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36 records – page 1 of 4.

[Administration of naloxone to newborn infants at obstetric departments in Norway]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46550
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Jan 30;114(3):305-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-30-1994
Author
I. Fagerli
T W Hansen
Author Affiliation
Neonatalseksjonen, Barneklinikken, Rikshospitalet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Jan 30;114(3):305-7
Date
Jan-30-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analgesia, Obstetrical - statistics & numerical data
Drug Utilization
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Meperidine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Naloxone - administration & dosage - adverse effects - contraindications
Norway
Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Respiration - drug effects
Abstract
Recommendations for the dosage of naloxone to reverse opiate depression in neonates were revised by the American Academy of Pediatrics in 1989. In order to ascertain the extent to which these new recommendations have been implemented in Norway, we sent questionnaires to the maternity centres by mail. The responses from 60 different centres covered 88% of the total births in Norway in 1991. The dosages of naloxone used varied from 0.01-0.1 mg/kg, and the reported frequency of use in newborns varied between
PubMed ID
8191424 View in PubMed
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Bioactive food stimulants of sympathetic activity: effect on 24-h energy expenditure and fat oxidation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61489
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Jun;59(6):733-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
A. Belza
A B Jessen
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Centre for Advanced Food Studies, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark. anbe@kvl.dk
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2005 Jun;59(6):733-41
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Caffeine - pharmacology
Calcium, Dietary - pharmacology
Calorimetry, Indirect
Capsaicin - pharmacology
Catechin - pharmacology
Central Nervous System Stimulants - pharmacology
Cross-Over Studies
Dietary Supplements
Double-Blind Method
Energy Metabolism - drug effects - physiology
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Male
Obesity - drug therapy
Oxidation-Reduction
Plant Extracts
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration - drug effects
Tea
Thermogenesis - drug effects
Tyrosine - pharmacology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Bioactive food ingredients influence energy balance by exerting weak thermogenic effects. We studied whether the thermogenic effect of a combination of capsaicin, green tea extract (catechins and caffeine), tyrosine, and calcium was maintained after 7-day treatment and whether local effects in the gastric mucosa were involved in the efficacy. DESIGN: The present study was designed as a 3-way crossover, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded intervention.SETTING: Department of Human Nutrition, RVAU, Denmark. SUBJECTS: A total of 19 overweight to obese men (BMI: 28.0+/-2.7 kg/m2) were recruited by advertising locally. INTERVENTION: The subjects took the supplements for a period of 7 days. The supplements were administrated as a simple supplement with the bioactive ingredients, a similar enterocoated version, or placebo. In all, 24-h energy expenditure (EE), substrate oxidations, spontaneous physical activity (SPA), and heart rate were measured in respiration chambers on the seventh day of each test period.Results:After adjustment for changes in body weight and SPA, 24-h EE was increased by 160 kJ/day (95% CI: 15-305) by the simple preparation as compared to placebo, whereas the enterocoated preparation had no such effect (53 kJ/day, -92 to 198); simple vs enterocoated versions (P=0.09). The simple preparation produced a deficit in 24-h energy balance of 193 kJ/day (49-338, P=0.03). Fat and carbohydrate oxidation were equally increased by the supplements.CONCLUSION: A supplement containing bioactive food ingredients increased daily EE by approximately 200 kJ or 2%, without raising the heart rate or any observed adverse effects. The lack of effect of the enterocoated preparation suggests that a local action of capsaicin in the gastric mucosa is a prerequisite for exerting the thermogenic effect.
