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Accelerated lung function decline in swine confinement workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208355
Source
Chest. 1997 Jun;111(6):1733-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
A. Senthilselvan
J A Dosman
S P Kirychuk
E M Barber
C S Rhodes
Y. Zhang
T S Hurst
Author Affiliation
Centre for Agricultural Medicine, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Chest. 1997 Jun;111(6):1733-41
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - physiology
Agriculture
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Cereals
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Lung - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Function Tests - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population
Saskatchewan
Smoking - physiopathology
Swine
Abstract
We conducted a longitudinal study to determine the annual rate decline in pulmonary function measurements in male swine confinement workers. For comparison, a grain farming group and a nonfarming rural-dwelling control group were also chosen for the longitudinal study. Two hundred seventeen swine confinement workers, 218 grain farmers, and 179 nonfarming control subjects had valid pulmonary function measurements at the baseline observation conducted in 1990 to 1991 and at the second observation conducted in 1994 to 1995. The swine confinement workers were younger (mean age=38.3+/-11.7 [SD] years) than the nonfarming control subjects (42.6+/-10.4 years) and the grain farmers (44.5+/-11.9 years). When stratified by age, nonfarming control subjects had the lowest mean annual rate decline in FEV1 and FVC in all age categories. The swine confinement workers had the largest annual rate decline in FEV1 and FVC, and this was most obvious in the middle age categories. After controlling for age, height, smoking, and baseline pulmonary function, swine confinement workers had excess annual decline of 26.1 mL in FEV1 (p=0.0005), 33.5 mL in FVC (p=0.0002), and 42.0 mL/s in forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of FVC (FEF[25-75%]) (p=0.02) over nonfarming control subjects. Grain farmers had excess annual decline of 16.4 mL in FEV1 (p=0.03), 26.7 mL in FVC (p=0.002), and 11.2 mL/s in FEF(25-75%) (p=0.38) over control subjects. These findings suggest that workers engaged in the swine industry and grain farmers appear prone to accelerated yearly losses in lung function and may therefore be at risk for the future development of chronic airflow limitation.
PubMed ID
9187201 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and reliability of 'specialized' physical therapists in auscultating tape-recorded lung sounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219667
Source
Physiother Can. 1993;45(1):21-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
D. Brooks
L. Wilson
C. Kelsey
Author Affiliation
Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Toronto.
Source
Physiother Can. 1993;45(1):21-4
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Auscultation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Clinical Competence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Diagnostic Errors
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Ontario
Physical Therapy Modalities - classification - standards - statistics & numerical data
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Respiratory Function Tests - standards - statistics & numerical data
Tape Recording
Abstract
This study investigated the accuracy and inter-rater reliability of 'specialized' physical therapists in the auscultation of tape-recorded lung sounds. In addition, a correlation was investigated between accuracy of interpretation and the number of years of specialization in the field of cardiorespiratory physical therapy. This research follows an earlier study which investigated the accuracy and inter-rater reliability of auscultating tape-recorded lung sounds in a 'non-specialized' cohort of physical therapists. The subjects were 26 'specialized' cardiorespiratory physical therapists working in acute urban teaching hospitals. These individuals were required to have been practising currently and exclusively for at least one year in the area of cardiorespiratory physical therapy. Participants listened with a stethoscope to five different sounds and identified them from a standardized list of terms. One of three tapes with the same lung sounds in different order was randomly selected for each physical therapist. The percentage of correct answers for all subjects was calculated. An accurate response in the detection of lung sounds was arbitrarily defined as a percentage of correct answers of 70% or greater. The difference between the pooled correct response rate of 50% and the arbitrarily set value of 70% was statistically significant (z = 2.23, p
PubMed ID
10124337 View in PubMed
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[A comparative survey of radiologic abnormalities of workers in chrysotile asbestos, talc and non-mineral products industries].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature251482
Source
Bull Int Union Tuberc. 1976;51(1 Pt 2):621-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976

Acute and subacute symptoms among workers in the printing industry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51443
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1982 Feb;39(1):70-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1982
Author
J. Baelum
I. Andersen
L. Mølhave
Source
Br J Ind Med. 1982 Feb;39(1):70-5
Date
