Skip header and navigation

Refine By

72 records – page 1 of 8.

A 1-year follow-up of low birth weight infants with and without bronchopulmonary dysplasia: health, growth, clinical lung disease, cardiovascular and neurological sequelae.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59584
Source
Early Hum Dev. 1992 Sep;30(2):109-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992

Acute airway management in the critically ill child requiring transport.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226728
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1991 Mar;38(2):252-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1991
Author
J. Fuller
T. Frewen
R. Lee
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, St. Joseph's Health Centre, London, Ontario.
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1991 Mar;38(2):252-4
Date
Mar-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Critical Care - organization & administration
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Infant
Ontario
Patient care team
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Retrospective Studies
Transportation of Patients
Abstract
Airway compromise was found to be a common problem in children requiring critical care transport to our hospital. This retrospective review of 39 infants and children was undertaken to assess the frequency and degree of airway compromise in these children, to document the management required and to determine who performed it. Ninety-seven per cent of children had airway difficulties associated with their disease, and one-third of these required further airway management on the arrival of the transport team. Airway specialists had not been involved in the care of these children before the arrival of the transport team. This indicates that greater attention should be paid to airway management as soon as children are identified as being sufficiently ill to require transport to a tertiary care facility.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Anaesth. 1991 Mar;38(2):151-42021985
PubMed ID
2021999 View in PubMed
Less detail

