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Abide with me: religious group identification among older adults promotes health and well-being by maintaining multiple group memberships.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113579
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(7):869-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Renate Ysseldyk
S Alexander Haslam
Catherine Haslam
Author Affiliation
School of Psychology, University of Exeter, Exeter, United Kingdom. r.ysseldyk@uq.edu.au
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2013;17(7):869-79
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Data Collection
Depression - psychology
Female
Great Britain
Humans
Male
Mental Health - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Religion and Psychology
Residential Facilities
Social Identification
Social Support
Abstract
Aging is associated with deterioration in health and well-being, but previous research suggests that this can be attenuated by maintaining group memberships and the valued social identities associated with them. In this regard, religious identification may be especially beneficial in helping individuals withstand the challenges of aging, partly because religious identity serves as a basis for a wider social network of other group memberships. This paper aims to examine relationships between religion (identification and group membership) and well-being among older adults. The contribution of having and maintaining multiple group memberships in mediating these relationships is assessed, and also compared to patterns associated with other group memberships (social and exercise).
Study 1 (N = 42) surveyed older adults living in residential care homes in Canada, who completed measures of religious identity, other group memberships, and depression. Study 2 (N = 7021) longitudinally assessed older adults in the UK on similar measures, but with the addition of perceived physical health.
In Study 1, religious identification was associated with fewer depressive symptoms, and membership in multiple groups mediated that relationship. However, no relationships between social or exercise groups and mental health were evident. Study 2 replicated these patterns, but additionally, maintaining multiple group memberships over time partially mediated the relationship between religious group membership and physical health.
Together these findings suggest that religious social networks are an especially valuable source of social capital among older adults, supporting well-being directly and by promoting additional group memberships (including those that are non-religious).
PubMed ID
23711247 View in PubMed
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Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):123-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Judith A DeJong
Stanley R Holder
Author Affiliation
Lanham, MD 20706, USA. judithdejong@comcast.net
Source
Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2006;13(2):123-51
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Education, Special - organization & administration
Educational Status
Female
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American - education - psychology
Male
Models, Educational
Models, Psychological
Organizational Objectives
Organizational Policy
Program Evaluation
Psychosocial Deprivation
Residential Facilities - organization & administration
Schools - organization & administration
Social Problems - ethnology
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Therapeutic Community
United States
Abstract
This off-reservation boarding school serves over 600 students in grades 4-12; approximately 85% of the students reside in campus dormitories. After having documented significant improvement on a number of outcomes during a previous High Risk Youth Prevention demonstration grant, the site submitted a Therapeutic Residential Model proposal, requesting funding to continue successful elements developed under the demonstration grant and to expand mental health services. The site received Therapeutic Residential Model funding for school year 2001-2002. Once funds were received, the site chose to shift Therapeutic Residential Model funds to an intensive academic enhancement effort. While not in compliance with the Therapeutic Residential Model initiative and therefore not funded in subsequent years, this site created the opportunity to enhance the research design by providing a naturally occurring placebo condition at a site with extensive cross-sectional data baselines that addressed issues related to current federal educational policies.
PubMed ID
17602403 View in PubMed
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[Adequacy of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools of northern Mexico].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143615
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2010 Jan-Feb;52(1):23-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Joel Monárrez-Espino
Graciela Ivette Béjar-Lío
Guillermo Vázquez-Mendoza
Author Affiliation
Unidad de Investigación en Epidemiología Clínica, Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Chihuahua, México.
Source
Salud Publica Mex. 2010 Jan-Feb;52(1):23-9
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - analysis
Dietary Fats - analysis
Dietary Proteins - analysis
Energy intake
Female
Food Services
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Menu Planning
Mexico
Micronutrients - analysis
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Residential Facilities
Schools
Abstract
To assess the adequacy and variability of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools.
Records of food and drinks served for meals, weighed daily, were obtained from Monday through Friday for 10 consecutive weeks in two selected boarding schools. Nutrient intake for Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays was calculated and analyzed for weeks 3, 5 and 7.
