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Health planning in Alaska: A new agenda for the 80s

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96198
Publication Type
Article
Date
March 1981
Author
Dixon, M
Author Affiliation
WAMI Medical Education Program, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Date
March 1981
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska State Legislature
Boroughs
Health insurance
Health planning agencies
National Health Planning and Resources Development Act of 1974
Native nonprofit corporations
Reagan administration
Transportation patterns
Abstract
Consistent with federal goals, the current goals of Alaska's health planning agencies have been to encourage prevention of health problems through an emphasis on health education, to allocate new technology within existing systems without unnecessary duplication, and to achieve levels of health care considered appropriate for community size and function. The challenge for health planning agencies in Alaska today is to develop an agenda for the next decade that will address the major changes anticipated in the state and assist in planning health services that are appropriate and responsive to those changes. In the short term, this requires not only a reformulation of goals but also a restructuring of the health planning agencies to address these new goals with the necessary expertise and with organizations that are streamlined to be efficient and responsive.
Notes
Available upon request at the Alaska Medical Library, located on the second floor of UAA/APU Consortium Library. Ask for accession no. 96198.
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Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):492-500
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1968
transpor- tation facilities, and, finally, the linking of communities at points of resource develop- Arch Environ Health-Vol 17, Oct 1968 500 ALASKA-FITZGERALD ment with a large urban center providing a full complex of services. Such communities could reasonably support a population of 5,000 or
  1 document  
Author
FitzGerald, J.H
Author Affiliation
Anchorage, Alaska
Source
Papers presented at the Symposium on Circumpolar Health Related Problems, Fairbanks, Alaska, July 23-28, 1967. Archives of Environmental Health. 17(4):492-500
Date
Oct-1968
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Arctic
Climate
Population trends
Resource development
Topography
Documents

67-10-Alaska the Land and the People.pdf

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The Arctic: the new business hotspot or a sustainable prosperity project of co-management?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297053
Source
Arctic Summer College. Fellow Paper. 16 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2015
limited due to climate change and the receding ice cover. The assessment of potential impacts of resource development should to some extent rely on traditional knowledge and could benefit climate change researchers in Western academia and policy-making circles as well as help the indigenous
  1 document  
Author
Arruda, Gisele
Source
Arctic Summer College. Fellow Paper. 16 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
510521
Keywords
Climate change
Economic development
Indigenous populations
Resource development
Abstract
The Arctic plays a key role in the global climate. As the ice retreats the current challenges concerning the environment, maritime safety, tourism and oil and gas activity will intensify even more the effects of climate change on Arctic ecosystems and communities. Climate change and modernization have thus become two intrinsically linked forces that severely alter the context in which the indigenous populations of the region sustain a livelihood (van Voorst, 2009). Local animal and plant species are of dietary importance, while hunting, fishing or foraging are all of cultural and social value. The availability of many species that the Arctic indigenous people rely on for food has become limited due to climate change and the receding ice cover. The assessment of potential impacts of resource development should to some extent rely on traditional knowledge and could benefit climate change researchers in Western academia and policy-making circles as well as help the indigenous communities to tackle the difficult task of promoting their local adaptation. A joint assessment and management on impacts issues must be performed based on mutual consent, information exchange, responsible coordination and cooperation. Social impact assessment (SIAs) serve as means of determining how and to what extent specialized social groups will become better or worse off as a result of certain externally generated actions. Assessments have been largely about indigenous people, not by them (Cochran et al, 2013:558). This is why it becomes crucial to enrich SIAs with detail and context that focus on the indigenous perspective, in which economy and culture are more closely intertwined. The benefits of the Arctic emerging economy may be seen in the creation of economic development, but it must be part of a sustainable prosperity project of comanagement with triple gain to economy, environment and communities.
Documents

ASC-Paper_Arruda_Gisele.pdf

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The View from the Top: searching for responses to a rapidly changing Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297141
Source
United Nations Environment Programme. UNEP Year Book 2013. p.19-35.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2014
natural resource development. This is one of a series of Arctic geopolitical issues being resolved. Outstanding issues include border disagreements between Denmark/Greenland and Canada; issues concerning the Northwest Passage; and a difference in opinion in regard to the interpretation of the Treaty
  1 document  
Source
United Nations Environment Programme. UNEP Year Book 2013. p.19-35.
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
1381844
Keywords
Arctic
Sea ice
Climate change
Air temperatures
Black carbon (soot)
Methane
Permafrost
Marine mammals
Ocean acidification
Resource development
Fisheries
Documents
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Source
Pages 364-366 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
, consumption pattern changes. pressure on resource management and land use, etc). Finally, induced impacts of direct and indirect health effects are illustrated by case study examples of mineral resource development projects. Cumulauve impacts of mining are highlighted in view of the need to evaluate and
  1 document  
Author
Grondin, J
Bruneau, S
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Service, Centre for Public Health, Québec, Canada
Source
Pages 364-366 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Arctic
Contaminants
Environmental health
Food chain
Health effects
Human
Impacts
Inuit
Mineral resource development
Mining
Risk
Abstract
The presentation focuses on the repercussions of mining on the relations between the physical and human environments in the Arctic. Direct and indirect effects of mining on Inuit health are discussed from the general perspective of environmental health. First, potential direct effects on the human environment are described from the viewpoint of occupational health (traumatic, physical, chemical, biological risks) and the population's risks in regard to marine and land transportation. Then, indirect toxicological risks (mainly through the contamination of the food chain) as well as social and cultural impacts on human health are discussed (e.g., through relational stress, consumption pattern changes, pressure on resource management and land use, etc.). Finally, induced impacts of direct and indirect health effects are illustrated by case study examples of mineral resource development projects. Cumulative impacts of mining are highlighted in view of the need to evaluate and monitor long-term as well as short-term health effects through the integration of multidisciplinary evaluations and local knowledge, expectancies, and issues.
Documents
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