Airway symptoms and lung function in the local population after the oil tank explosion in Gulen, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118172
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2012;12:76
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Jens-Tore Granslo
Magne Bråtveit
Bjørg Eli Hollund
Ågot Irgens
Cecilie Svanes
Nils Magerøy
Bente Elisabeth Moen
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. jens-tore.granslo@helse-bergen.no
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2012;12:76
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Environmental Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Explosions
Female
Humans
Lung - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Questionnaires
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Spirometry
Abstract
Oil tanks containing a mixture of hydrocarbons, including sulphuric compounds, exploded and caught fire in an industrial harbour. This study assesses airway symptoms and lung function in the nearby population 1½ years after the explosion.
A cross-sectional study included individuals =18 years old. Individuals living 20 km away formed a control group. A questionnaire and spirometry tests were completed by 223 exposed individuals (response rate men 70%, women 75%) and 179 control individuals (response rate men 51%, women 65%). Regression analyses included adjustment for smoking, occupational exposure, atopy, infection in the preceding month and age. Analyses of symptoms were also adjusted for stress reactions related to the accident.
Exposed individuals experienced significantly more blocked nose (odds ratio 1.7 [95% confidence interval 1.0, 2.8]), rhinorrhoea (1.6 [1.1, 3.3]), nose irritation (3.4 [2.0, 5.9]), sore throat (3.1 [1.8, 5.5]), morning cough (3.5 [2.0, 5.5]), daily cough (2.2 [1.4, 3.7]), cough >3 months a year (2.9 [1.5, 5.3]) and cough with phlegm (1.9 [1.2, 3.1]) than control individuals. A significantly increasing trend was found for nose symptoms and cough, depending on the proximity of home address to explosion site (daily cough, 3-6km 1.8 [1.0, 3.1],
Notes
Cites: Clin Physiol. 2001 Nov;21(6):648-6011722472
Cites: Nord J Psychiatry. 2009;63(5):426-3219688636
Cites: Behav Res Ther. 2003 Dec;41(12):1489-9614705607
Cites: BMJ. 1993 Nov 13;307(6914):1251-58281057
Cites: BMJ. 1994 Sep 24;309(6957):773-47950562
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1995 Sep;152(3):1107-367663792
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 1997 Jul;100(1):16-229257782
Cites: Eur J Epidemiol. 1999 Mar;15(3):293-910395061
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1999 May;53(5):306-1010396538
Cites: Arch Environ Health. 1999 Jul-Aug;54(4):254-6310433184
Cites: J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004 Nov;114(5):1116-2315536419
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2005 Apr;113(4):406-1115811830
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 2005;27:107-1415958431
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2005 Aug;26(2):319-3816055882
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2005 Sep 15;162(6):499-50716107572
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2005 Nov;26(5):948-6816264058
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Sep 15;176(6):532-5517507545
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Sep 15;176(6):610-617556713
Cites: Addict Behav. 2008 Aug;33(8):1039-4718501524
Cites: Thorax. 2009 Aug;64(8):657-6319359266
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2009 Oct;35(5):368-7519436923
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2009 Dec;35(6):454-6119806271
Cites: Psychol Methods. 2009 Dec;14(4):349-6619968397
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2010 Oct 19;153(8):489-9820733177
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2002 Jul;44(7):601-512134522
PubMed ID
23234609 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anaesthetic management of acute blunt thoracic trauma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226376
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1991 May;38(4 Pt 1):506-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1991
Author
J H Devitt
R F McLean
J P Koch
Author Affiliation
Department of Anaesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1991 May;38(4 Pt 1):506-10
Date
May-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abbreviated Injury Scale
Adult
Age Factors
Anesthesia, General - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Intraoperative Care - statistics & numerical data
Intubation, Intratracheal - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology
Respiration, Artificial - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Thoracic Injuries - epidemiology - mortality
Wounds, Nonpenetrating - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Sunnybrook Health Science Centre is an adult regional trauma unit serving metropolitan Toronto and environs. We undertook a two-year retrospective review of patients admitted to our institution with blunt thoracic trauma. Three hundred and thirty-three patients with blunt trauma and an injury severity score (ISS) greater than 17 required emergency surgery. Of these, 208 had blunt thoracic injuries while 125 did not have chest injuries. Both groups were similar with respect to age but patients with thoracic trauma had a greater ISS. (P less than 0.05) and greater intraoperative mortality (P less than 0.01). The aetiology of the intraoperative deaths with one exception was exsanguination. Emergency thoracotomy or sternotomy indicated a poor prognosis with a mortality rate of 80%. The most common intraoperative problem was an elevated airway pressure. Awake intubation was undertaken in 77.5% of patients requiring anaesthesia and surgery because of the potentially compromised airways and difficult intubations due to the nature of the associated injuries. Finally, 74% of patients undergoing urgent surgery required mechanical postoperative ventilation. The presence of blunt chest trauma should be considered a marker of the severity of injury sustained by the patient.
PubMed ID
2065419 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anxiety and depression in relation to respiratory symptoms and asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15964
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1994 Apr;149(4 Pt 1):930-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
C. Janson
E. Björnsson
J. Hetta
G. Boman
Author Affiliation
Department of Lung Medicine, Uppsala University, Akademiska sjukhuset, Sweden.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1994 Apr;149(4 Pt 1):930-4
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Asthma - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Comparative Study
Depression - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Psychophysiology
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology
Respiratory Function Tests
Skin Tests
Sweden - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim of this investigation was to study the relationship between psychologic status and respiratory health. The study comprised 715 persons aged 22 to 44 who participated in the European Commission Respiratory Health Survey. The study included a structural interview, spirometry, methacholine challenge, peak flow diary, skin prick test, and measurement of eosinophil activity in peripheral blood. The psychologic status was assessed by means of the hospital anxiety and depression (HAD) scale questionnaire. A significant correlation was found between anxiety and depression and the report of asthma-related symptoms, such as attacks of breathlessness after activity and waking with attacks of breathlessness (p
PubMed ID
8143058 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between particulate air pollution and first hospital admission for childhood respiratory illness in Vancouver, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173567
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2004 Jan;59(1):14-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Qiuying Yang
Yue Chen
Daniel Krewski
Yuanli Shi
Richard T Burnett
Kimberlyn M McGrail
Author Affiliation
McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Arch Environ Health. 2004 Jan;59(1):14-21
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
British Columbia - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cross-Over Studies
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Male
Particle Size
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Risk factors
Seasons
Abstract
In this study, the authors assessed the impact of particulate air pollution on first respiratory hospitalization. Study subjects were children less than 3 years of age living in Vancouver, British Columbia, who had their first hospitalization as a result of any respiratory disease (ICD-9 codes 460-519) during the period from June 1, 1995, to March 31, 1999. The authors used logistic regression to estimate the associations between ambient concentrations of particulate matter (PM) and first hospitalization. The adjusted odds ratios for first respiratory hospitalization associated with mean and maximal PM10-2.5 with a lag of 3 days were 1.12 (95% confidence interval: 0.98, 1.28) and 1.13 (1.00, 1.27). After adjustment for gaseous pollutants, the corresponding odds ratios were 1.22 (1.02, 1.48) and 1.14 (0.99, 1.32). The data indicated the possibility of harmful effects from coarse PM on first hospitalization for respiratory disease in early childhood.
PubMed ID
16053204 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations between outdoor air pollutants and hospitalization for respiratory diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197016
Source
Epidemiology. 2000 Mar;11(2):136-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
J A Hagen
P. Nafstad
A. Skrondal
S. Bjørkly
P. Magnus
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Health Sciences, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Epidemiology. 2000 Mar;11(2):136-40
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Benzene - analysis
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Models, Statistical
Norway - epidemiology
Particle Size
Poisson Distribution
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Risk
Seasons
Urban Population
Abstract
The concentration of particulate matter in outdoor air, as indicated by daily measures of particulate matter 10 microm in diameter (PM10) in many cities, has been found to be associated with the daily number of deaths and hospital admissions in these cities. To understand this association better, we studied the daily number of hospital admissions for respiratory diseases and the concentrations of eight pollutants in ambient air, during a period of 38 months, in an area with cold winters and air pollution that comes mainly from motor vehicles. We estimated the changes in risk of hospitalization by interquartile increases in pollutant concentrations by Poisson regression analyses. Controlling for periodic trends and weather, the relative risk of hospitalization associated with an interquartile increase of PM10 was 1.038 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.991-1.087]. In contrast, the relative risk associated with benzene was 1.105 (95% CI = 1.047-1.166). In a two-pollutant model, the relative risk estimates were 1.014 (95% CI = 0.966-1.063) for PM10 and 1.090 (95% CI = 1.031-1.153) for benzene. We evaluated other two- and three-pollutant models and concluded that pollutants other than PM10 are more strongly associated with hospital admissions for respiratory diseases.
PubMed ID
11021609 View in PubMed
Less detail

