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Adaptations to Short, Frequent Sessions of Endurance and Strength Training Are Similar to Longer, Less Frequent Exercise Sessions When the Total Volume Is the Same.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274072
Source
J Strength Cond Res. 2015 Nov;29 Suppl 11:S46-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
Anders Kilen
Line B Hjelvang
Niels Dall
Nanna L Kruse
Nikolai B Nordsborg
Source
J Strength Cond Res. 2015 Nov;29 Suppl 11:S46-51
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, physiological - physiology
Adult
Denmark
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Male
Military Personnel
Muscle Strength - physiology
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Conditioning, Human - methods
Resistance Training - methods
Abstract
The hypothesis that the distribution of weekly training across several short sessions, as opposed to fewer longer sessions, enhances maximal strength gain without compromising maximal oxygen uptake was evaluated. Twenty-nine subjects completed an 8-week controlled parallel-group training intervention. One group ("micro training" [MI]: n = 21) performed nine 15-minute training sessions weekly, whereas a second group ("classical training" [CL]: n = 8) completed exactly the same training on a weekly basis but as three 45-minute sessions. For each group, each session comprised exclusively strength, high-intensity cardiovascular training or muscle endurance training. Both groups increased shuttle run performance (MI: 1,373 ± 133 m vs. 1,498 ± 126 m, p = 0.05; CL: 1,074 ± 213 m vs. 1,451 ± 202 m, p
PubMed ID
26506198 View in PubMed
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Anabolic androgenic steroids in the general population: user characteristics and associations with substance use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127522
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2012;18(2):83-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Anders Hakansson
Kajsa Mickelsson
Camilla Wallin
Mats Berglund
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. anders_c.hakansson@med.lu.se
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2012;18(2):83-90
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Anabolic Agents
Androgens
Data Collection
Educational Status
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prescription Drugs
Resistance Training
Socioeconomic Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To analyse correlates of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) use in the general male population.
A national household survey.
Individuals aged 15-64 years in Sweden.
AAS use and potential correlates of AAS use, including demographic data, financial situation, physical training, and substance use. In hierarchical logistic regression analyses, lifetime users of AAS (n = 240) were compared to all nonusers (n = 13,920) and to nonusers who reported that they had been offered AAS (n = 487).
AAS use was most strongly associated with a lifetime history of illicit drug use and the misuse of prescription drugs. When controlling for substance use, AAS was associated with physical training and lower education. Illicit drug use and misuse of prescription drugs separated AAS users from nonusers who had been offered AAS. No associations were seen with AUDIT scores for risk alcohol drinking.
In this general population survey in men, lifetime use of AAS appears to share common characteristics with illicit substance use. Both substance use variables and physical training remained associated with AAS use when controlling for one another.
PubMed ID
22286840 View in PubMed
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Anthropometric, metabolic, psychosocial and dietary factors associated with dropout in overweight and obese postmenopausal women engaged in a 6-month weight loss programme: a MONET study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147225
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Apr;103(8):1230-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Virginie Messier
Jessy Hayek
Antony D Karelis
Lyne Messier
Eric Doucet
Denis Prud'homme
Rémi Rabasa-Lhoret
Irene Strychar
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, Université de Montréal, Montreal, QC, Canada. virginie.messier@ircm.qc.ca
Source
Br J Nutr. 2010 Apr;103(8):1230-5
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diet, Reducing
Female
Ghrelin - blood
Humans
Insulin - blood
Leptin - blood
Life Style
Middle Aged
Obesity - rehabilitation
Ontario
Overweight - psychology - rehabilitation
Postmenopause
Resistance Training - methods
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Concept
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to examine anthropometric, metabolic, psychosocial and dietary factors associated with dropout in a 6-month weight loss intervention aimed at reducing body weight by 10 %. The study sample included 137 sedentary, overweight and obese postmenopausal women, participating in a weight loss intervention that consisted of either energy restriction (ER) or ER with resistance training (ER+RT). Anthropometric (BMI, percent lean body mass, percent fat mass, visceral adipose tissue and waist circumference), metabolic (total energy expenditure, RMR, insulin sensitivity and fasting plasma levels of leptin and ghrelin), psychosocial (body esteem, self-esteem, stress, dietary restraint, disinhibition, hunger, quality of life, self-efficacy, perceived benefits for controlling weight and perceived risk) and dietary (3-d food record) variables were measured. Thirty subjects out of 137 dropped out of the weight loss programme (22 %), with no significant differences in dropout rates between those in the ER and the ER+RT groups. Overall, amount of weight loss was significantly lower in dropouts than in completers ( - 1.7 (sd 3.5) v. - 5.6 (sd 4.3) kg, P
PubMed ID
19930768 View in PubMed
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Assessing the effect of high-repetitive single limb exercises (HRSLE) on exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): study protocol for randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122375
Source
Trials. 2012;13:114
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Andre Nyberg
Britta Lindström
Karin Wadell
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå 90187, Sweden. andre.nyberg@physiother.umu.se
Source
Trials. 2012;13:114
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - etiology
Depression - etiology
Exercise Test
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Humans
Lower Extremity
Male
Muscle strength
Muscle, Skeletal - physiopathology
Physical Endurance
Prospective Studies
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Research Design
Resistance Training
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Upper Extremity
Abstract
Single-limb knee extension exercises have been found to be effective at improving lower extremity exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Since the positive local physiological effects of exercise training only occur in the engaged muscle(s), should upper extremity muscles also be included to determine the effect of single limb exercises in COPD patients.
