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1952 records – page 1 of 196.

[3-wheeled and 4-wheeled all-terrain vehicles: unstable and dangerous vehicles].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature231636
Source
Can J Public Health. 1989 Jan-Feb;80(1):28-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
A. Delisle
C. Laberge-Nadeau
B. Brown
Source
Can J Public Health. 1989 Jan-Feb;80(1):28-30
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents
Adolescent
Adult
Humans
Male
Motorcycles - standards
Quebec
Research Design
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We present the results of a questionnaire completed by 526 victims of accidents involving three- and four-wheeled all-terrain vehicles. All victims were treated at the emergency departments of 10 regional hospitals in Quebec. In 70% of cases, the vehicles overturned. Two thirds of victims were injured in accidents without collision, typically involving overturns on level ground or hills. We suggest accident reconstruction research as a means of identifying engineering solutions as one element in an injury control approach.
PubMed ID
2702541 View in PubMed
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2006 Ontario Survey on the Prevalence and Control of Hypertension (ON-BP): rationale and design of a community-based cross-sectional survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156763
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):503-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
J George Fodor
Frans H H Leenen
Eftyhia Helis
Penelope Turton
Author Affiliation
University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Canada. gfodor@ottawaheart.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):503-5
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure Determination
Cross-Sectional Studies
Epidemiologic Research Design
Female
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario - epidemiology
Pilot Projects
Population Surveillance - methods
Prevalence
Abstract
The presently available Canadian data, based on direct measurements of blood pressure (BP) from the Canadian Heart Health Surveys, are more than 15 years old. In view of major changes in the demographics and health status of the Ontario population, there is an urgent need to update this information. On the initiative of the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario, the University of Ottawa Heart Institute, jointly with Statistics Canada, designed and implemented a population-based cross-sectional survey of hypertension in the Province of Ontario: the 2006 Ontario Survey on the Prevalence and Control of Hypertension (ON-BP).
To establish the prevalence of hypertension in the Ontario adult population between the ages of 20 and 79 years; to assess the awareness, current status and management of hypertension; and to gather respondent information about sex, age, physical measurements, personal health practices, socioeconomic measures, ethnicity and comorbidities.
The present paper describes the background history and the successive steps undertaken during the implementation of this project.
The authors' experiences from the ON-BP indicate that close co-operation between research scientists, statisticians, governmental and nongovernmental organizations -- in the present case, the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario -- is essential to conduct a successful, large-scale survey of BP distribution.
Notes
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2001 Mar;14(3):241-711281235
Cites: JAMA. 2003 May 14;289(18):2363-912746359
Cites: JAMA. 2003 Jul 9;290(2):199-20612851274
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2004 Apr;17(4):354-6015062890
Cites: J Hypertens. 2004 Jan;22(1):11-915106785
Cites: J Hypertens. 2004 Aug;22(8):1479-8515257169
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2004 Oct;54(507):765-7115469676
Cites: CMAJ. 1992 Jun 1;146(11):1997-20051596849
Cites: Hypertension. 1995 Jul;26(1):60-97607734
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Jul 20;313(7050):1478688776
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 1997 Oct;10(10 Pt 1):1097-1029370379
Cites: Fam Pract. 2006 Feb;23(1):20-716332947
Cites: Pharmacoeconomics. 2006;24(5):425-4116706569
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Mar 3;369(9563):750-617336651
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 1;23(6):467-7317487292
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):561-517534463
Cites: Am J Hypertens. 2008 Mar;21(3):280-318219304
Cites: CMAJ. 2008 May 20;178(11):1441-918490640
PubMed ID
18548149 View in PubMed
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Abdominoperineal extralevator resection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120975
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Sep;59(9):A4366
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Mattias Prytz
Eva Angenete
Eva Haglind
Author Affiliation
Department of surgery, NU-hospital group, S-461 85, Trollhättan, Sweden. mattias.prytz@vgregion.se
Source
Dan Med J. 2012 Sep;59(9):A4366
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen - surgery
Clinical Trials as Topic
Humans
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - etiology
Perineum - surgery
Postoperative Complications - etiology
Quality of Life
Rectal Neoplasms - surgery
Registries
Research Design
Self Report
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
Abdominoperineal resection for distal rectal cancer is associated with a higher recurrence rate and a poorer overall prognosis than anterior resection. In order to improve the outcome, a more extensive procedure - extralevator abdominoperineal resection - has been introduced. There are, however, currently no prospective or registry-based studies on the effect of this new procedure on local recurrence rates.