Feb-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Eye Diseases - chemically induced
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nervous System Diseases - chemically induced
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases - chemically induced
Printing
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Function Tests
Abstract
The study population comprised 52 male printers and 52 controls. Each person was interviewed about job history, general health, and work-related symptoms. Symptoms from eyes and airways, neurological symptoms, and general symptoms were recorded. A lung function test and a measurement of the sense of smell were also carried out. The printers had significantly more eye, airway, and neurological symptoms than the controls; the main complaints being irritation of eyes, nose, throat, and a reduced sense of taste. The neurological symptoms were disorders of vision, vertigo, feeling of intoxication, and headache. Furthermore, abdominal pain and flatulence occurred more often among the printers. The symptoms showed no relation to age or job seniority, but neurological and general symptoms were related to shift work. No difference in lung function was found between the two groups. The printers had a slightly lower threshold of smell than the controls. Although the total load due to organic solvents and dust in the air was far below legal limits, the number of magnitude of symptoms experienced by the printers exceeded what is supposed when norms for workroom exposure are set. It is suggested that either the irritative effects of solvents are underestimated or the assumption of additive effects when great numbers of solvents are found does not hold true. A reduction of the number of solvents by eliminating the most toxic solvents or by using dyes without solvents is suggested.
PubMed ID
7066223 View in PubMed
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The acute effects of inhaled salbutamol on the beat-to-beat variability of heart rate and blood pressure assessed by spectral analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208850
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1997 Apr;43(4):421-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
T. Jartti
T. Kaila
K. Tahvanainen
T. Kuusela
T. Vanto
I. Välimäki
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Turku University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Br J Clin Pharmacol. 1997 Apr;43(4):421-8
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Inhalation
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Albuterol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Baroreflex - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Bronchodilator Agents - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Bronchospirometry
Child
Cross-Over Studies
Double-Blind Method
Electrocardiography - drug effects
Female
Finland
Forced Expiratory Flow Rates - drug effects
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Male
Respiratory Function Tests
Supine Position
Abstract
We wanted to study the effects of a 600 micrograms inhaled salbutamol dose on the cardiovascular and respiratory autonomic nervous regulation in eight children suffering from bronchial asthma.
In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study we continuously measured electrocardiogram, finger systolic arterial pressure (SAP) and flow-volume spirometry at baseline as well as 20 min and 2 h after the drug inhalation. The R-R interval (the time between successive heart beats) and SAP variabilities were assessed by using spectral analysis. Baroreflex sensitivity was assessed by using cross-spectral analysis.
Salbutamol significantly decreased the total and low frequency (LF) variability of R-R intervals as well as the high frequency (HF) variability of R-R intervals and of SAP. Salbutamol significantly increased the LF/HF ratio of R-R intervals and of SAP, minute ventilation, heart rate and forced pulmonary function in comparison with placebo. The weight of the subjects significantly correlated positively with baroreflex sensitivity and negatively with heart rate after the salbutamol inhalation.
We conclude that the acute salbutamol inhalation decreases cardiovagal nervous responsiveness, increases sympathetic dominance in the cardiovascular autonomic balance, and has a tendency to decrease baroreflex sensitivity in addition to improved pulmonary function.
PubMed ID
9146855 View in PubMed
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Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: influence of social factors in determining length of hospital stay and readmission rates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154563
Source
Can Respir J. 2008 Oct;15(7):361-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Alyson W M Wong
Wen Q Gan
Jane Burns
Don D Sin
Sephan F van Eeden
Author Affiliation
The James iCAPTURE Centre for Cardiovascular and pulmonary Research, Heart and Lung Institute, St Paul's Hospital, Providence Healthcare, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Can Respir J. 2008 Oct;15(7):361-4
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Marital Status - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Readmission - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology
Recurrence
Respiratory Function Tests
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) is the leading reason for hospitalization in Canada and a significant financial burden on hospital resources. Identifying factors that influence the time a patient spends in the hospital and readmission rates will allow for better use of scarce hospital resources.
