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Building partnerships between indigenous communities and universities: Lessons learned in HIV/AIDS and substance abuse prevention research

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89856
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2009 Apr;99 Suppl 1:S77-882
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Baldwin, JA
Johnson, JL
Benally, CC
Author Affiliation
Department of Community and Family Health, College of Public Health, University of South Florida, 13 201 Bruce B. Downs, Blvd., MDC 56, Tampa, FL 33 612, USA. jbaldwin@health.usf.edu
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2009 Apr;99 Suppl 1:S77-882
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Services - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Cooperative Behavior
Education, Public Health Professional
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Health Services Research - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Research Personnel - education - supply & distribution
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
United States - epidemiology
Universities - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Many HIV/AIDS and substance abuse prevention studies in American Indian and Alaska Native communities have been directed by academic researchers with little community input. We examined the challenges in conducting HIV/AIDS-related research in American Indian and Alaska Native communities and the benefits of changing the research paradigm to a community-based participatory model. The lessons we learned illustrate that the research process should be a cyclical one with continual involvement by community members. Steps in the process include (1) building and sustaining collaborative relationships, (2) planning the program together, (3) implementing and evaluating the program in culturally acceptable ways, and (4) disseminating research findings from a tribal perspective. These steps can enhance the long-term capacity of the community to conduct HIV/AIDS and substance abuse prevention research.
PubMed ID
19246672 View in PubMed
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Decolonizing strategies for mentoring American Indians and Alaska Natives in HIV and mental health research

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89857
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2009 Apr;99 Suppl 1:S71-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
Walters, KL
Simoni, JM
Author Affiliation
Indigenous Wellness Research Institute, University of Washington School of Social Work, 4101 15th Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98105, USA. kw@u.washington.edu
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 2009 Apr;99 Suppl 1:S71-76
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Education, Public Health Professional
Educational Status
HIV Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Health Services Research - manpower - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - prevention & control
Mentors
Models, Educational
Prejudice
Research Personnel - education - supply & distribution
United States - epidemiology
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) scholars in the fields of mental health and HIV face formidable barriers to scientific success. These include justifiable mistrust of historically oppressive educational systems, educational disparities, role burdens within academe, the devaluation and marginalization of their research interests, and outright discrimination. Research partners can work to dismantle these barriers by embracing indigenous worldviews, engaging in collaborative research partnerships, building research capacity within universities and tribal communities, changing reward systems, and developing mentoring programs. At the individual level, aspiring AIAN scholars must build coalitions, reject internalized colonial messages, and utilize indigenous ethical frames. The creation of a cadre of AIAN researchers is crucial to improving the health of AIAN peoples.
PubMed ID
19246668 View in PubMed
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Strategies and structures for research in general practice in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222343
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care Suppl. 1993;2:13-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
M. Mäkelä
Author Affiliation
National Research and Development Centre for Welfare and Health (STAKES), Helsinki.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care Suppl. 1993;2:13-5
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Family Practice - organization & administration
Finland
Health Services Research
Humans
Patient care team
Research - education - organization & administration
Research Personnel - education - supply & distribution
Research Support as Topic
PubMed ID
8146463 View in PubMed
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