased from Cycle I to Cycle III. Autoregression analysis of longitudinal changes in lung function data showed that predictors of FEV1 were height, years in the industry, smoking status, and geographic region. The mean annual losses in FEV1 (FVC) were 28.7 ml (26.4 ml), 38.4 ml (41.9 ml), and 41.7 ml (32.3 ml) for nonsmokers, ex-smokers, and current smokers, respectively. The annual loss of FEV1 (FVC) was 9.2 ml (21.1 ml) for those who were in the grain industry for less than 5 yr and 52.6 ml (60.8 ml) for those who were exposed for 20 yr or more.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8087334 View in PubMed
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Respiratory health effects of alkali dust in residents near desiccated Old Wives Lake.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223179
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1992 Sep-Oct;47(5):364-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
S R Gomez
R A Parker
J A Dosman
H H McDuffie
Author Affiliation
Centre for Agricultural Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1992 Sep-Oct;47(5):364-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - chemically induced
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Alkalies - adverse effects
Child
Desiccation
Disasters
Dust - adverse effects
Environmental Exposure
Female
Geography
Humans
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Tract Diseases - chemically induced - physiopathology
Salts - adverse effects
Saskatchewan
Wind
Abstract
Several years of drought have contributed to the desiccation of Old Wives Lake, a shallow, alkaline lake in southern Saskatchewan. The prevailing northwest wind, which blows across the 177-km2 dry lake bed, has generated airborne sodium sulfate, silt, and clay. Residents have reported nasal, eye, and respiratory irritation. A cross-sectional design that included 300 controls and 300 exposed subjects elucidated the potential adverse respiratory health effects of exposure to blowing alkali salt and dust. An increased prevalence of current cough, current wheeze, chronic cough, chronic wheeze, chronic eye irritation, and chronic nasal irritation was identified in the exposed population. Smoking-adjusted odds ratios were consistent with the prevalence ratios. Lung function did not differ between the exposed and the control populations. Rainfall during the study period reduced airborne dust levels and may have precluded demonstration of previously reported adverse effects.
PubMed ID
1444599 View in PubMed
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Respiratory health of swine producers. Focus on young workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221566
Source
Chest. 1993 Mar;103(3):702-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
J E Zejda
T S Hurst
C S Rhodes
E M Barber
H H McDuffie
J A Dosman
Author Affiliation
Centre for Agricultural Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Chest. 1993 Mar;103(3):702-9
Date
Mar-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Animal Husbandry - statistics & numerical data
Animals
Cereals
Chi-Square Distribution
Female
Health status
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Regression Analysis
Respiration
Respiratory Function Tests - statistics & numerical data
Respiratory Tract Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Swine
Abstract
In this report, we compare the respiratory health of swine producers, grain farmers, and nonfarming control subjects, separately in all age groups and in young subjects. We examined 249 swine producers (age 37.7 years), 251 grain farmers (age 44.7 years), and 263 nonfarming subjects (age 40.7 years). Swine producers had significantly more symptoms of chronic bronchitis (15.3 percent) than did grain farmers (7.2 percent) or nonfarming men (5.7 percent). After controlling for age, height, and smoking, the functional indices of airflow (FEV1, FEV1/FVC, FEF25-75, Vmax50, and Vmax25) were slightly but significantly lower in swine producers than in grain farmers. In comparison with nonfarming subjects, swine producers also had significantly lower FEV1/FVC, FEF25-75, and Vmax50. Respiratory symptoms were associated with the number of hours of work per day. This indirect index of exposure was also inversely associated with FVC (p
PubMed ID
8449055 View in PubMed
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Seasonal changes in lung function in a farming population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197310
Source
Can Respir J. 2000 Jul-Aug;7(4):320-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Senthilselvan
J A Dosman
K M Semchuk
H H McDuffie
A J Cessna
D G Irvine
M F Crossley
A. Rosenberg
Author Affiliation
Centre for Agricultural Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. sentil@ualberta.ca
Source
Can Respir J. 2000 Jul-Aug;7(4):320-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agricultural Workers' Diseases - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure
Female
Herbicides
Humans
Insecticides
Longitudinal Studies
Lung - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure
Regression Analysis
Respiratory Function Tests
Rural Population
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Seasons
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
To assess the changes in respiratory health from winter to summer seasons in a rural population.
A longitudinal design was used in the study.
A population-based study was conducted as part of the Environmental Pesticide Exposure and Human Health component of the Prairie Ecosystem Study (PECOS) in southwestern Saskatchewan.
In the winter season, 358 patients participated in the study. Of these patients, 234 returned for the second assessment during the summer season. After excluding 34 children aged 17 years and under, 200 adult patients were available for analysis.
Questionnaires were used to obtain information on demographic factors, smoking habits, occupational and environmental exposures, and respiratory conditions. Pulmonary function measurements were obtained using a volume displacement spirometer.
Mean ages (+/- SD) of the 106 men and 94 women participating in the study were 50.1+/-13.3 and 49.0+/-13.1 years, respectively. Mean percentage changes in maximal midexpiratory flow rate from winter to summer assessments indicated an improvement for town residents and a decline for farm residents. Mean percentage changes in the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s to forced vital capacity indicated an improvement for town residents who were not engaged in farming, and increasing declines for town residents engaged in farming, farm residents not engaged in farming and farm residents engaged in farming.
Seasonal changes occurred in measurements of pulmonary function between winter and summer seasons; these changes may be related to the environmental or occupational exposures experienced by the participants during the study.
PubMed ID
10980458 View in PubMed
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