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1031 records – page 1 of 104.

A 1-year follow-up of low birth weight infants with and without bronchopulmonary dysplasia: health, growth, clinical lung disease, cardiovascular and neurological sequelae.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59584
Source
Early Hum Dev. 1992 Sep;30(2):109-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1992

[2 centers initiate home respirator treatment in Denmark]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35505
Source
Nord Med. 1995;110(5):146-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995

The 6-min walk test: responses in healthy Canadians aged 45 to 85 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130789
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2011 Oct;36(5):643-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Kylie Hill
Lisa M Wickerson
Lynda J Woon
Afshin Heidar Abady
Tom J Overend
Roger S Goldstein
Dina Brooks
Author Affiliation
Department of Respirology, West Park Healthcare Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2011 Oct;36(5):643-9
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Algorithms
Exercise Test
Female
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Oxygen consumption
Physical Fitness
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Respiration
Respiratory Rate
Sex Characteristics
Tidal Volume
Time Factors
Walking
Abstract
We sought to describe responses to the 6-min walk test (6MWT) in healthy Canadian adults in order to facilitate interpretation of its results in patient populations. Seventy-seven healthy Canadians aged 45 to 85 years (65 ± 11 years, 40 females) completed this study. During a single visit, three 6MWTs were undertaken. The main outcome measure was 6-min walk distance (6MWD). Age, gender, height, and weight were recorded. In 61 (79%) participants, cardiorespiratory variables were collected during the third 6MWT using a calibrated portable gas analysis system. The 6MWD increased between the first and second test (615 ± 96 to 639 ± 98 m; p
PubMed ID
21967531 View in PubMed
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8th Annual Toronto Critical Care Medicine Symposium, 30 October-1 November 2003, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181450
Source
Crit Care. 2004 Feb;8(1):58-66
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Jeff Granton
John Granton
Author Affiliation
Programme Director, Critical Care Medicine Programme, University of Toronto, Canada. john.Granton@uhn.on.ca
Source
Crit Care. 2004 Feb;8(1):58-66
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Blood Transfusion - adverse effects - utilization
Critical Care
Cross Infection - epidemiology
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Ontario - epidemiology
Respiration, Artificial
Sepsis - therapy
Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome - epidemiology
Terminal Care
Notes
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PubMed ID
14975048 View in PubMed
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19th century pioneers of intensive therapy in North America. Part 1: George Edward Fell.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160003
Source
Crit Care Resusc. 2007 Dec;9(4):377-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Ronald V Trubuhovich
Author Affiliation
Department of Critical Care Medicine, Auckland Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. rvt.met@pl.net
Source
Crit Care Resusc. 2007 Dec;9(4):377-93
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aphorisms and Proverbs as Topic
Canada
History, 19th Century
Humans
Intensive Care - history
Intermittent Positive-Pressure Ventilation - history
Respiration, Artificial - history - instrumentation
Resuscitation - history
Tracheotomy - history
Abstract
For three decades after Marshall Hall's 1856 strictures against "forcing methods" and bellows for artificial ventilation (AV), human "forced respiration" (equivalent to intermittent positive pressure ventilation) was virtually abandoned. Various arm-chest manoeuvres often proved inadequate to save life. After doctor and engineer George Fell, of Buffalo (New York) (1849-1918), failed to save the life of an opiate-poisoned patient using Silvester's popular method, he resolved to try his animal laboratory AV method (bellows and tracheotomy). Following his first success in a landmark case (1887), he better adapted the apparatus for human use and soon succeeded with further difficult cases, but was unable to raise enthusiasm for his "Fell method" of AV. His reports of successful rescues to prestigious Washington Congresses met derision (1887) and indifference (1893), although by then they detailed 28 "human lives saved", mostly after opiate poisoning, and a switch from tracheotomies to face masks (simpler, but with a few complications). Continuing with rescues throughout the 1890s, Fell personally achieved recoveries after AV for as long as 73.5 hours (1896), and over 78 hours (1899). He argued for his method repeatedly with many talks, much documentation, and pleas for its use in other ventilatory crises. Despite his endeavours and successes, Fell was unable to secure widespread uptake of forced respiration, but others adopted his principles. Joseph O'Dwyer modified Fell's face mask-tracheotomy system by incorporating an intralaryngeal tube, and this "Fell-O'Dwyer apparatus" was used for neurosurgical cases (1894), also revolutionising intrathoracic surgery (1899).
PubMed ID
18052905 View in PubMed
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Abnormal control of ventilation in high-altitude pulmonary edema.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3383
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1988 Mar;64(3):1268-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1988
Author
P H Hackett
R C Roach
R B Schoene
G L Harrison
W J Mills
Author Affiliation
Denali Medical Research Project, Center for High Latitude Health Research, University of Alaska, Anchorage 99508.
Source
J Appl Physiol. 1988 Mar;64(3):1268-72
Date
Mar-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Altitude
Anoxemia - physiopathology
Anoxia - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Male
Oxygen - metabolism
Oxygen Inhalation Therapy
Pulmonary Edema - physiopathology - therapy
Respiration
Abstract
We wished to determine the role of hypoxic chemosensitivity in high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) by studying persons when ill and upon recovery. We studied seven males with HAPE and seventeen controls at 4,400 m on Mt. McKinley. We measured ventilatory responses to both O2 breathing and progressive poikilocapnic hypoxia. Hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR) was described by the slope relating minute ventilation to percent arterial O2 saturation (delta VE/delta SaO2%). HAPE subjects were quite hypoxemic (SaO2% 59 +/- 6 vs. 85 +/- 1, P less than 0.01) and showed a high-frequency, low-tidal-volume pattern of breathing. O2 decreased ventilation in controls (-20%, P less than 0.01) but not in HAPE subjects. The HAPE group had low HVR values (0.15 +/- 0.07 vs. 0.54 +/- 0.08, P less than 0.01), although six controls had values in the same range. The three HAPE subjects with the lowest HVR values were the most hypoxemic and had a paradoxical increase in ventilation when breathing O2. We conclude that a low HVR plays a permissive rather than causative role in the pathogenesis of HAPE and that the combination of extreme hypoxemia and low HVR may result in hypoxic depression of ventilation.
PubMed ID
3366741 View in PubMed
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Abstracts from the 14th Congress of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiologists. Uppsala, Sweden, June 28-July 2, 1977.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250477
Source
Ups J Med Sci Suppl. 1977;25:1-170
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
1977

