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286 records – page 1 of 29.

Academic practice-policy partnerships for health promotion research: experiences from three research programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259816
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Nov;42(15 Suppl):88-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Charli C-G Eriksson
Ingela Fredriksson
Karin Fröding
Susanna Geidne
Camilla Pettersson
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Nov;42(15 Suppl):88-95
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel - psychology
Community-Institutional Relations
Cooperative Behavior
Health Personnel - psychology
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Services Research - organization & administration
Humans
Program Evaluation
Research Personnel - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
The development of knowledge for health promotion requires an effective mechanism for collaboration between academics, practitioners, and policymakers. The challenge is better to understand the dynamic and ever-changing context of the researcher-practitioner-policymaker-community relationship.
The aims were to explore the factors that foster Academic Practice Policy (APP) partnerships, and to systematically and transparently to review three cases.
Three partnerships were included: Power and Commitment-Alcohol and Drug Prevention by Non-Governmental Organizations in Sweden; Healthy City-Social Inclusion, Urban Governance, and Sustainable Welfare Development; and Empowering Families with Teenagers-Ideals and Reality in Karlskoga and Degerfors. The analysis includes searching for evidence for three hypotheses concerning contextual factors in multi-stakeholder collaboration, and the cumulative effects of partnership synergy.
APP partnerships emerge during different phases of research and development. Contextual factors are important; researchers need to be trusted by practitioners and politicians. During planning, it is important to involve the relevant partners. During the implementation phase, time is important. During data collection and capacity building, it is important to have shared objectives for and dialogues about research. Finally, dissemination needs to be integrated into any partnership. The links between process and outcomes in participatory research (PR) can be described by the theory of partnership synergy, which includes consideration of how PR can ensure culturally and logistically appropriate research, enhance recruitment capacity, and generate professional capacity and competence in stakeholder groups. Moreover, there are PR synergies over time.
The fundamentals of a genuine partnership are communication, collaboration, shared visions, and willingness of all stakeholders to learn from one another.
PubMed ID
25416579 View in PubMed
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Accountability and pediatric physician-researchers: are theoretical models compatible with Canadian lived experience?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130725
Source
Philos Ethics Humanit Med. 2011;6:15
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Christine Czoli
Michael Da Silva
Randi Zlotnik Shaul
Lori d'Agincourt-Canning
Christy Simpson
Katherine Boydell
Natalie Rashkovan
Sharon Vanin
Author Affiliation
The Hospital for Sick Children, c/o Bioethics Department, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8, Canada.
Source
Philos Ethics Humanit Med. 2011;6:15
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Hospitals, Pediatric
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Models, Theoretical
Pediatrics
Physician's Role
Research Personnel - legislation & jurisprudence
Social Responsibility
Abstract
Physician-researchers are bound by professional obligations stemming from both the role of the physician and the role of the researcher. Currently, the dominant models for understanding the relationship between physician-researchers' clinical duties and research duties fit into three categories: the similarity position, the difference position and the middle ground. The law may be said to offer a fourth "model" that is independent from these three categories.These models frame the expectations placed upon physician-researchers by colleagues, regulators, patients and research participants. This paper examines the extent to which the data from semi-structured interviews with 30 physician-researchers at three major pediatric hospitals in Canada reflect these traditional models. It seeks to determine the extent to which existing models align with the described lived experience of the pediatric physician-researchers interviewed.Ultimately, we find that although some physician-researchers make references to something like the weak version of the similarity position, the pediatric-researchers interviewed in this study did not describe their dual roles in a way that tightly mirrors any of the existing theoretical frameworks. We thus conclude that either physician-researchers are in need of better training regarding the nature of the accountability relationships that flow from their dual roles or that models setting out these roles and relationships must be altered to better reflect what we can reasonably expect of physician-researchers in a real-world environment.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21974866 View in PubMed
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Affirmative action needed to give women fair shot at research chairs?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187957
Source
CMAJ. 2002 Oct 15;167(8):910
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2002

[A hantavirus killed an Israeli researcher: hazards while working with wild animals].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258692
Source
Harefuah. 2014 Aug;153(8):443-4, 499
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Eitan Israeli
Source
Harefuah. 2014 Aug;153(8):443-4, 499
Date
Aug-2014
Language
Hebrew
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antiviral agents - therapeutic use
Disease Reservoirs
Disease Vectors
Finland - epidemiology
Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points - methods
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome - mortality - physiopathology - prevention & control - virology
Humans
Mice
Puumala virus - pathogenicity
Rats
Research Personnel
Ribavirin - therapeutic use
Abstract
An Israeli researcher working in Finland with Bank Voles, contracted an infectious viral disease and died. This was a rare event, but it is important to learn about this class of viruses and to be aware of the hazards while working in the field in close contact with wild animals. The virus termed Puumala belongs to the genus Hanta from the Bunyaviridae family. The natural reservoir is rodents, mice, rats and Bank Votes for the Puuamala strain. The disease is termed HFRS (hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome), is prevalent in Asia and Europe, affecting 200,000 people a year, with 5-15% percent mortality (although in Finland mortality rate is 0.1%). The New World strains cause HPS (hemorrhagic pulmonary syndrome) affecting 200 people a year with 40% mortality. Virus is present in all rodents excretions, and route of infection is by aerosols, hand to mucus membranes contamination, by rodents bites and by contaminated food or water. More than 226 work related infections were documented. Treatment with Ribavirin helps in HFRS but not in HPS. The virus is stable in the environment for long periods, and research must be carried out at biosafety level 3. Working outdoors in rodent infested area, should be carried out using protective clothing, gloves, googles and face mask whenever aerosol producing tasks are performed. Both indoor and outdoor, it is important to adhere to self-hygienic procedures, especially hand washing.
