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19th century pioneers of intensive therapy in North America. Part 1: George Edward Fell.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160003
Source
Crit Care Resusc. 2007 Dec;9(4):377-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Ronald V Trubuhovich
Author Affiliation
Department of Critical Care Medicine, Auckland Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. rvt.met@pl.net
Source
Crit Care Resusc. 2007 Dec;9(4):377-93
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aphorisms and Proverbs as Topic
Canada
History, 19th Century
Humans
Intensive Care - history
Intermittent Positive-Pressure Ventilation - history
Respiration, Artificial - history - instrumentation
Resuscitation - history
Tracheotomy - history
Abstract
For three decades after Marshall Hall's 1856 strictures against "forcing methods" and bellows for artificial ventilation (AV), human "forced respiration" (equivalent to intermittent positive pressure ventilation) was virtually abandoned. Various arm-chest manoeuvres often proved inadequate to save life. After doctor and engineer George Fell, of Buffalo (New York) (1849-1918), failed to save the life of an opiate-poisoned patient using Silvester's popular method, he resolved to try his animal laboratory AV method (bellows and tracheotomy). Following his first success in a landmark case (1887), he better adapted the apparatus for human use and soon succeeded with further difficult cases, but was unable to raise enthusiasm for his "Fell method" of AV. His reports of successful rescues to prestigious Washington Congresses met derision (1887) and indifference (1893), although by then they detailed 28 "human lives saved", mostly after opiate poisoning, and a switch from tracheotomies to face masks (simpler, but with a few complications). Continuing with rescues throughout the 1890s, Fell personally achieved recoveries after AV for as long as 73.5 hours (1896), and over 78 hours (1899). He argued for his method repeatedly with many talks, much documentation, and pleas for its use in other ventilatory crises. Despite his endeavours and successes, Fell was unable to secure widespread uptake of forced respiration, but others adopted his principles. Joseph O'Dwyer modified Fell's face mask-tracheotomy system by incorporating an intralaryngeal tube, and this "Fell-O'Dwyer apparatus" was used for neurosurgical cases (1894), also revolutionising intrathoracic surgery (1899).
PubMed ID
18052905 View in PubMed
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[Anesthesiologic principles used in the treatment of polio patients. A great progress in intensive care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature199624
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Jan 3;162(1):46-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-3-2000
Author
E K Tønnesen
Author Affiliation
Anaestesiologisk-intensiv afdeling, Arhus Universitetshospital, Arhus Kommunehospital.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Jan 3;162(1):46-7
Date
Jan-3-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesiology - history - trends
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
History, 20th Century
Humans
Intensive Care - history - trends
Poliomyelitis - epidemiology - history - therapy
Respiration, Artificial - history
PubMed ID
10658495 View in PubMed
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[A story about the King of Denmark's horse, a mechanical ventilator and a righteous man of nations].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197775
Source
Harefuah. 1998 Apr 15;134(8):658-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-15-1998

[From the poliomyelitis epidemic to the founding of artificial respiration centres, intensive care units and centres for home mechanical ventilation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170251
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2006 Feb 25;150(8):444-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-25-2006
Author
A F Meinesz
P J Wijkstra
J G Zijlstra
M J I J Albers
G H Köter
Author Affiliation
Universitair Medisch Centrum Groningen, afd Longziekten/Centrum voor Thuisbeademing, Groningen.
Source
Ned Tijdschr Geneeskd. 2006 Feb 25;150(8):444-9
Date
Feb-25-2006
Language
Dutch
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Disease Outbreaks - history
History, 20th Century
Home Care Services - history
Humans
Intensive Care - history
Intensive Care Units - history
Netherlands
Poliomyelitis - complications - epidemiology - history
Respiration, Artificial - history
Abstract
In 1952, Copenhagen was confronted with a poliomyelitis epidemic that involved the respiratory musculature in large numbers of patients. The anaesthetist B. Ibsen, who established carbon dioxide intoxication due to severe hypoventilation as the cause of death, proposed that the patients be treated by tracheostomy and positive pressure respiration in order to achieve better ventilation than with an iron lung. In the Netherlands, it was decided to organise the control ofthe epidemics on a nationwide basis. Various hospitals were asked to set up artificial respiration centres. In addition, the Beatrix Fund was set up in order to collect money for combating poliomyelitis. The epidemic reached the Netherlands in 1956. In Groningen University Medical Centre, 74 patients were admitted, of whom 36 had to be ventilated. In two cases, the mechanical ventilation could not be stopped and one of these was ultimately discharged home with chronic ventilation in 1960, thus becoming the first patient in the Netherlands to be given mechanical ventilation at home. The mechanical ventilation centres developed into the intensive care units as we know them today. Most of the forms of treatment now in use are based on the techniques thought up and elaborated by the pioneers working in the mechanical ventilation centres. The latest development in this series is the development of centres for home mechanical ventilation.
PubMed ID
16538846 View in PubMed
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[The beginning of intensive therapy in Denmark].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210328
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Dec 16;158(51):7423-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-16-1996
Author
B. Ibsen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Dec 16;158(51):7423-4
Date
Dec-16-1996
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
History, 20th Century
Humans
Intensive Care - history
Respiration, Artificial - history
PubMed ID
9012064 View in PubMed
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[Vladimir L'vovich Kassil' (to the 80th anniversary of birthday)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259803
Source
Anesteziol Reanimatol. 2014 Jul-Aug;59(4):79
Publication Type
Article

7 records – page 1 of 1.