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2012 Pediatric Report: devastating at any age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116028
Source
Bull Am Coll Surg. 2013 Feb;98(2):59-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
Richard J Fantus
Michael L Nance
Author Affiliation
Trauma Services, Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center, Chicago, USA.
Source
Bull Am Coll Surg. 2013 Feb;98(2):59-60
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
General Surgery
Humans
Infant
Pediatrics
Registries
Research Report
Societies, Medical
United States - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - mortality
Young Adult
PubMed ID
23441511 View in PubMed
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Alternatives for skin sensitisation: Hazard identification and potency categorisation: Report from an EPAA/CEFIC LRI/Cosmetics Europe cross sector workshop, ECHA Helsinki, April 23rd and 24th 2015.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275417
Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2015 Nov;73(2):660-6
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Nov-2015
Author
David Basketter
Takao Ashikaga
Silvia Casati
Bruno Hubesch
Joanna Jaworska
Joop de Knecht
Robert Landsiedel
Irene Manou
Annette Mehling
Dirk Petersohn
Emiel Rorije
Laura H Rossi
Winfried Steiling
Silvia Teissier
Andrew Worth
Source
Regul Toxicol Pharmacol. 2015 Nov;73(2):660-6
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Animal Testing Alternatives - methods - trends
Animals
Cosmetics - administration & dosage - pharmacokinetics - toxicity
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - metabolism - pathology
Education - methods - trends
Europe
Finland
Humans
Research Report - trends
Risk Assessment - methods - trends
Skin - drug effects - metabolism - pathology
Abstract
In the two years since the last workshop report, the environment surrounding the prediction of skin sensitisation hazards has experienced major change. Validated non-animal tests are now OECD Test Guidelines. Accordingly, the recent cross sector workshop focused on how to use in vitro data for regulatory decision-making. After a review of general approaches and six case studies, there was broad consensus that a simple, transparent stepwise process involving non-animal methods was an opportunity waiting to be seized. There was also strong feeling the approach should not be so rigidly defined that assay variations/additional tests are locked out. Neither should it preclude more complex integrated approaches being used for other purposes, e.g. potency estimation. All agreed the ultimate goal is a high level of protection of human health. Thus, experience in the population will be the final arbiter of whether toxicological predictions are fit for purpose. Central to this is the reflection that none of the existing animal assays is perfect; the non-animal methods should not be expected to be so either, but by integrated use of methods and all other relevant information, including clinical feedback, we have the opportunity to continue to improve toxicology whilst avoiding animal use.
PubMed ID
26456663 View in PubMed
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Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Website
Keywords
One Health
Arctic Environmental Health
Ocean, Atmosphere, & Weather
Environment
Research Report
Climate
Abstract
An international team of research scientists has created this peer-reviewed website which tracks multiple changes in the arctic environment. The Report Card is organized by NOAA and will be updated annually.
Online Resources
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Benzodiazepine use and quality of sleep in the community-dwelling elderly population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141943
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2010 Sep;14(7):843-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Sarah-Gabrielle Beland
Michel Preville
Marie-France Dubois
Dominique Lorrain
Sebastien Grenier
Philippe Voyer
Guilheme Perodeau
Yola Moride
Author Affiliation
Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, G8B 1S5 Canada. sarah-gabrielle.beland@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Aging Ment Health. 2010 Sep;14(7):843-50
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - physiology - psychology
Benzodiazepines - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Personal Satisfaction
Research Report
Residence Characteristics
Sleep - physiology
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Social Environment
Abstract
About 50% of the elderly population report being dissatisfied with their sleep. Although benzodiazepines are the most prescribed drugs to treat sleep complaints, the effectiveness of their use on the quality of sleep is not well documented.
This study aimed to assess the association between benzodiazepine use and global sleep quality, as well as six components of sleep quality.
Data from the cross-sectional Quebec Survey on Seniors' Health (n = 2798) conducted in 2005-2006 were used. Quality of sleep was self-reported and use of benzodiazepines was assessed during the previous year.
Benzodiazepine users reported poorer quality of sleep than non-users. The association between benzodiazepine use and each of the six quality of sleep components studied were similar except for the daytime dysfunction component.
The results suggest that there is no evidence that using benzodiazepines is associated with better quality of sleep than non-users in the elderly population. Future longitudinal population-based studies are needed to assess improvements in quality of sleep in the elderly associated with the use of benzodiazepines.
