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Antimicrobial susceptibility of Swedish, Norwegian and Danish isolates of Clostridium perfringens from poultry, and distribution of tetracycline resistance genes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56590
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2004 Apr 19;99(3-4):251-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-19-2004
Author
A. Johansson
C. Greko
B E Engström
M. Karlsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology, National Veterinary Institute, SE-751 89 Uppsala, Sweden. anders.johansson@sva.se
Source
Vet Microbiol. 2004 Apr 19;99(3-4):251-7
Date
Apr-19-2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Base Sequence
Chickens
Clostridium Infections - microbiology - veterinary
Clostridium perfringens - drug effects - isolation & purification
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
Female
Microbial Sensitivity Tests - veterinary
Molecular Sequence Data
Polymerase Chain Reaction - veterinary
Poultry Diseases - microbiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Tetracycline Resistance - genetics
Turkeys
Abstract
This study was undertaken to determine the in vitro susceptibility of Clostridium perfringens, isolated from poultry to antimicrobials used in poultry production. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of eight antimicrobials, including the ionophoric coccidiostat narasin, was determined for 102 C. perfringens isolates, 58 from Sweden, 24 from Norway and 20 from Denmark. Susceptibility to each antimicrobial compound was determined by broth microdilution. The isolates were obtained from broilers (89), laying hens (9) and turkeys (4), affected by necrotic enteritis (NE) or by C. perfringens associated hepatitis (CPH), and from healthy broilers. All strains, regardless of origin, proved inherently susceptible to ampicillin, narasin, avilamycin, erythromycin and vancomycin. A low frequency of resistance to virginiamycin and bacitracin was also found. Resistance to tetracycline was found in strains isolated in all three countries; Sweden (76%), Denmark (10%) and Norway (29%). In 80% of the tetracycline-resistant isolates, the two resistance genes tetA(P) and tetB(P) were amplified by PCR whereas in 20% only the tetA(P) gene was detected. No tetM gene amplicon was obtained from any of the tetracycline-resistant isolates. The uniform susceptibility to narasin revealed in this study shows that the substance can still be used to control clostridiosis. In this study, C. perfringens also showed a low degree of resistance to most other antimicrobials tested. Despite the small amounts of tetracycline used in poultry, a considerable degree of resistance to tetracycline was found in C. perfringens isolates from Swedish broilers.
PubMed ID
15066727 View in PubMed
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Center for International Climate and Environmental Research: Oslo (CICERO)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288438
Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Center for International Climate and Environmental Research: Oslo (CICERO)
Language
English
Norwegian
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
One Health
Arctic Environmental Health
Ocean, Atmosphere, & Weather
Climate change
Climate
Research
International Cooperation
Public Policy
Abstract
Conducts research and provide reports, information and expert advice about issues related to global climate change and international climate policy with the aim of acquiring knowledge that can help mitigate the climate problem and enhance international climate cooperation.
Online Resources
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Source
The Arctic University of Norway, Department of Community Medicine.
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Source
The Arctic University of Norway, Department of Community Medicine.
Language
English
Norwegian
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Website
Keywords
Governments and Organizations
Norway
Research Personnel
Inuits
Research
Environmental health
Abstract
The Centre for Sami Health Research (CSHR), Sámi dearvvašvuodadutkama guovvdáš, is an independent centre under the Department of Community Medicine at UiT The Arctic University of Norway. The main aim of the CSHR is to enhance knowledge of the health and life of Sami people in Norway.
The emphasis in the CSHR is on interdisciplinary research, mainly population-based studies using quantitative methods. The Population-based Study on Health and Living Conditions – the SAMINOR Study is the most important research project of the centre.
Online Resources
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Consanguinity and recurrence risk of stillbirth and infant death