PubMed ID
15870822 View in PubMed
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Capture and medetomidine-ketamine anesthesia of free-ranging wolverines (Gulo gulo).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87068
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2008 Jan;44(1):133-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Fahlman Asa
Arnemo Jon M
Persson Jens
Segerström Peter
Nyman Görel
Author Affiliation
Section of Anesthesiology and Emergency, Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden. asa_fahlman@hotmail.com
Source
J Wildl Dis. 2008 Jan;44(1):133-42
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acid-Base Equilibrium - drug effects
Age Factors
Anesthetics, Dissociative - administration & dosage
Animals
Animals, Wild - physiology
Blood Gas Analysis - veterinary
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Drug Combinations
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Hypnotics and Sedatives - administration & dosage
Immobilization - methods - veterinary
Ketamine - administration & dosage
Male
Medetomidine - administration & dosage
Mustelidae - physiology
Oximetry - methods - veterinary
Oxygen - analysis - metabolism
Respiration - drug effects
Sweden
Abstract
Capture and anesthesia with medetomidine-ketamine were evaluated in free-ranging wolverines (Gulo gulo) immobilized for marking with radiocollars or intraperitoneal radiotransmitters in Norrbotten, Sweden, during early June 2004 and 2005. Twelve juvenile wolverines were captured by hand and injected with 0.14 +/- 0.03 mg/kg (mean +/- SD) medetomidine and 7.5 +/- 2.0 mg/kg ketamine. Twelve adult wolverines were darted from a helicopter or the ground, or captured by hand. Adults received 0.37 +/- 0.06 mg/kg medetomidine and 9.4 +/- 1.4 mg/kg ketamine. Arterial blood samples were collected between 15 min and 30 min and between 45 min and 60 min after drug administration and immediately analyzed for selected hematologic and plasma variables. Hyperthermia was recorded initially in one juvenile wolverine and 11 adults. Rectal temperature, heart rate, and lactate decreased significantly during anesthesia, whereas hemoglobin oxygen saturation, pH, partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide, and base excess increased. Adult wolverines darted from a helicopter had a significantly higher rectal temperature, higher glucose and hematocrit values, and a lower heart rate than juveniles captured by hand. Impaired arterial oxygenation was evident in all wolverines. This study provides baseline data on physiologic variables in adult and juvenile wolverines captured with different methods and anesthetized with medetomidine-ketamine.
PubMed ID
18263828 View in PubMed
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[Characteristics of the combined action of the beryllium-containing dust from complex metal ores in the Far North (clinical hygienic and experimental studies)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246864
Source
Gig Tr Prof Zabol. 1979 Sep;(9):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1979

Decreased respiratory depression during emergence from anesthesia with sevoflurane/N2O than with sevoflurane alone.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46276
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1999 Apr;46(4):335-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
S. Einarsson
A. Bengtsson
O. Stenqvist
J P Bengtson
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Reykjavik Hospital (University Teaching Hospital), Iceland. sveinng@shr.is
Source
Can J Anaesth. 1999 Apr;46(4):335-41
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anesthesia Recovery Period
Anesthetics, Inhalation - administration & dosage - blood
Carbon Dioxide - blood - metabolism
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Hysterectomy
Intubation, Intratracheal
Maximal Voluntary Ventilation - drug effects
Methyl Ethers - administration & dosage - blood
Middle Aged
Nitrous Oxide - administration & dosage - blood
Oxygen - administration & dosage - blood
Pulmonary Gas Exchange - drug effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration - drug effects
Tidal Volume - drug effects
Time Factors
Abstract
PURPOSE: To investigate ventilation and gas elimination during the emergence from inhalational anesthesia with controlled normoventilation with either sevoflurane/N2O or sevoflurane alone. METHODS: Twenty-four ASA I-II patients scheduled for abdominal hysterectomy were randomly allocated to receive either 1.3 MAC sevoflurane/N2O (n = 12) or equi-MAC sevoflurane (n = 12) in 30% oxygen (O2). Expired minute ventilation volumes (V(E)), end-tidal (ET) concentrations of O2, carbon dioxide (CO2), sevoflurane and N2O as well as pulse oximetry saturation (SpO2) and CO2 elimination rates (VCO2) were measured. The ET concentrations of sevoflurane and N2O were converted to total MAC values and gas elimination was expressed in terms of MAC reduction. Time to resumption of spontaneous breathing and extubation were recorded and arterial blood gas analysis was performed at the end of controlled normoventilation and at the beginning of spontaneous breathing. RESULTS: Resumption of spontaneous breathing and extubation were 8 and 13 min less, respectively, in the sevoflurane/N2O than in the sevoflurane group. Spontaneous breathing was resumed in both groups when pH had decreased by 0.07-0.08 and PaCO2 increased by 1.3-1.5 kPa. Depression of V(E) and VCO2 were less, and MAC reduction more rapid in the sevoflurane/N2O than in the sevoflurane group. CONCLUSIONS: Respiratory recovery was faster after sevoflurane/N2O than sevoflurane anesthesia. Changes in pH and PaCO2 rather than absolute values were important for resumption of spontaneous breathing after controlled normoventilation. In both groups, the tracheas were extubated at about 0.2 MAC.
