Skip header and navigation

2 records – page 1 of 1.

Assessing alcohol use and smoking among patients admitted to the medical ward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271999
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Aug 11;135(14):1251-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-11-2015
Author
John-Kåre Vederhus
Ole Rysstad
Frode Gallefoss
Thomas Clausen
Øistein Kristensen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Aug 11;135(14):1251-5
Date
Aug-11-2015
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcohol-Related Disorders - diagnosis
Educational Status
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medical History Taking - standards
Norway - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The objective of the study was to investigate the incidence of risky alcohol consumption in patients admitted to medical wards, and to examine possible differences in how smoking habits and alcohol consumption are assessed and monitored by health personnel.
The study was conducted on medical wards at Southern Norway Hospital Trust in autumn 2013. Out of 998 patients who were successively admitted, 536 were included in the analysis. A questionnaire was used to survey smoking and risky alcohol consumption, and to determine whether patients could remember being asked and advised about these during their hospitalisation period.
Fifty patients (9.3%) fulfilled the criteria for risky alcohol consumption. A lower percentage reported having been asked about their drinking habits than about their smoking habits (44% versus 62%, p
PubMed ID
26269066 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Diagnosis and type of residence at the time of first consultation at a psychiatric outpatient clinic]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73473
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Jun 20;112(16):2107-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-1992
Author
L J Vatten
A L Børve
Author Affiliation
Universitetet i Trondheim, Institutt for samfunnsmedisinske fag Medisinsk Teknisk Senter.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1992 Jun 20;112(16):2107-11
Date
Jun-20-1992
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Mental Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Neurotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Norway - epidemiology
Outpatient clinics, hospital - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Over a five-year period of registration in the county of S?r-Tr?ndelag we studied whether the frequency of consulting for one of three major psychiatric diagnostic groups (psychosis, neurosis, or "other") depended on the type of municipality (rural, coastal, urban) where the patient was resident. Diagnoses were based on consultations with a staff member of the regional outpatient psychiatric clinic, and the underlying population was described in the National Census, 1980. The results showed that, in general, urban residents sought help more frequently from the psychiatric outpatient clinic than rural residents did, (relative risk = 1.6, 95% confidence interval 1.4 to 1.8). The increased "risk" was attributed to a relatively larger number of neuroses and "other" diagnoses in the urban areas. The risk of consulting for psychosis was higher among coastal residents (relative risk = 1.8, 95% confidence interval 1.4 to 2.3) than among rural residents, was particularly evident among coastal residents between 16 and 39 years of age (relative risk = 4.1, 95% confidence interval 2.1 to 8.5), and was equally strong for men as for women. This study confirms that, in general, the risk of seeking outpatient psychiatric treatment is higher among urban than among rural and coastal residents. The apparently higher frequency of requests to the outpatient clinic for help for psychosis among coastal residents should be balanced against the tendency for city residents with psychosis to be admitted directly to the psychiatric hospital.
PubMed ID
1523635 View in PubMed
Less detail