a prospective, assessor-blind, block randomized controlled, parallel-group multicenter trial.
stage II-IV COPD patients, > 40?years of age, ex-smokers, with stable medical treatment will be included starting May 2011. Recruitment at three locations in Sweden.
1) high-repetitive single limb exercise (HRSLE) training with elastic bands, 60 minutes, three times/week for 8?weeks combined with four sessions of 60 minutes patient education, or 2) the same patient education alone.
Primary: determine the effects of HRSLE on local muscle endurance capacity (measured as meters walked during 6-minute walk test and rings moved on 6-minute ring and pegboard test) and quality of life (measured as change on the Swedish version of the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire). Secondary: effects on maximal strength, muscular endurance, dyspnea, self-efficacy, anxiety and depression. The relationship between changes in health-related variables and changes in exercise capacity, sex-related differences in training effects, feasibility of the program, strategies to determine adequate starting resistance and provide accurate resistance for each involved movement and the relationship between muscle fatigue and dyspnea in the different exercise tests will also be analyzed. Randomization: performed by a person independent of the recruitment process and using a computer random number generator. Stratification by center and gender with a 1:1 allocation to the intervention or control using random block sizes. Blinding: all outcome assessors will be blinded to group assignment.
The results of this project will contribute to increase the body of knowledge regarding COPD and HRSLE.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22823966 View in PubMed
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Brachial neuropraxia in Canadian Atlantic University sport football players: what is the incidence of "stingers"?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120419
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2012 Nov;22(6):472-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Rebecca M E Charbonneau
Sonja A McVeigh
Kara Thompson
Author Affiliation
Division of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. rebecca.charbonneau@dal.ca
Source
Clin J Sport Med. 2012 Nov;22(6):472-7
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology
Body mass index
Brachial Plexus Neuritis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Football - injuries
Humans
Incidence
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Paresthesia - epidemiology
Resistance Training
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Universities - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the incidence of brachial neuropraxia (stingers) among varsity football players during the 2010 season; (2) to determine if associations exist between sustaining a stinger and previous history of stingers, years played, equipment, age, body mass index (BMI), and conditioning; and (3) to provide descriptive statistics regarding stingers and position played, symptoms, activity during injury, mechanism of tackling, and reporting of stingers.
Retrospective.
Canadian Atlantic University Sport football league.
Two hundred forty-four players.
Two written questionnaires.
Number of players experiencing stingers that occurred during the 2010 season.
The incidence was 26% (64 of 244). A multivariate analysis revealed that previous history of a stinger (P
PubMed ID
23006981 View in PubMed
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Changes in corticospinal excitability during an acute bout of resistance exercise in the elbow flexors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260102
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2014;114(7):1545-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ilona Ruotsalainen
Juha P Ahtiainen
Dawson J Kidgell
Janne Avela
Source
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2014;114(7):1545-53
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Electric Stimulation
Evoked Potentials, Motor
Female
Finland
Humans
Isometric Contraction
Male
Muscle Fatigue
Muscle, Skeletal - innervation
Pyramidal Tracts - physiology
Resistance Training
Time Factors
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Upper Extremity
Young Adult
Abstract
Hypertrophic resistance exercise (HRE) induces central and peripheral fatigue. However, more detailed information about changes in corticospinal excitability remains to be elucidated.
Eleven volunteers participated in the upper arm HRE which included one repetition maximum (1 RM) control contractions and three sets of 13 RM (SET1-3). Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied during maximal isometric voluntary contraction (MVC) at the end of each set and during control contractions to study changes in corticospinal excitability. Electrical stimulation was used in order to measure peripheral changes.