PubMed ID
10232716 View in PubMed
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A Double-Blinded, Randomized Comparison of Medetomidine-Tiletamine-Zolazepam and Dexmedetomidine-Tiletamine-Zolazepam Anesthesia in Free-Ranging Brown Bears (Ursus Arctos).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285235
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(1):e0170764
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Núria Fandos Esteruelas
Marc Cattet
Andreas Zedrosser
Gordon B Stenhouse
Susanne Küker
Alina L Evans
Jon M Arnemo
Source
PLoS One. 2017;12(1):e0170764
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Anesthesia - veterinary
Anesthetics - pharmacology
Animals
Animals, Wild
Body Temperature - drug effects
Carbon Dioxide - blood
Datasets as Topic
Dexmedetomidine - pharmacology
Double-Blind Method
Drug Combinations
Hemodynamics - drug effects
Male
Medetomidine - pharmacology
Oxygen - blood
Oxygen Inhalation Therapy
Partial Pressure
Respiration - drug effects
Stress, Physiological - drug effects - physiology
Stress, Psychological - physiopathology
Sweden
Tiletamine - pharmacology
Ursidae - physiology
Zolazepam - pharmacology
Abstract
We compared anesthetic features, blood parameters, and physiological responses to either medetomidine-tiletamine-zolazepam or dexmedetomidine-tiletamine-zolazepam using a double-blinded, randomized experimental design during 40 anesthetic events of free-ranging brown bears (Ursus arctos) either captured by helicopter in Sweden or by culvert trap in Canada. Induction was smooth and predictable with both anesthetic protocols. Induction time, the need for supplemental drugs to sustain anesthesia, and capture-related stress were analyzed using generalized linear models, but anesthetic protocol did not differentially affect these variables. Arterial blood gases and acid-base status, and physiological responses were examined using linear mixed models. We documented acidemia (pH of arterial blood
Notes
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PubMed ID
28118413 View in PubMed
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Early safety and efficacy of fingolimod treatment in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279301
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2017 Jan;135(1):129-133
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
A. Voldsgaard
N. Koch-Henriksen
M. Magyari
F. Sellebjerg
P S Sørensen
A B Oturai
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2017 Jan;135(1):129-133
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiotoxicity - etiology
Denmark
Female
Fingolimod Hydrochloride - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Immunosuppressive Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis, Relapsing-Remitting - drug therapy
Respiration - drug effects
Abstract
Initiation of fingolimod treatment is associated with a transient decrease of heart rate, and atrioventricular (AV) conduction block may occur.
To evaluate the therapeutic effect and safety of fingolimod treatment in MS patients in Denmark with focus on cardiac and pulmonary side effects at treatment onset.
We analysed data from the first 496 fingolimod-treated Danish patients, observed for at least 3 months. In a subset of 204 patients, we monitored cardiac and pulmonary adverse effects following treatment initiation.
The overall annualized relapse rate (ARR) was 0.37 (95% CI 0.31-0.44); 0.22 (95% CI 0.03-0.81) in de novo-treated patients, 0.29 (95% CI; 0.23-0.37) in patients switching from IFN-beta or GA and 0.46 (9 5% CI 0.34-0.60) after natalizumab. In the subset of 204 patients, 8 (3.9%) required prolonged cardiac monitoring due to bradycardia and/or second-degree AV block type I. All patients recovered spontaneously. Two patients discontinued fingolimod. Eleven (5.4%) patients reported respiratory complaints and two of these patients discontinued treatment.
Fingolimod appears to be safe and effective in MS patients in a clinical setting. Mild cardiac adverse effects occurred at a similar rate as in clinical trials.
PubMed ID
27910101 View in PubMed
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[Effect of atmospheric pollution on the external respiratory function in children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42720
Source
Gig Sanit. 1975 Mar;(3):114-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1975

36 records – page 1 of 4.