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Academic practice-policy partnerships for health promotion research: experiences from three research programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259816
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Nov;42(15 Suppl):88-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Charli C-G Eriksson
Ingela Fredriksson
Karin Fröding
Susanna Geidne
Camilla Pettersson
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Nov;42(15 Suppl):88-95
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - psychology
Community-Institutional Relations
Cooperative Behavior
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Program Evaluation
Research Personnel - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The development of knowledge for health promotion requires an effective mechanism for collaboration between academics, practitioners, and policymakers. The challenge is better to understand the dynamic and ever-changing context of the researcher-practitioner-policymaker-community relationship.
The aims were to explore the factors that foster Academic Practice Policy (APP) partnerships, and to systematically and transparently to review three cases.
Three partnerships were included: Power and Commitment-Alcohol and Drug Prevention by Non-Governmental Organizations in Sweden; Healthy City-Social Inclusion, Urban Governance, and Sustainable Welfare Development; and Empowering Families with Teenagers-Ideals and Reality in Karlskoga and Degerfors. The analysis includes searching for evidence for three hypotheses concerning contextual factors in multi-stakeholder collaboration, and the cumulative effects of partnership synergy.
APP partnerships emerge during different phases of research and development. Contextual factors are important; researchers need to be trusted by practitioners and politicians. During planning, it is important to involve the relevant partners. During the implementation phase, time is important. During data collection and capacity building, it is important to have shared objectives for and dialogues about research. Finally, dissemination needs to be integrated into any partnership. The links between process and outcomes in participatory research (PR) can be described by the theory of partnership synergy, which includes consideration of how PR can ensure culturally and logistically appropriate research, enhance recruitment capacity, and generate professional capacity and competence in stakeholder groups. Moreover, there are PR synergies over time.
The fundamentals of a genuine partnership are communication, collaboration, shared visions, and willingness of all stakeholders to learn from one another.
PubMed ID
25416579 View in PubMed
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The care unit in nursing home research: evidence in support of a definition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135283
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2011;11:46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Carole A Estabrooks
Debra G Morgan
Janet E Squires
Anne-Marie Boström
Susan E Slaughter
Greta G Cummings
Peter G Norton
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. carole.estabrooks@ualberta.ca
Source
BMC Med Res Methodol. 2011;11:46
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - psychology
Aged
Alberta
Data Collection - methods
Evidence-Based Nursing
Feasibility Studies
Health Services for the Aged
Humans
Long-Term Care - methods
Manitoba
Models, organizational
Nurses' Aides - psychology
Nursing Care - classification - manpower
Nursing Homes - classification - statistics & numerical data
Nursing Methodology Research
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Research Personnel - psychology
Saskatchewan
Terminology as Topic
Abstract
Defining what constitutes a resident care unit in nursing home research is both a conceptual and practical challenge. The aim of this paper is to provide evidence in support of a definition of care unit in nursing homes by demonstrating: (1) its feasibility for use in data collection, (2) the acceptability of aggregating individual responses to the unit level, and (3) the benefit of including unit level data in explanatory models.
An observational study design was used. Research (project) managers, healthcare aides, care managers, nursing home administrators and directors of care from thirty-six nursing homes in the Canadian prairie provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba provided data for the study. A definition of care unit was developed and applied in data collection and analyses. A debriefing session was held with research managers to investigate their experiences with using the care unit definition. In addition, survey responses from 1258 healthcare aides in 25 of the 36 nursing homes in the study, that had more than one care unit, were analyzed using a multi-level modeling approach. Trained field workers administered the Alberta Context Tool (ACT), a 58-item self-report survey reflecting 10 organizational context concepts, to healthcare aides using computer assisted personal interviews. To assess the appropriateness of obtaining unit level scores, we assessed aggregation statistics (ICC(1), ICC(2), ?², and ?²), and to assess the value of using the definition of unit in explanatory models, we performed multi-level modeling.
In 10 of the 36 nursing homes, the care unit definition developed was used to align the survey data (for analytic purposes) to specific care units as designated by our definition, from that reported by the facility administrator. The aggregation statistics supported aggregating the healthcare aide responses on the ACT to the realigned unit level. Findings from the multi-level modeling further supported unit level aggregation. A significantly higher percentage of variance was explained in the ACT concepts at the unit level compared to the individual and/or nursing home levels.
The statistical results support the use of our definition of care unit in nursing home research in the Canadian prairie provinces. Beyond research convenience however, the results also support the resident unit as an important Clinical Microsystem to which future interventions designed to improve resident quality of care and staff (healthcare aide) worklife should be targeted.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21492456 View in PubMed
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Complementary therapy and cancer: decision making by patients and their physicians setting a research agenda.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183421
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 1999 Oct;38(2):87-92
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
C P Herbert
M. Verhoef
M. White
M. O'Beirne
R. Doll
Author Affiliation
UBC Department of Family Practice, 5804 Fairview Avenue, Vancouver, B.C., Canada V6T 1Z3.