To determine the factors that influence length of stay (LOS) in the hospital and readmission for patients with AECOPD in an inner-city hospital.
Using the Providence Health Records, a retrospective review of patients admitted to St Paul's Hospital (Vancouver, British Columbia) during the winter of 2006 to 2007 (six months) with a diagnosis of AECOPD, was conducted. Exacerbations were classified according to Anthonisen criteria to determine the severity of exacerbation on admission. Severity of COPD was scored using the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria. For comparative analysis, severity of disease (GOLD criteria), age, sex and smoking history were matched.
Of 109 admissions reviewed, 66 were single admissions (61%) and 43 were readmissions (39%). The number of readmissions ranged from two to nine (mean of 3.3 readmissions). More than 85% of admissions had the severity of COPD equal to or greater than GOLD stage 3. The significant indicators for readmission were GOLD status (P
Notes
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Comment In: Can Respir J. 2008 Oct;15(7):343-419069593
PubMed ID
18949105 View in PubMed
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Acute respiratory distress syndrome: nationwide changes in incidence, treatment and mortality over 23 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118376
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2013 Jan;57(1):37-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
M I Sigurdsson
K. Sigvaldason
T S Gunnarsson
A. Moller
G H Sigurdsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. gislihs@landspitali.is
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2013 Jan;57(1):37-45
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
APACHE
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Infant
Intensive Care
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Positive-Pressure Respiration
Prognosis
Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult - epidemiology - mortality - therapy
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Insufficiency - epidemiology - etiology
Sex Factors
Survival
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess population-based changes in incidence, treatment, and in short- and long-term survival of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) over 23 years.
Analysis of all patients in Iceland who fulfilled the consensus criteria for ARDS in 1988-2010. Demographic variables, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) scores and ventilation parameters were collected from hospital charts.
The age-standardised incidence of ARDS during the study period was 7.2 cases per 100,000 person-years and was increased by 0.2 cases per year (P?
Notes
Comment In: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2013 Jan;57(1):1-223216359
PubMed ID
23216361 View in PubMed
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Acute respiratory effects and biomarkers of inflammation due to welding-derived nanoparticle aggregates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287249
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2017 Jul;90(5):451-463
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2017
Author
Katrin Dierschke
Christina Isaxon
Ulla B K Andersson
Eva Assarsson
Anna Axmon
Leo Stockfelt
Anders Gudmundsson
Bo A G Jönsson
Monica Kåredal
Jakob Löndahl
Joakim Pagels
Aneta Wierzbicka
Mats Bohgard
Jörn Nielsen
Source
Int Arch Occup Environ Health. 2017 Jul;90(5):451-463
Date
Jul-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biomarkers
Double-Blind Method
Dust
Humans
Interleukin-6 - analysis
Leukotriene B4 - adverse effects
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Nanoparticles - adverse effects
Nasal Lavage
Neutrophils
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Respiratory Function Tests
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Welding
Abstract
Welders are exposed to airborne particles from the welding environment and often develop symptoms work-related from the airways. A large fraction of the particles from welding are in the nano-size range. In this study we investigate if the welders' airways are affected by exposure to particles derived from gas metal arc welding in mild steel in levels corresponding to a normal welding day.
In an exposure chamber, 11 welders with and 10 welders without work-related symptoms from the lower airways and 11 non-welders without symptoms, were exposed to welding fumes (1 mg/m3) and to filtered air, respectively, in a double-blind manner. Symptoms from eyes and upper and lower airways and lung function were registered. Blood and nasal lavage (NL) were sampled before, immediately after and the morning after exposure for analysis of markers of oxidative stress. Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) for analysis of leukotriene B4 (LT-B4) was sampled before, during and immediately after exposure.
No adverse effects of welding exposure were found regarding symptoms and lung function. However, EBC LT-B4 decreased significantly in all participants after welding exposure compared to filtered air. NL IL-6 increased immediately after exposure in the two non-symptomatic groups and blood neutrophils tended to increase in the symptomatic welder group. The morning after, neutrophils and serum IL-8 had decreased in all three groups after welding exposure. Remarkably, the symptomatic welder group had a tenfold higher level of EBC LT-B4 compared to the two groups without symptoms.
