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Diabetes care and mental illness: the social organization of food in a residential care facility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107171
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 Jul-Aug;104(4):e330-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ruth H Lowndes
Jan E Angus
Elizabeth Peter
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto. ruth.lowndes@utoronto.ca.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 Jul-Aug;104(4):e330-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Diabetes Mellitus - therapy
Eating
Female
Food Services - economics - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Disorders - complications
Nutrition Policy
Ontario
Qualitative Research
Residential Facilities - economics - organization & administration
Resource Allocation
Rural Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Abstract
To explore the social organization of food provision and dietary intake in seriously mentally ill people with diabetes who reside in a for-profit group home.
Institutional ethnography was used to explore diabetes-related care practices among 26 women in a rural residential care facility in southern Ontario. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with residents with diabetes, care providers, field workers, and health professionals. Observations and document analysis were also used to understand the lack of congruence between diabetes guidelines and the possibilities for diabetes management within the confines of group home care.
Although it was mandated in group home guidelines that "Health Canada's Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide" (2007) be followed, menus were planned within the context of a limited food budget of approximately $1.91 per day per resident. Group home policies regulated systems of safety, reporting, and financial accountability, but not health promotion. Inspections carried out by the Public Health Department focused primarily on food safety during handling, preparation, and storage, and compliance to regulations regarding environmental cleanliness and infection control.
Resource rationing found in group home care exacerbates illness in an already marginalized group. Financial support is required to enable provision of healthy food choices, including dairy products, fresh fruits, and vegetables. Additional support is required for care of co-morbid conditions such as diabetes for associated food costs and education to improve outcomes. Group home policies must take into consideration health threats to this population and give primacy to health promotion and illness prevention.
PubMed ID
24044475 View in PubMed
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Low cost effective rehabilitation for drug dependent persons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246125
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1980 Feb;57(2):10-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1980

Residential crisis units. Are we missing out on a good idea?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174556
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2004;23(1):65-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Laura McCabe
Dale Butterill
Paula Goering
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 2004;23(1):65-74
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Consumer Participation - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis - statistics & numerical data
Crisis Intervention - economics - organization & administration
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Services Needs and Demand - statistics & numerical data
Homeless Persons - psychology
Hospitalization - economics
Hotlines
Humans
Length of Stay
Mentally Ill Persons - psychology
Peer Group
Residential Facilities - economics - organization & administration
Self Care
Social Support
Abstract
Residential Crisis Units (RCU) are non-hospital-based facilities that provide mental health crisis intervention. This paper reviews the RCU literature base and finds good evidence of the ability of RCUs to function as alternatives to hospitalization for many consumers, with equivalent effectiveness and for significantly less cost. Despite this promising research, the RCU model has not been widely adopted. Using two crisis units as case examples as well as key informant interviews, this paper explores factors affecting the lack of dissemination and potential barriers to the growth of the RCU model.
PubMed ID
15920883 View in PubMed
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