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 1999 Oct;38(2):87-92
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Canada
Communication
Complementary Therapies - standards
Decision Making
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Priorities
Humans
Needs Assessment
Neoplasms - psychology - therapy
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient care team
Patient Participation - psychology
Patient Selection
Physician-Patient Relations
Physicians - psychology
Registries
Research Personnel - psychology
Abstract
An invitational meeting, entitled Complementary and Alternative Therapy: Decision Making by Cancer Patients and Their Physicians, brought together Canadian health care providers and researchers who had expertise in patient-physician communication with those who were knowledgeable about complementary therapy and cancer. The aim was to build on the existing knowledge base in both fields in order to determine the unanswered questions, the most important questions, and what methods can be applied for answering these questions. The interdisciplinary group employed a step-wise collaborative process to develop a suggested research agenda regarding decision making by physicians and their cancer patients regarding complementary therapy. The four themes identified are establishment of a registry for complementary therapy usage for cancer care; communication; outcomes measurement; and models of integration. It is hoped that these themes will be considered worthy of support by funding agencies and worthy of investigation by researchers.
PubMed ID
14528700 View in PubMed
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Conducting a client-focused survey using e-mail.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177619
Source
Comput Inform Nurs. 2004 Mar-Apr;22(2):83-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Catherine Yetter Read
Author Affiliation
William F. Connell School of Nursing at Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA. readca@.edu.
Source
Comput Inform Nurs. 2004 Mar-Apr;22(2):83-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Bias (epidemiology)
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Electronic Mail - standards
Health Surveys
Heterozygote
Humans
Information Dissemination
Internet - standards
Middle Aged
Parents - psychology
Phenylketonurias - genetics - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires - standards
Research Design - standards
Research Personnel - psychology
Time Factors
United States
Abstract
An e-mail listserv was used to recruit participants, administer a survey, send electronic gift certificates, and disseminate the findings of a study of psychological responses to being a carrier of the gene for phenylketonuria, a rare genetic disease. The majority of responses to the call for participants were received within the first 24 hours, and most surveys (n = 83) were returned via e-mail within 5 days. The use of e-mail allowed more opportunities for researcher-participant interaction than Web-based surveys, but the return rate of 51% may reflect concerns about privacy when e-mail addresses are required.
PubMed ID
15520570 View in PubMed
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Consent in critical care trials: a survey of Canadian research ethics boards and critical care researchers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136458
Source
J Crit Care. 2011 Oct;26(5):533.e11-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Mark Duffett
Karen E Burns
Michelle E Kho
François Lauzier
Maureen O Meade
Donald M Arnold
Neill K J Adhikari
François Lamontagne
Deborah J Cook
Author Affiliation
McMaster Children's Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. duffett@hhsc.ca
Source
J Crit Care. 2011 Oct;26(5):533.e11-22
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Critical Care - ethics
Data Collection
Ethics Committees, Research
Humans
Models, Theoretical
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic - ethics
Research Personnel - psychology
Risk assessment
Third-Party Consent - ethics
Abstract
Reliance on third party consent for patients without decision-making capacity presents unique challenges for critical care research. We compared the attitudes and beliefs of Canadian research ethics boards (REBs) and intensive care unit researchers toward the use of various consent models for a low-risk randomized controlled trial.
Self-administered, scenario-based survey.
Sixty-two percent of eligible REBs (n = 83) and 78% of eligible researchers (n = 124) completed the questionnaire. The REBs were less comfortable endorsing alternative consent models when a substitute decision maker was unavailable, including consent provided by (a) the intensivist involved with the trial (2.0% vs 15.3%; P = .014), (b) the intensivist not involved with the trial (10.0% vs 36.7%; P = .001), (c) 2 physicians (the intensivist and another consultant, neither of whom is involved with the trial) (18.0% vs 54.1%; P
PubMed ID
21376518 View in PubMed
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[Danish research within the field of anesthesia and intensive medicine. Problems and visions].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186561
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Jan 20;165(4):332-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-2003
Author
Jørgen Viby Mogensen
Author Affiliation
Afdelingen for Uddannelse, Forskning og Udvikling i Anaestesiologi, afsnit 4231, H:S Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 København ø.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Jan 20;165(4):332-6
Date
Jan-20-2003
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anesthesia
Bibliometrics
Biomedical research
Denmark
Humans
Intensive Care
Motivation
Peer Review, Research
Personnel Selection
Research Personnel - psychology
Abstract
Danish anaesthesiology research has traditionally done well internationally. However, there are signs that the research activity is declining. The aim of this article is both to appraise the status of the development of research in anaesthesiology and to discuss the problems that face Danish anaesthesiology research.