Despite no clinical adverse effects at welding, changes in inflammatory markers may indicate subclinical effects even at exposure below the present Swedish threshold limit (8 h TWA respirable dust).
Notes
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PubMed ID
28258373 View in PubMed
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Acute symptoms following exposure to grain dust in farming.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237190
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1986 Apr;66:73-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1986
Author
J. Manfreda
V. Holford-Strevens
M. Cheang
C P Warren
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 1986 Apr;66:73-80
Date
Apr-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cereals - adverse effects
Dust - adverse effects
Epidemiologic Methods
Farmer's Lung - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Male
Manitoba
Middle Aged
Respiratory Function Tests
Skin Tests
Smoking
Abstract
History of acute symptoms (cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, fever, stuffy nose, and skin itching/rash) following exposure to grain dust was obtained from 661 male and 535 female current and former farmers. These symptoms were relatively common: 60% of male and 25% of female farmers reported at least one such symptom on exposure to grain dust. Association of cough, wheezing, shortness of breath, and stuffy nose with skin reactivity and capacity to form IgE is consistent with an allergic nature of these symptoms. Barley and oats dust were perceived as dust most often producing symptoms. On the other hand, grain fever showed a different pattern, i.e., it was not associated with either skin reactivity or total IgE. Smoking might modify the susceptibility to react to grain dust with symptoms. Only those who reported wheezing on exposure to grain dust may have an increased risk to develop chronic airflow obstruction.
Notes
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PubMed ID
3709486 View in PubMed
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Adapting the Asthma Life Impact Scale (ALIS) for use in Southern European (Italian) and Eastern European (Russian) cultures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131506
Source
J Med Econ. 2011;14(6):729-38
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
J. Twiss
S P McKenna
S R Crawford
M. Tammaru
N C Oprandi
Author Affiliation
Galen Research Ltd, Manchester, UK. jtwiss@galen-research.com
Source
J Med Econ. 2011;14(6):729-38
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asthma - ethnology - physiopathology - psychology
Cultural Competency
Female
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Respiratory Function Tests
Russia - epidemiology
Translating
Young Adult
Abstract
The Asthma Life Impact Scale (ALIS) is a disease-specific measure used to assess the quality-of-life of people with asthma. It was developed in the UK and US and has proven to be acceptable to patients, to have good psychometric properties, and to be unidimensional.
This paper reports on the adaptation and validation of the ALIS for use in representative Southern European (Italian) and Eastern European (Russian) languages.
The ALIS was translated for both cultures using the dual-panel process. The newly translated versions were then tested with asthma patients to ensure face and content validity. Psychometric properties of the new language versions were assessed via a test?re-test postal survey conducted in both countries.
It is possible that some cultural or language differences still exist between the different language versions. Further research should be undertaken to determine responsiveness. Further studies designed to determine the clinical validity of the Italian ALIS would be valuable.
Linguistic nuances were easily resolved during the translation process for both language adaptations. Cognitive debriefing interviews (Russia n=9, male=11.1%, age mean (SD)=55.4 (13.2); Italy n=15, male=66.7%, age mean (SD)=63.5 (11.2)) indicated that the ALIS was easy to read and acceptable to patients. Psychometric testing was conducted on the data (Russia n=61, age mean (SD)=40.7 (15.4); Italy n=71, male=42.6%, age mean (SD)=49.5 (14.1)). The results showed that the new versions of the ALIS were consistent (Russian and Italian Cronbach's alpha=0.92) and reproducible (Russian test-re-test=0.86; Italian test-re-test=0.94). The Italian adaptation showed the expected correlations with the NHP and the Russian adaptation showed strong correlations with the CASIS and CAFS and weak-to-moderate correlations with %FEV1 and %PEF. In both adaptations the ALIS was able to distinguish between participants based on self-reported general health, self-reported severity, and whether or not they were hospitalized in the previous week.
PubMed ID
21899487 View in PubMed
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630 records – page 1 of 63.