Abdominoperineal extralevator resection (APER) is a registry-based Swedish study investigating local recurrence rate three years postoperatively in the entire population of Swedish patients who underwent abdominoperineal resection or extralevator abdominoperineal resection in the 2007-2009-period. In addition to local recurrence rates, the study also investigates the functional and quality-of-life-related outcome 3-4 years postoperatively in the entire study population.
Distal rectal cancer is a surgical and oncological challenge. The APER study will be able to compare the two operative techniques (standard abdominoperineal resection or extralevator abdominoperineal resection) in terms of oncological and functional outcome.
not relevant.
The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT01296984.
PubMed ID
22951192 View in PubMed
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Source
IPPF Med Bull. 1969;3(2):4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1969
Source
IPPF Med Bull. 1969;3(2):4
Date
1969
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Induced
Abortion, Therapeutic
Developed Countries
Europe
Family Planning Services
Great Britain
Incidence
Research
Research Design
Abstract
Last month saw the end of the first year of operation of the Abortion Act in Britian, and statistics are now available for the first 10 months, from April 1968, to February 1969. In that time, legal, notified abortions totalled 28,849, of which 20,746 were on the grounds of risk of injury to the physical or mental health of the women. A further 1350 were carried out because of risk to the life of the woman, 1137 because of risk to the physical or mental health of existing children, 965 because of the risk of the woman bearing a physically or mentally handicapped child, and 52 as emergencies to save the life of the woman or prevent grace injury to her health. Another 4599 abortions were carried out for more than 1 of these reasons. An earlier set of statistics, covering the period up to December 1968, showed that 22,256 abortions legally carried out up to then, 13,609 were in National Health Service hospitals and 8601 in other approved hospitals. It is likely that the total number of legal abortions in Britain for the first full year of the Act will be about 34,000. In the years leading up to the introduction of the Abortion Act, the number of abortions carried out in Britain for reasons then legal had been growing steadily, and had reached 7600 in National Health Service hospitals in 1967. An unknown further number of legal abortions had been done in private nursing homes - these cannot be computed because they were not notifiable before the Abortion Act came into force. There are 4 legal abortions for every 100 live births in Britain; this is about 1/2 the figure for Denmark and one tenth that of Czechoslovakia.
PubMed ID
12255617 View in PubMed
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Above all, do no harm: assessing the risk of an adverse reaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194729
Source
West J Med. 2001 May;174(5):325-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
K. Turcotte
P. Raina
V A Moyer
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology University of British Columbia, 4480 Oak St, L-408 Vancouver, BC, Canada V6H 1V4.
Source
West J Med. 2001 May;174(5):325-9
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Case-Control Studies
Causality
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine - adverse effects
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Physician-Patient Relations
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Vaccination - adverse effects
Notes
Cites: J Pediatr. 1983 Jan;102(1):14-86848712
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Mar 23-30;263(12):1641-52308203
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Jul 15;136(2):121-351415136
Cites: Lancet. 1998 Jan 31;351(9099):356-619652634
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1996 Feb 8;334(6):341-88538704
Cites: Dev Biol Stand. 1997;89:109-129272340
Cites: Vaccine. 1998 Jan-Feb;16(2-3):225-319607034
Cites: JAMA. 1994 Jan 5;271(1):37-417903109
PubMed ID
11342510 View in PubMed
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Absolute risk reductions and numbers needed to treat can be obtained from adjusted survival models for time-to-event outcomes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149699
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2010 Jan;63(1):46-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Peter C Austin
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, G1 06, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada. peter.austin@ices.on.ca
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2010 Jan;63(1):46-55
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Heart Failure - drug therapy - mortality
Humans
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Design
Risk Reduction Behavior
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Cox proportional hazards regression models are frequently used to determine the association between exposure and time-to-event outcomes in both randomized controlled trials and in observational cohort studies. The resultant hazard ratio is a relative measure of effect that provides limited clinical information.