The development of research is assessed from the bibliometric literature based on the number of publications in journals that use a peer review of the articles, the total international exposure, the absolute impact of citations, and finally the proportion of publications cited at least once.
Unlike countries with which we usually compare ourselves, both the total level of research activity and the amount of international exposure of research have been declining in Denmark over the past 10-15 years. However, the quality of the research appears to be improving.
On the background of debates within the speciality--e.g. at various meetings and workshops--the author discusses the reasons for and impact of the declining level of research activity. An account is given for what is being done within the speciality to promote research, and tangible proposals are put forward with a view to promoting research activity further at different levels in the Danish Health Service. Finally, attention is drawn to the three most important challenges facing Danish anaesthesiology research in the coming years, namely the shortage of specialist practitioners, the new medical paradigm shift, and the bibliometric methods used for research evaluation.
PubMed ID
12599796 View in PubMed
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Development of a model for organisation of and cooperation on home-based rehabilitation - an action research project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259209
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2014;36(7):608-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Sissel Steihaug
Jan-W Lippestad
Hanne Isaksen
Anne Werner
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2014;36(7):608-16
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Services Research
Home Care Services - organization & administration
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Models, organizational
Norway
Research Personnel - psychology
Stroke - rehabilitation
Abstract
To use general policy guidelines and staff experience of rehabilitation work in two boroughs in Oslo to develop a model for organisation and cooperation in home-based rehabilitation.
The project was conducted as a collaboration between researchers and employees in the two boroughs. It was a practice-oriented study designed as an action research project combining knowledge generation and improvement of practice. Data were collected at seven meetings, and individual, qualitative interviews with a total of 24 persons were conducted in the period February 2010 to June 2011.
Home-based rehabilitation occurred rarely in the boroughs, and this field received little attention. However, this project provided a broad discussion of rehabilitation involving all parts of the organisation of both boroughs. In the course of the project, researchers and borough staff together developed a model for the organisation of and cooperation on rehabilitation including a coordinating unit assigned the paramount responsibility for the rehabilitation and an interdisciplinary team organising the collaboration on the practical level.
When implementing a model like this in primary health services, we recommend involving several levels and service locations of the borough staff in order to legitimise the model in the organisation.
An increasing number of older people with chronic diseases in the Western world have caused increasing emphasis on rehabilitation in primary health care in patients' homes. This study has elucidated challenging framework conditions for rehabilitation work in two Norwegian boroughs. To reduce municipal challenges we propose a rehabilitation model with a coordinating unit with the paramount responsibility for rehabilitation, and an interdisciplinary team constituting a suitable structure for collaboration.
PubMed ID
23758348 View in PubMed
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Do canadian researchers and the lay public prioritize biomedical research outcomes equally? A choice experiment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116177
Source
Acad Med. 2013 Apr;88(4):519-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Fiona A Miller
Emmanouil Mentzakis
Renata Axler
Pascale Lehoux
Martin French
Jean-Eric Tarride
Walter P Wodchis
Brenda J Wilson
Christopher Longo
Jessica P Bytautas
Barbara Slater
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. fiona.miller@utoronto.ca
Source
Acad Med. 2013 Apr;88(4):519-26
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biomedical Research - organization & administration
Canada
Choice Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Priorities - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Patient Participation - psychology
Public Opinion
Questionnaires
Research Personnel - psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
To quantify and compare the preferences of researchers and laypeople in Canada regarding the outcomes of basic biomedical research.
In autumn 2010, the authors conducted a cross-sectional, national survey of basic biomedical researchers funded by Canada's national health research agency and a representative sample of Canadian citizens to assess preferences for research outcomes across five attributes using a discrete choice experiment. Attributes included advancing scientific knowledge (assessed by published papers); building research capacity (assessed by trainees); informing decisions in the health products industry (assessed by patents); targeting economic, health, or scientific priorities; and cost. The authors reduced a fractional factorial design (18 pairwise choices plus an opt-out option) to three blocks of six. They also computed part worth utilities, differences in predicted probabilities, and willingness-to-pay values using nested logit models.
Of 3,260 potential researchers, 1,749 (53.65% response rate) completed the questionnaire, along with 1,002 citizens. Researchers and citizens prioritized high-quality scientific outcomes (papers, trainees) over other attributes. Both groups disvalued research targeted at economic priorities relative to health priorities. Researchers granted a premium to proposals targeting scientific priorities.