PubMed ID
20658372 View in PubMed
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Chamber personnel's use of Nitrox 50 during hyperbaric oxygen treatment: a quality study--research report.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106185
Source
Undersea Hyperb Med. 2013 Sep-Oct;40(5):395-402
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marco B Hansen
Tejs Jansen
Michael B Sifakis
Ole Hyldegaard
Erik C Jansen
Author Affiliation
Hyperbaric Unit, Department of Anesthesia, Centre of Head and Orthopedics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. Marco.Bo.Hansen.02@regionh.dk
Source
Undersea Hyperb Med. 2013 Sep-Oct;40(5):395-402
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Atmosphere Exposure Chambers
Decompression Sickness - prevention & control
Denmark
Feasibility Studies
Female
Health Personnel
Humans
Hyperbaric Oxygenation - methods - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrogen - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - prevention & control
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Oxygen - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Patient care team
Prospective Studies
Research Report
Time Factors
Abstract
We aimed to evaluate the feasibility and safety of using Nitrox 50 as breathing gas during attendance in a multiplace hyperbaric chamber.
Paper logs between Jan.-Dec. 2011 were reviewed to analyze nitrogen gas-loading, actual bottom time, total bottom time and surface interval time. With the use of the Norwegian Diving Tables nitrogen gas-loading was converted to Repetitive Group Letters. Symptoms of decompression sickness and health problems related to hyperbaric exposures were registered at weekly staff meetings. The chamber personnel breathed chamber air or Nitrox 50.
1,207 hyperbaric exposures were distributed to five chamber attendants and technicians, 14 doctors, and six nurses. Nitrox 50 was inhaled on 978 occasions (81.0%). Median nitrogen gas-loading after first pressurization complied with Repetitive Group Letter A (range A-E), second to C (range A-F), third to D (range A-F), fourth to E (range C-H), fifth to F (range C-H), and sixth to E (range B-G). No symptoms of decompression sickness were reported (95% CI 0.00-0.33%).
Breathing Nitrox 50 during repetitive hyperbaric sessions seems to be feasible and safe while meeting high demands in number of treatment sessions and patient flow and with fewer people employed in the hyperbaric unit.
PubMed ID
24224283 View in PubMed
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Childhood bullying as a predictor for becoming a teenage mother in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138796
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2011 Jan;20(1):49-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
  1 document  
Author
Venla Lehti
Andre Sourander
Anat Klomek
Solja Niemelä
Lauri Sillanmäki
Jorma Piha
Kirsti Kumpulainen
Tuula Tamminen
Irma Moilanen
Fredrik Almqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, University of Turku, Itäinen Pitkäkatu 1 / Varia, 20014, Turku, Finland. venla.lehti@utu.fi
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2011 Jan;20(1):49-55
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
240491
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth rate
Bullying - psychology
Child
Crime Victims - psychology - rehabilitation
Family Health
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - prevention & control - psychology
Research Report
Risk factors
Sex Education - organization & administration
Social Support
Violence - prevention & control - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study is to examine the association between bullying behaviour at the age of 8 and becoming a mother under the age of 20. This birth cohort study included 2,867 Finnish girls at baseline in 1989. Register-based follow-up data on births was collected until the end of 2001. Information, both on the main exposure and outcome, was available for 2,507 girls. Both bullies and victims had an increased risk of becoming a teenage mother independent of family-related risk factors. When controlled for childhood psychopathology, however, the association remained significant for bullies (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.1) and bully-victims (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.05-3.2), but not for pure victims. Reports of bullying and victimisation from the girls themselves, their parents and their teachers were all associated with becoming a teenage mother independent of each other. There is a predictive association between being a bully in childhood and becoming a mother in adolescence. It may be useful to target bullies for teenage pregnancy prevention.