The number of food items used per week ranged from 33 to 46. The most frequently utilized items were cooking oil, fortified corn tortilla, milk, onion, sugar and beans. Total energy served per day fluctuated between 1309 and 2919 Kcal; proteins comprised 10.5 to 21.2% (45 to 127 g/day), carbohydrates 40.7 to 61.9% (145 to 433 g/day), and lipids 22.5 to 48.1% (45 to 125 g/day) of the total. Daily micronutrient content ranges were: iron 15-33 mg, calcium 686-1795 mg, zinc 8-19 mg, vitamin A 118-756 mcg, vitamin B(9) 42-212 mcg, and vitamin B(12) 0.8-5 mcg.
There was significant daily variability in the diet, which was hypercaloric due to the high lipid content, and yet insufficient in vitamins B(9), B(12) and A.
PubMed ID
20464250 View in PubMed
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Admissions of phenylketonuric patients to residential institutions before and after screening programs of the newborn infant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature253209
Source
J Pediatr. 1974 Sep;85(3):383-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1974

[Advice about the types of residence for elderly sick patients. A study of the forms of residence preferred by 470 pensioners].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236993
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1986 May 19;148(21):1297-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-19-1986

Alternative level of care: Canada's hospital beds, the evidence and options.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107861
Source
Healthc Policy. 2013 Aug;9(1):26-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Jason M Sutherland
R Trafford Crump
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Services and Policy Research, School of Population and Public Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.
Source
Healthc Policy. 2013 Aug;9(1):26-34
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Capacity building
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated - organization & administration
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data - supply & distribution
Humans
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Reimbursement, Incentive - organization & administration
Residential Facilities - supply & distribution
Abstract
Patients designated as alternative level of care (ALC) are an ongoing concern for healthcare policy makers across Canada. These patients occupy valuable hospital beds and limit access to acute care services. The objective of this paper is to present policy alternatives to address underlying factors associated with ALC bed use. Three alternatives, and their respective limitations and structural challenges, are discussed. Potential solutions may require a mix of policy options proposed here. Inadequate policy jeopardizes new acute care activity-based funding schemes in British Columbia and Ontario. Failure to address this issue could exacerbate pressures on the existing bottlenecks in the community care system in these and other provinces.
Notes
Cites: Healthc Pap. 2000 Spring;1(2):13-3512811063
Cites: CMAJ. 2004 May 25;170(11):1678-8615159366
Cites: Healthc Pap. 2004;5(1):34-9; discussion 96-915496813
Cites: J Aging Soc Policy. 2004;16(4):17-3815724571
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2006 Apr;61(4):367-7316611703
Cites: Health Econ Policy Law. 2007 Oct;2(Pt 4):419-2718634642
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2009 Aug;44(4):1188-21019490159
Cites: CMAJ. 2010 Apr 6;182(6):53520194558
Cites: BMJ. 2011;342:d90521444642
Cites: Gerontologist. 2011 Dec;51(6):774-8521737398
Cites: Health Econ Policy Law. 2012 Jan;7(1):73-10122221929
PubMed ID
23968671 View in PubMed
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Alternatives to the mental hospital: use of residential facilities for long-term psychiatric care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249724
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1977 Aug;34(8):909-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1977
Author
J A Sylph
H B Kedward
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1977 Aug;34(8):909-12
Date
Aug-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affective Symptoms - therapy
Aged
Delirium, Dementia, Amnestic, Cognitive Disorders - therapy
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Length of Stay
Long-Term Care
Male
Mental Disorders - therapy
Middle Aged
Neurotic Disorders - therapy
Ontario
Personality Disorders - therapy
Residential Facilities
Schizophrenia - therapy
Social Adjustment
Social Behavior Disorders - therapy
Abstract
We examine the use of the mental hospital and alternative residential facilities by 149 chronic psychiatric patients in Ontario. All major movements of patients since the time of first admission were recorded, including the number of episodes and duration of hospitalization and placement in alternative facilities and in the community. Clinical and social variables thought likely to influence use were correlated with duration, placement, and mobility. In spite of the lack of formal criteria for placement, relatively discrete and homogeneous populations were found in each facility and clear patterns of use could be distinguished. For many patients, their present placement represents their most typical setting and implies a particular route through the psychiatric services. We describe factors relating to different types of movements, and emphasize the continuing importance of the mental hospital in long-term psychiatric care.
PubMed ID
407883 View in PubMed
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362 records – page 1 of 37.