A method is described for deriving absolute reductions in the risk of an event occurring within a given duration of follow-up time from a Cox regression model. The associated number needed to treat can be derived from this quantity. The method involves determining the probability of the outcome occurring within the specified duration of follow-up if each subject in the cohort was treated and if each subject was untreated, based on the covariates in the regression model. These probabilities are then averaged across the study population to determine the average probability of the occurrence of an event within a specific duration of follow-up in the population if all subjects were treated and if all subjects were untreated.
Risk differences and numbers needed to treat.
Absolute measures of treatment effect can be derived in prospective studies when Cox regression is used to adjust for possible imbalance in prognostically important baseline covariates.
PubMed ID
19595575 View in PubMed
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Acarbose for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance: facts and interpretations concerning the critical analysis of the STOP-NIDDM Trial data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179962
Source
Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):969-75; discussion 976-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
J-L Chiasson
R G Josse
R. Gomis
M. Hanefeld
A. Karasik
M. Laakso
Author Affiliation
Research Centre, Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal-Hôtel-Dieu, Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, 3850 St. Urbain Street, Rm 8-202, Montreal, Quebec H2W 1T7, Canada. jean.louis.chiasson@umontreal.ca
Source
Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):969-75; discussion 976-7
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acarbose - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - chemistry
Body Weight - drug effects
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Clinical Protocols
Data Collection - ethics - methods
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Double-Blind Method
Eating - physiology
Ethics, Clinical
Fasting - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Intolerance - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Risk Reduction Behavior
Stroke - classification - etiology - prevention & control
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Withholding Treatment - ethics
Abstract
The STOP-NIDDM Trial has shown that acarbose treatment in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance is associated with a significant risk reduction in the development of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular complications. Kaiser and Sawicki have accused the investigators of the STOP-NIDDM Trial of major biases in the conduct of the study, of manipulating the data and of conflict of interest. The aim of this paper is to present data and explanations refuting these allegations. In the STOP-NIDDM Trial, 61 subjects were excluded from the efficacy analysis before unblinding for legitimate reasons: failure to satisfy major entry criteria (n=17) and lack of post-randomisation data (n=44). Blinding and randomisation were carried out by an independent biostatistician. Titration of placebo/acarbose is well described in the protocol and in the study design paper. Of the study population, 9.3% had a fasting plasma glucose of > or =7.0 mmol/l at screening and could have been diabetic according to the new diagnostic criteria. However, even if these subjects are excluded, patients having acarbose treatment still saw a significant risk reduction in the development of diabetes (p=0.0027). The changes in weight are consistent in different publications and are related to different times of follow-up and assessment. Weight change does have an effect on the development of diabetes, but acarbose treatment is still effective even after adjusting for this (p=0.0063). The cardiovascular endpoints were a clearly designated assessment in the original protocol, and only those defined in the protocol and ascertained by the independent Cardiovascular Event Adjudication Committee were used in the analysis. Hypertension was defined according to the most recent diagnostic criteria. The STOP-NIDDM Trial results are scientifically sound and credible. The investigators stand strongly behind these results demonstrating that acarbose treatment is associated with a delay in the development of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular complications in a high-risk population with IGT.