Citizens and researchers fundamentally prioritized the same outcomes for basic biomedical research. Notably, they prioritized traditional scientific outcomes and disvalued the pursuit of economic returns. These findings have implications for how academic medicine assigns incentives and value to basic health research and how biomedical researchers and the public may jointly contribute to setting the future research agenda.
PubMed ID
23425982 View in PubMed
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Doing participatory action research in a racist world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168374
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2006 Aug;28(5):525-40; discussion 561-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Colleen Varcoe
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Vancouver.
Source
West J Nurs Res. 2006 Aug;28(5):525-40; discussion 561-3
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropology, Cultural
Attitude of Health Personnel - ethnology
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Battered Women - psychology
British Columbia
Consumer Participation - methods - psychology
Cultural Diversity
Female
Health services needs and demand
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Nursing Methodology Research - organization & administration
Power (Psychology)
Prejudice
Questionnaires
Research Design
Research Personnel - psychology
Researcher-Subject Relations - psychology
Semantics
Social Dominance
Social Identification
Spouse Abuse - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
This exploration of the racial power dynamics in a participatory action research project with women who had experienced intimate partner violence discusses the challenges inherent in doing participatory action with antiracist intent and offers suggestions for overcoming these challenges. To engage in this type of research, explicit commitment to the goals of an antiracist intent needs to be shared as widely as possible. Fostering such shared commitment demands that the social locations of all involved be interrogated continuously. Such interrogation, however, needs to be prefaced with understanding that individuals are not representative of particular power positions or social identities or locations and with critical attention to how language and social structures shape racism and other forms of dominance. Being inclusive must be understood as complex and the influence of diverse agendas and perspectives acknowledged and taken into account. In the face of such complexity, "success" in research may need redefinition.
PubMed ID
16829636 View in PubMed
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Enhancing Recruitment Using Teleconference and Commitment Contract (ERUTECC): study protocol for a randomised, stepped-wedge cluster trial within the EFFECTS trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300392
Source
Trials. 2018 Jan 08; 19(1):14
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Date
Jan-08-2018
Author
Erik Lundström
Eva Isaksson
Per Wester
Ann-Charlotte Laska
Per Näsman
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Neurology, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, 171 76, Stockholm, Sweden. erik.lundstrom@gmail.com.
Source
Trials. 2018 Jan 08; 19(1):14
Date
Jan-08-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Clinical Trial Protocol
Journal Article
Keywords
Contracts
Fluoxetine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Humans
Multicenter Studies as Topic
Patient Selection
Pragmatic Clinical Trials as Topic
Recovery of Function
Research Personnel - psychology
Sample Size
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Stroke - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Stroke Rehabilitation - adverse effects - methods
Sweden
Telecommunications
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Many randomised controlled trials (RCTs) fail to meet their recruitment goals in time. Trialists are advised to include study recruitment strategies within their trials. EFFECTS is a Swedish, academic-led RCT of fluoxetine for stroke recovery. The trial's primary objective is to investigate whether 20 mg fluoxetine daily compared with placebo for 6 months after an acute stroke improves the patient's functional outcome. The first patient was included on 20 October 2014 and, as of 31 August 2017, EFFECTS has included 810 of planned 1500 individuals. EFFECTS currently has 32 active centres. The primary objective of the ERUTECC (Enhancing Recruitment Using Teleconference and Commitment Contract) study is to investigate whether a structured teleconference re-visit with the study personnel at the centres, accompanied by a commitment contract, can enhance recruitment by 20% at 60 days post intervention, compared with 60 days pre-intervention, in an ongoing RCT.
ERUTECC is a randomised, stepped-wedge cluster trial embedded in EFFECTS. The plan is to start ERUTECC with a running-in period of September 2017. The first intervention is due in October 2017, and the study will continue for 12 months. We are planning to intervene at all active centres in EFFECTS, except the five top recruiting centres (n?=?27). The rationale for not intervening at the top recruiting centres is that we believe they have reached their full potential and the intervention would be too weak for them. The hypothesis of this study is that a structured teleconference re-visit with the study personnel at the centres, accompanied by a commitment contract, can enhance recruitment by 20% 60 days post intervention, compared to 60 days pre-intervention, in an ongoing RCT.
EFFECTS is a large, pragmatic RCT of stroke in Sweden. Results from the embedded ERUTECC study could probably be generalised to high-income Western countries, and is relevant to trial management and could improve trial management in the future. It might also be useful in clinical settings outside the field of stroke.
The ERUTECC study was registered in the Northern Ireland Hub for Trials Methodology Research Studies Within a Trial repository ( SWAT58 ) on 30 April 2017. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT02683213 . Retrospectively registered on 2 February 2016.
PubMed ID
29310679 View in PubMed
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29 records – page 1 of 3.