Acceptance, avoidance, and ambiguity: conflicting social values about childhood disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170909
Source
Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2005 Dec;15(4):371-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Carol Levine
Author Affiliation
Families and Health Care Project, United Hospital Fund, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Kennedy Inst Ethics J. 2005 Dec;15(4):371-83
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Caregivers - psychology
Child
Chronic Disease - psychology
Data Collection
Dependency (Psychology)
Disabled Children - psychology
Family Relations
Home Nursing - psychology
Humans
Parents - psychology
Quebec
Respiration, Artificial - ethics - psychology
Siblings - psychology
Social Isolation
Social Justice
Social Values
Ventilators, Mechanical
Abstract
Advances in medical technology now permit children who need ventilator assistance to live at home rather than in hospitals or institutions. What does this ventilator-dependent life mean to children and their families? The impetus for this essay comes from a study of the moral experience of 12 Canadian families--parents, ventilator-dependent child, and well siblings. These families express great love for their children, take on enormous responsibilities for care, live with uncertainty, and attempt to create "normal" home environments. Nevertheless, they experience social isolation, sometimes even from their extended families and health care providers. Their lives are constrained in many ways. The challenges faced by parents of technology-dependent children raise questions of justice within society and within families.
PubMed ID
16453960 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and the growth of lung function: three cross-sectional surveys of an Inuit community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3566
Source
Respiration. 1994;61(4):187-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
A. Rode
R J Shephard
Author Affiliation
School of Physical and Health Education, University of Toronto, Ont., Canada.
Source
Respiration. 1994;61(4):187-94
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Body Composition - physiology
Body Height
Canada
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Humans
Inuits
Lung - growth & development - physiology
Male
Maximal Midexpiratory Flow Rate - physiology
Pulmonary Ventilation - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration - physiology
Smoking - physiopathology
Somatotypes
Vital Capacity - physiology
Abstract
The influence of acculturation to a sedentary lifestyle upon the growth and development of lung volumes has been studied in Inuit children aged 9-19 years. Surveys were conducted in the circumpolar community of Igloolik (69 degrees 40'N, 81 degrees W) in 1969/70, 1979/80 and 1989/90. Over this period, the children showed little change of height or body mass at any given age, but a progressive loss of what initially had been a high level of health-related fitness. The sample for each survey comprised about 70% of children in the chosen age range: in the most recent study 87 males and 65 females. Respiratory data included forced vital capacity, one-second forced expiratory volume, maximal mid-expiratory flow rate (second and third surveys only), smoking habits and respiratory health. In each of the 3 surveys, many of the older children in the community were regular smokers. The average cigarette consumption currently rises progressively to 13 +/- 8 cigarettes/day in 87% of males and 11 +/- 7 cigarettes/day in 95% of females over 17 years of age. Nevertheless, lung volumes show the anticipated increase as a logarithmic function of stature. Furthermore, statistically fitted curves show only minor inter-survey differences in volumes for a given standing height. We thus conclude that the deterioration in other aspects of health-related fitness has not yet influenced the growth and development of respiratory function within this Inuit population.
PubMed ID
7973102 View in PubMed
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1031 records – page 1 of 104.