Notes
Comment In: Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):976-715150689
Comment On: Diabetologia. 2004 Mar;47(3):575-8014727025
PubMed ID
15164169 View in PubMed
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Acceptability and profile of the clinical drug trials underway in Finnish university hospitals in the 1990s: applications reviewed by ethics committees.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192044
Source
Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Sep;23(7):415-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2001
Author
T. Keinonen
S. Nieminen
V. Saareks
V. Saano
P. Ylitalo
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Kuopio, Finland. tuija.keinonen@medfiles.fi
Source
Methods Find Exp Clin Pharmacol. 2001 Sep;23(7):415-23
Date
Sep-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Protocols - standards
Clinical Trials Data Monitoring Committees - statistics & numerical data
Clinical Trials as Topic - standards - statistics & numerical data
Ethics Committees, Research - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Hospitals, University - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Informed Consent - statistics & numerical data
Multicenter Studies as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Patient Selection
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Research Design - standards - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
There is scarce information in literature about the decisions made by ethics committees concerning the clinical studies they have reviewed. A retrospective, detailed review of 666 applications, their amendments and the ethics committees' statements was undertaken. All protrocols of clinical studies on medicinal products submitted to and reviewed by the ethics committees of two university hospitals during the years 1992, 1994, 1996 and 1998 were investigated. Most of the studies were international (50%), multicenter (71%), phase III trials (41%) on a new clinical entity, (38%). Validity of the clinical drug study applications was acceptable in more than half of the cases (364; 55%), while 91 (14%) were approved with advisory comments, 153 (23%) had to be amended, 35 (5%) were left pending and 23 (3%) were rejected. Most of the questions pertained to informed consent and the study protcol. In accordance with precious results, our findings support the opinion that the submitted documents need to be improved, especially with regard to informed consent and study protocols, in order to gain better Good Clinical Practice (GCP) compliance. Well-defined, documented operating procedures of the ethics committees would have facilitated the practical issues in the review process.
PubMed ID
11771857 View in PubMed
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Accessing health care utilization databases for health research: a Canadian longitudinal study on aging feasibility study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147705
Source
Can J Aging. 2009 Sep;28(3):287-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Parminder S Raina
Susan A Kirkland
Christina Wolfson
Karen Szala-Meneok
Lauren E Griffith
Homa Keshavarz
Jennifer Uniat
Linda Furlini
Camille L Angus
Geoff Strople
Amélie Pelletier
Author Affiliation
McMaster Evidence-based Practice Center, McMaster University, Canada. praina@mcmaster.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2009 Sep;28(3):287-94
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging
Canada
Databases, Factual
Epidemiologic Research Design
Feasibility Studies
Health Services - utilization
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Medical Record Linkage
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
ABSTRACTOne of the keys to the success of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging (CLSA) will be the leveraging of secondary data sources, particularly health care utilization (HCU) data. To examine the practical, methodological, and ethical aspects of accessing HCU data, one-on-one qualitative interviews were conducted with 53 data stewards and privacy commissioners/ombudsmen from across Canada. Study participants indicated that obtaining permission to access HCU data is generally possible; however, they noted that this will be a complex and lengthy process requiring considerable and meticulous preparatory work to ensure proper documentation and compliance with jurisdictional variations along legislative and policy lines.
PubMed ID
19860983 View in PubMed
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Access, relevance, and control in the research process: lessons from Indian country.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3424
Source
J Aging Health. 2004 Nov;16(5 Suppl):58S-77S
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Spero M Manson
Eva Garroutte
R Turner Goins
Patricia Nez Henderson
Author Affiliation
American Indian and Alaska Native Programs, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Nighthorse Campbell Native Health Building, Mail Stop F800, P.O. Box 6508, Aurora, CO 80045-0508, USA. spero.manson@uchsc.edu
Source
J Aging Health. 2004 Nov;16(5 Suppl):58S-77S
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Communication
Culture
Ethics, Research
Humans
Indians, North American
Long-Term Care - utilization
Physician-Patient Relations
Research Design
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Smoking
United States
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To illustrate successful strategies in working with American Indian (AI) and Alaska Native (AN) communities in aging and health research by emphasizing access, local relevance, and decision-making processes. METHODS: Case examples of health studies involving older AIs (greater than or equal to 50 years) among Eastern Band Cherokee Indians, a federally recognized reservation; the Cherokee Nation, a rural, nonreservation, tribal jurisdictional service area; and Lakota tribal members living in Rapid City, South Dakota. RESULTS: Local review and decision making reflect the unique legal and historical factors underpinning AI sovereignty. Although specific approval procedures vary, there are common expectations across these communities that can be anticipated in conceptualizing, designing, and implementing health research among native elders. CONCLUSIONS: Most investigators are unprepared to address the demands of health research in AI communities. Community-based participatory research in this setting conflicts with investigators' desire for academic freedom and scientific independence. Successful collaboration promises to enhance research efficiencies and move findings more quickly to clinical practice.
PubMed ID
15448287 View in PubMed
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1952 records – page 1 of 196.