Baseline characteristics are not sufficient indicators of non-response bias follow up studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67810
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1992 Dec;46(6):617-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
J. Vestbo
F V Rasmussen
Author Affiliation
Medical Department P, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen NV, Denmark.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1992 Dec;46(6):617-9
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Bias (epidemiology)
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Patient compliance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology
Respiratory Function Tests
Silicate Cement
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to examine whether baseline characteristics from a cross sectional survey provided sufficient information regarding non-response bias in a follow up study when compared with information on hospital admissions in the intervening years. DESIGN--This was an 11 year follow up study of a cohort selected in 1974 with register information on hospital admissions during follow up. SETTING--The study was based on a sample of cement workers from a particular Portland cement factory with suitable controls from other occupations. PARTICIPANTS--A total of 1404 men participated in the first survey in 1974, including a questionnaire and lung function tests. In 1985 1070 men were alive and of these, 928 men (87%) responded to a postal questionnaire. MAIN RESULTS--Non-responders in 1985 did not differ markedly from responders when smoking habits, respiratory symptoms, and lung function were examined in 1974. During follow up, non-responders had twice as high rates of hospital admission due to respiratory diseases as responders. These differences remained present after adjusting for minor differences in age and smoking habits. CONCLUSIONS--Equal distributions of baseline characteristics among responders and non-responders in a follow up study do not preclude non-response bias.
PubMed ID
1494079 View in PubMed
Less detail

Chronic Respiratory Diseases in the Regions of Northern Russia: Epidemiological Distinctions in the Results of a National Population Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290370
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 07 26; 14(8):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
07-26-2017
Author
Marine H Gambaryan
Svetlana A Shalnova
Alexander D Deev
Oxana M Drapkina
Author Affiliation
Federal State Institution National Research Center for Preventive Medicine, Moscow 101990, Russia. mgambar@mgnicpm.com.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 07 26; 14(8):
Date
07-26-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Disease - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Respiration Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the study is to investigate the epidemiological situation regarding chronic respiratory diseases in populations that inhabit different climatic-geographical regions of Russia, and to develop targeted programs for prevention of these diseases.
(1) a comparative analysis of the standardized mortality data in Russia and other selected regions of the Russian North using the European standard for respiratory diseases, in a population aged 25-64; and (2) data from a randomized cross-sectional epidemiological study, with subjects from three different climatic-geographical regions of Russia.
(1) the respiratory disease-related mortality rates in the majority of Russian Northern regions were much higher compared to the national average. Although death rates from chronic lower respiratory diseases were higher among the Northern regions and in the whole of Russia relative to the countries of European Union (EU), the cause of death in the populations of the Northern regions tend to be lower respiratory infections and pneumonia; and (2) despite the absence of any significant differences in the prevalence of smoking, the prevalence of chronic respiratory diseases (COPD) is significantly higher in Far North Yakutsk compared to the other two regions in this study-Chelyabinsk and Vologda. The status of hyperborean had the highest chance of a significant contribution to COPD and cardiorespiratory pathology among all other risk factors. The results revealed a need for effective targeted strategies for primary and secondary prevention of chronic respiratory diseases for the populations of the Northern regions of Russia.
The revealed regional distinctions regarding the prevalence of, and mortality from, chronic respiratory diseases should be taken into consideration when designing integrated programs for chronic non-communicable disease prevention in these regions.
Notes
Cites: JAMA. 2004 Jun 2;291(21):2616-22 PMID 15173153
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2003 Feb;21(2):347-60 PMID 12608452
Cites: Lancet. 1997 May 24;349(9064):1498-504 PMID 9167458
Cites: Prev Med. 1997 Sep-Oct;26(5 Pt 1):678-85 PMID 9327477
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2002 Oct;20(4):799-805 PMID 12412667
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2009;4:337-49 PMID 19802349
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Sep 1;370(9589):765-73 PMID 17765526
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2014 Sep 12;9:963-74 PMID 25246783
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2006 Feb;27(2):397-412 PMID 16452599
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 1995 May-Jun;11(3):163-9 PMID 7662395
Cites: Proc Am Thorac Soc. 2005;2(1):8-11 PMID 16113462
PubMed ID
28933768 View in PubMed
Less detail

72 records – page 1 of 8.