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Ment Health. 2011 Aug;14(3):6421764863
PubMed ID
21136277 View in PubMed
Documents

PEER_stage2_10.1007_s00787-010-0147-z.pdf

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Cohorts and consortia conference: a summary report (Banff, Canada, June 17-19, 2009).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138153
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2011 Mar;22(3):463-8
Publication Type
Article
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Paolo Boffetta
Graham A Colditz
John D Potter
Laurence Kolonel
Paula J Robson
Reza Malekzadeh
Daniela Seminara
Ellen L Goode
Keun-Young Yoo
Paul Demers
Richard Gallagher
Ross Prentice
Yutaka Yasui
Kieran O'Doherty
Gloria M Petersen
Cornelia M Ulrich
Ilona Csizmadi
Ernest K Amankwah
Nigel T Brockton
Karen Kopciuk
S Elizabeth McGregor
Linda E Kelemen
Author Affiliation
The Tisch Cancer Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA. paolo.boffetta@i-pri.org
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2011 Mar;22(3):463-8
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Canada
Case-Control Studies
Clinical Trials as Topic - methods
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Humans
Research Report
Risk Assessment - methods
Sample Size
Abstract
Epidemiologic studies have adapted to the genomics era by forming large international consortia to overcome issues of large data volume and small sample size. Whereas both cohort and well-conducted case-control studies can inform disease risk from genetic susceptibility, cohort studies offer the additional advantages of assessing lifestyle and environmental exposure-disease time sequences often over a life course. Consortium involvement poses several logistical and ethical issues to investigators, some of which are unique to cohort studies, including the challenge to harmonize prospectively collected lifestyle and environmental exposures validly across individual studies. An open forum to discuss the opportunities and challenges of large-scale cohorts and their consortia was held in June 2009 in Banff, Canada, and is summarized in this report.
PubMed ID
21203821 View in PubMed
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Designing and reporting case series in plastic surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134767
Source
Plast Reconstr Surg. 2011 Oct;128(4):361e-368e
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Christopher J Coroneos
Teegan A Ignacy
Achilleas Thoma
Author Affiliation
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, the Surgical Outcomes Research Center, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Plast Reconstr Surg. 2011 Oct;128(4):361e-368e
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biomedical Research - standards - trends
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Humans
Male
Ontario
Patient Selection
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Research Report
Surgery, Plastic - standards - trends
Abstract
The case series is the most prevalent type of clinical research in the plastic surgery literature. However, this is a lower level study design in the hierarchy of evidence. The case series is nevertheless a useful hypothesis generator for future studies. These in turn can be tested with more robust study designs such as the randomized controlled trial. Because the case series remains the most common study design used to communicate our new innovations, there is a need to improve its reporting so that readers will know why the study was undertaken, what the results were, and how the results affect patient care. The authors provide a guide to help future investigators improve the conduct and the reporting of their case series.
PubMed ID
21544010 View in PubMed
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Developing a program of research for an applied public health chair in public health education and population intervention research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133812
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2011 Mar;43(1):119-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Marjorie MacDonald
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 2011 Mar;43(1):119-24
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Public Health Professional - organization & administration
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Public Health Nursing - education
Research Report
PubMed ID
21661619 View in PubMed
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Drowning in children: Utstein style reporting and outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258970
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2014 May;58(5):604-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2014
Author
R. Vähätalo
P. Lunetta
K T Olkkola
P K Suominen
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2014 May;58(5):604-10
Date
May-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood Glucose - analysis
Body temperature
Brain Damage, Chronic - epidemiology - etiology
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - utilization
Child
Child, Preschool
Coma - epidemiology - etiology
Drowning - mortality
Emergency Medical Services - utilization
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Glasgow Coma Scale
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Near Drowning - blood - epidemiology - therapy
Patient Discharge
Research Report - standards
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We report the incidence and mortality of paediatric drowning incidents according to 'Utstein Style for Drowning' guidelines.
Retrospective study including all the drowned children under 16 years of age who were hospitalised or died with or without attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) between 1997 and 2007 in the province of Uusimaa, Finland. Survival rates provided at hospital discharge and after 1-year follow-up period are reported.
A total of 58 drowned children were either admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit or died during the study period. The median (interquartile range) age was 5.9 (3.1, 7.8) years. The annual incidence of drowning was 1.9/100,000 and was highest, 2.8/100,000, in children aged between 1 and 4 years. The annual mortality rate was 0.9/100,000. Of all the 58 patients, 14 (24%) died at the scene, 22 (38.1%) before the hospital discharge, and 26 (45%) within the 1 year. The number of non-fatal drownings was 1.2-fold that of fatal drownings. The survival rate of the 26 patients for whom CPR was initiated by emergency medical service (EMS) personnel was 42% at hospital discharge, with the 1-year survival rate being 27%.
The incidence of drowning in children and the survival rate of those children in whom CPR was initiated by EMS personnel was in line with the previously reported. However, the overall mortality rate in drowned children was higher than estimated in previous studies.
PubMed ID
24580104 View in PubMed
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26 records – page 1 of 3.