MVC decreased after each set when compared to control contractions. Motor evoked potential (MEP) were 138.7 ± 52.7 % (p 
PubMed ID
24752228 View in PubMed
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Changes in objective and self-reported measures of physical capacity after an intervention in obese older women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144220
Source
J Women Aging. 2010;22(1):34-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Danielle R Bouchard
Lisa Soucy
Martin Sénéchal
Isabelle J Dionne
Martin Brochu
Author Affiliation
Research Centre on Aging-Health and Social Services Centre, Sherbrooke University Institute of Geriatrics, Faculty of Physical Education and Sports, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Women Aging. 2010;22(1):34-46
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Activities of Daily Living - psychology
Aged - physiology - psychology
Attitude to Health
Body Composition
Combined Modality Therapy
Diet, Reducing - methods
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Patient Education as Topic
Physical Fitness - physiology - psychology
Quality of Life - psychology
Quebec
Resistance Training - methods
Statistics, nonparametric
Treatment Outcome
Women - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine if objective and self-reported measures of physical capacity are two equivalent methods to detect changes following an intervention in obese older women. 36 obese women aged between 55 and 75 years participated in a 3-month study with the aim of improving physical capacity by caloric restriction and/or resistance training. Physical capacity was measured objectively with 10 different tests and self-reported with the SF-36 physical functioning score (SF-36 PF score). Then the performance-to-objective tests were computed using quartiles to provide a baseline global physical capacity score. The mean percentage of change of the 10 tests as well as the SF-36 PF score were also calculated after the study. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray (DXA) absorptiometry. The baseline global physical capacity score and the SF-36 PF score were significantly correlated at baseline (r = 0.43; P
PubMed ID
20391147 View in PubMed
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Combined resistance and balance-jumping exercise reduces older women's injurious falls and fractures: 5-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273603
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Sep;44(5):784-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2015
Author
Saija Karinkanta
Pekka Kannus
Kirsti Uusi-Rasi
Ari Heinonen
Harri Sievänen
Source
Age Ageing. 2015 Sep;44(5):784-9
Date
Sep-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidental Falls - prevention & control
Age Factors
Aged
Aging
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Fractures, Bone - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Incidence
Independent living
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Muscle strength
Odds Ratio
Postural Balance
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Resistance Training
Risk factors
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Women's health
Abstract
previously, a randomised controlled exercise intervention study (RCT) showed that combined resistance and balance-jumping training (COMB) improved physical functioning and bone strength. The purpose of this follow-up study was to assess whether this exercise intervention had long-lasting effects in reducing injurious falls and fractures.
five-year health-care register-based follow-up study after a 1-year, four-arm RCT.
community-dwelling older women in Finland.
one hundred and forty-five of the original 149 RCT participants; women aged 70-78 years at the beginning.
participants' health-care visits were collected from computerised patient register. An injurious fall was defined as an event in which the subject contacted the health-care professionals or was taken to a hospital, due to a fall. The rate of injured fallers was assessed by Cox proportional hazards model (hazard ratio, HR), and the rate of injurious falls and fractures by Poisson regression (risk ratio, RR).
eighty-one injurious falls including 26 fractures occurred during the follow-up. The rate of injured fallers was 62% lower in COMB group compared with the controls (HR 0.38, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.85). In addition, COMB group had 51% less injurious falls (RR 0.49, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.98) and 74% less fractures (RR 0.26, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.97).
home-dwelling older women who participated in a 12-month intensive multi-component exercise training showed a reduced incidence for injurious falls during 5-year post-intervention period. Reduction in fractures was also evident. These long-term effects need to be confirmed in future studies.
PubMed ID
25990940 View in PubMed
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A comparison of training and physical performance of police students at the start and the end of three-year police education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259911
Source
J Strength Cond Res. 2014 May;28(5):1394-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
Pål Lagestad
Roland van den Tillaar
Source
J Strength Cond Res. 2014 May;28(5):1394-400
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Exercise Test
Female
Humans
Male
Muscle strength
Muscle, Skeletal - physiology
Norway
Physical Conditioning, Human - methods - physiology - psychology
Physical Endurance - physiology
Police - education
Questionnaires
Resistance Training
Running - physiology
Sex Factors
Students
Task Performance and Analysis
Work Capacity Evaluation
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose was to compare male and female police students exercise and physical performances at the beginning and the end of a 3-year police education. Two hundred thirty-five subjects answered the survey about exercise and 85 subjects (58 men: age = 23.7 ± 2.8 years, body mass = 82.1 ± 7.8 kg, height = 1.83 ± 0.06 m; 27 women: age = 24.9 ± 3.1 years, body mass = 66 ± 8.5 kg, height = 1.70 ± 0.09 m) participated in the 4 physical exercises (bench press, pull-ups, standing long jump, and 3,000-m run). It was found that the priority of maximum strength training increased (p
PubMed ID
24755870 View in PubMed
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91 records – page 1 of 10.