Skip header and navigation

Refine By

42 records – page 1 of 5.

An Ontario initiative to enhance the effectiveness of AIDS Service Organizations: Community-Linked Evaluation of AIDS Resources.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171019
Source
J Assoc Nurses AIDS Care. 2005 Mar-Apr;16(2):49-52
Publication Type
Article

Charting the NCIC's future: stakeholder support for identified options.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215608
Source
Can J Oncol. 1995 Mar;5(1):314-27
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
F D Ashbury
D C Iverson
P J Shephard
C. Hachey
Author Affiliation
Centre for Behavioural Research and Program Evaluation, NCIC, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
Can J Oncol. 1995 Mar;5(1):314-27
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - organization & administration
Canada
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - prevention & control
Organizational Innovation
Organizational Objectives
Questionnaires
Research - organization & administration
Research Support as Topic - organization & administration
Trustees
Abstract
The National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC) conducted a survey of representatives of its stakeholder populations (members of the cancer research and control communities, past and present NCIC grantees, senior administrators in academic institutions, NCIC governing committee representatives and major partners) to get input on proposals to restructure the NCIC's research programs. The survey results demonstrate support for changes that are likely to significantly alter how the NCIC operates as well as the programs it sponsors. The results suggest support for increasing the percentage of NCIC funds allocated to the Individual Operating Grants area and for changing the NCIC's programs and operating procedures. While there was widespread support for an NCIC-sponsored regional development initiative, many issues remain unresolved, such as what type of cancer research to develop within the provinces.
PubMed ID
8853474 View in PubMed
Less detail

Collaborative efforts are needed to ensure proper knowledge dissemination of telemedicine projects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262976
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Sep;61(9):A4896
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Neel Kolthoff Jakobsen
Lena Sundby Jensen
Lars Kayser
Source
Dan Med J. 2014 Sep;61(9):A4896
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Documentation
Health Communication
Health Services Research - economics - methods - organization & administration
Humans
Information Dissemination
Periodicals as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Research Design
Research Support as Topic - organization & administration
Telemedicine - economics - methods - organization & administration
Abstract
Telemedicine is often seen as the solution to the challenge of providing health care for an increasing number of people with chronic conditions. Projects are often organised locally and based on the involvement of stakeholders with a wide range of backgrounds. It can be challenging to ensure that projects are based on previous experience and that they do not repeat previous studies. To better understand these challenges and current practice, we examined telemedicine projects funded in the 2008-2010 period to explore where, how and to what extent results from the projects were documented and disseminated.
Public and private funds were contacted for information about telemedicine studies focusing on people residing in their homes. After an initial screening of titles and abstracts, 19 projects were identified. The managers of the projects were contacted and information about project results and dissemination were obtained.
More than half of all projects were disseminated to professionals as well as to the public and used two-way communication. However, it was generally difficult to obtain an overview of the projects due to dynamic changes in names and scopes.
We propose that the funding authorities require designs comprising proper evaluation models that will subsequently allow the investigators to publish their findings. Furthermore, a dissemination plan comprising both peers and other professions should be made mandatory. The investigators should ensure proper documentation and dissemination of changes both during and after the projects in order to ensure transparency, and national or international organisations should establish a database with relevant data fields.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
25186538 View in PubMed
Less detail

Complementary and alternative medicine for children--time to enter the evidence-based era.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature163848
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2007;14(2):e103
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Gideon Koren
Author Affiliation
The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2007;14(2):e103
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Complementary Therapies - organization & administration
Congresses as topic
Consumer Product Safety
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Research Design - standards
Research Support as Topic - organization & administration
Abstract
Children receive natural health products and other forms of complementary and alternative medicine that lack evidence of safety and efficacy. The Toronto Hospital for Sick Children has established a national research support program to address this knowledge gap. On May 4, 2007, the Toronto Scientific forum presents cutting edge research in this area.
PubMed ID
17470978 View in PubMed
Less detail

Driving the global public health research agenda forward by promoting the participation of students and new researchers: perspectives from Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153112
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Nov-Dec;99(6):460-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Valéry Ridde
K S Mohindra
Francine LaBossière
Author Affiliation
Centre de Recherche du Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC. valery.ridde@umontreal.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2008 Nov-Dec;99(6):460-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Data Collection
Developing Countries
Health Planning Guidelines
Humans
Needs Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Program Development
Public Health - education
Quebec
Research Personnel - education
Research Support as Topic - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Schools, Public Health - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Teaching
Universities - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Vulnerable Populations
World Health
Abstract
Current trends suggest a movement towards driving forward a global health research agenda in Canada in order to redress global health research inequalities. In this paper, we explore how to promote the participation of students and new researchers in global health in Quebec. To accomplish this, we undertook a study in order to: 1) document the state of teaching and research activities in global health in Quebec and 2) obtain the point of view of various actors on conducting global health research in the Quebec context.
Quantitative and qualitative data were collected through specialized grids and a documentation review (5 major universities), surveys (n=25), individual interviews (n=9), and two convened workshops (n=79).
We identified 27 courses with global health content, 36 researchers in Quebec working primarily on global health issues, and 76 global health research projects implemented over the past 5 years. A number of threats and opportunities were reported with regards to engaging in global health research activities, as were a number of strengths and weaknesses with respect to the teaching and research environments in Quebec.
There appears to be a relatively strong and growing presence of global health in Quebec universities--although the situation varies across institutions--with room for expansion. This trend is partly attributed to an increase in federal funding for and a growing awareness and profile of global health research activities since 2001 and to a growing expertise in global health research in the province. Students and new researchers, however, continue to face multiple challenges requiring special attention and targeted investment. We conclude with a set of recommendations for key stakeholders.
PubMed ID
19149386 View in PubMed
Less detail

42 records – page 1 of 5.