PubMed ID
25286630 View in PubMed
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An analysis of specialist and non-specialist user requirements for geographic climate change information.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114159
Source
Appl Ergon. 2013 Nov;44(6):874-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Martin C Maguire
Author Affiliation
Loughborough Design School, Loughborough University, Ashby Road, Loughborough, Leicestershire LE11 3TU, UK. m.c.maguire@lboro.ac.uk
Source
Appl Ergon. 2013 Nov;44(6):874-85
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel
Arctic Regions
Climate change
Congresses as topic
Data Collection
Environmental monitoring
Europe
Faculty
Geographic Information Systems
Government Agencies
Humans
Needs Assessment
Research Personnel
Weather
Abstract
The EU EuroClim project developed a system to monitor and record climate change indicator data based on satellite observations of snow cover, sea ice and glaciers in Northern Europe and the Arctic. It also contained projection data for temperature, rainfall and average wind speed for Europe. These were all stored as data sets in a GIS database for users to download. The process of gathering requirements for a user population including scientists, researchers, policy makers, educationalists and the general public is described. Using an iterative design methodology, a user survey was administered to obtain initial feedback on the system concept followed by panel sessions where users were presented with the system concept and a demonstrator to interact with it. The requirements of both specialist and non-specialist users is summarised together with strategies for the effective communication of geographic climate change information.
PubMed ID
23642475 View in PubMed
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An embodied response: ethics and the nurse researcher.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137403
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2011 Jan;18(1):112-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Anne Clancy
Author Affiliation
Harstad University College, Norway. anne.clancy@hih.no
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2011 Jan;18(1):112-21
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ethics, Nursing
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Moral Obligations
Norway
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations - ethics
Nursing Methodology Research - ethics
Nursing Theory
Philosophy, Nursing
Public Health Nursing - ethics
Questionnaires
Research Design
Research Personnel - ethics
Research Subjects - psychology
Researcher-Subject Relations - ethics
Vulnerable Populations - psychology
Abstract
The aim of this study is to reflect on situational ethics in qualitative research and on a researcher's embodied response to ethical dilemmas. Four narratives are presented. They are excerpts from field notes taken during an observational study on Norwegian public health nursing practice. The stories capture situational ethical challenges the author experienced during her research. The author's reflections on feelings of uncertainty, discomfort and responsibility, and Levinas' philosophy help to illuminate the ethical challenges faced. The study shows that the researcher always participates, to some degree, and is never merely a spectator making solely rational choices. Ethical challenges in field research cannot always be solved, yet must be acknowledged. Feelings of vulnerability are embodied responses that remind us of the primacy of ethics. More so, it is the primacy of ethics that gives rise to feelings of vulnerability and embodied responses.
PubMed ID
21285202 View in PubMed
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[An interesting experience on the use of information and population data bases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126466
Source
Rev Calid Asist. 2012 Sep-Oct;27(5):288-94
Publication Type
Article
Author
J. Expósito
A P Johnson
Author Affiliation
Departamento de Radiología y Medicina Física, Universidad de Granada, Granada, España. jose.exposito.sspa@juntadeandalucia.es
Source
Rev Calid Asist. 2012 Sep-Oct;27(5):288-94
Language
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes
Computer User Training
Confidentiality
Databases, Factual
Health Services Research
Humans
Information Systems - organization & administration
Models, Theoretical
National health programs - organization & administration
Ontario
Publications
Research Personnel
Research Support as Topic
Abstract
In order to support decisions and analyze outcomes, the Spanish Health System has shown a great interest in developing data bases and high quality information systems. Nevertheless the use of these data bases are limited, not very systematized and, some times, their accessibility may be difficult.
We describe in this review the experience in using the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Science (ICES, Ontario, Canada) as an efficient model to improve the usefulness of these data bases.
Under restrictive conditions of confidentiality and privacy, the ICES has the legal capacity to use several population based data bases, for research projects and reports. ICES's functional structure (with an administrative and scientific level) is an interesting framework since it guarantees its independent and economic assessment.
To date, its scientific production has been high in many areas of knowledge and open to those interested, with points of view of many health care professionals (including management), for whom the quality of research is of the ultimate importance, to be able to access these resources.
PubMed ID
22386797 View in PubMed
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286 records – page 1 of 29.