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58899
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1999 Apr;89(4):517-523
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
  1 website  
Author
Stoltenberg, C
Magnus, P
Skrondal, A
Lie, RT
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Health Sciences, National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway.
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1999 Apr;89(4):517-523
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Birth Certificates
Case-Control Studies
Consanguinity
Female
Fetal Death - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Recurrence
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Survival Analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to estimate the recurrence risk for stillbirth and infant death and compare results for offspring of first-cousin parents with results for offspring of unrelated parents. METHODS: The study population consisted of all single births with a previous sibling born in Norway between 1967 and 1994. Altogether, 629,888 births were to unrelated parents, and 3466 births were to parents who were first cousins. The risk of stillbirth and infant death was estimated for subsequent siblings contingent on parental consanguinity and survival of the previous sibling. RESULTS: For unrelated parents, the risk of early death (stillbirth plus infant death) for the subsequent sibling was 17 of 1000 if the previous child survived and 67 of 1000 if the previous child died before 1 year of age. For parents who were first cousins, the risk of early death for the subsequent sibling was 29 of 1000 if the previous child survived and 116 of 1000 if the previous child died. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of recurrence of stillbirth and infant death is higher for offspring of first-cousin parents compared with offspring of unrelated parents.
PubMed ID
10191794 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Current trends in arctic medical research in the Nordic countries with special reference to Sweden

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature94088
Source
Pages 8-11 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
CURRENT TRENDS IN ARCTIC MEDICAL RESEARCH Current trends in arctic medical research in the Nordic countries with special reference to Sweden H. LINDERHOLM Particularly during the present century, many research workers have been interested in medical problems in the northern parts of
  1 document  
Author
Linderholm, H
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden
Source
Pages 8-11 in R.J. Shephard and S. Itoh, eds. Proceedings of the Third International Symposium on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, 1974.
Date
1976
Language
English
Geographic Location
Denmark
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Arctic medical research
Denmark
Environmental contra-genetic factors
Ethnic minorities
Finland
Greenland
Human adaptability
Iceland
Lapps
Nordic Council for Arctic Medical Reserach (NCAMR)
Nordic countries
Norway
Sweden
Documents
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Errors in gestational age: Evidence of bleeding early in pregnancy

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64126
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1999 Feb;89(2):213-218
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1999
  1 website  
Author
Gjessing, HK
Skjaerven, R
Wilcox, AJ
Author Affiliation
Division for Medical Statistics, University of Bergen, Norway. hakon.gjessing@smis.uib.no
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1999 Feb;89(2):213-218
Date
Feb-1999
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Birth weight
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Menstruation
Normal Distribution
Norway
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This study explored the extent of errors in gestational age as ascertained by last menstrual period. METHODS: More than 1.5 million birth records (covering the years 1967-1994) from the population-based Medical Birth Registry of Norway were used to study variation in gestational age within strata of birthweight. RESULTS: Within 100-g strata of birthweight, it was found that the observed gestational age distribution could be divided into 3 distinct underlying distributions separated by approximately 4 weeks. This pattern was present through all birthweight strata, from 200 g up to 4700 g. In addition, the apparent misclassification causing a gestational age 4 weeks too short was much more common among low-birthweight births than among heavier births. CONCLUSIONS: The separation of the gestational age distributions by intervals of close to 4 weeks suggests that errors in gestational age measurements are caused by factors related to menstrual bleeding. Furthermore, there is evidence for a strong relation between bleeding at the time of the next menstrual period after conception and low birthweight. This conclusion should be approached with caution because of the retrospective nature of the data.
PubMed ID
9949752 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1998 Oct;88(10):1481-1483
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1998
  1 website  
Author
Forsén, L
Bjartveit, K
Bjørndal, A
Edna, TH
Meyer, HE
Schei, B
Author Affiliation
National Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. lisa.forsen@samfunnsmed.uio.no
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1998 Oct;88(10):1481-1483
Date
Oct-1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Hip Fractures - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Population Surveillance
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to examine the reversibility of the effect of smoking on hip fracture incidence rates. METHODS: A 3-year follow-up cohort study was conducted involving 35,767 adults 50 years of age or older. Of these individuals, 421 suffered a hip fracture. RESULTS: Among participants less than 75 years of age, the relative risk (RR) of hip fracture was elevated for ex-smokers, even for those who had quit smoking more than 5 years previously (men: RR = 4.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2, 15.3; women: RR = 1.3, 95% CI = 0.6, 3.0), but was not as high as that for current smokers (men: RR = 5.0, 95% CI = 1.5, 16.9; women: RR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.2, 3.1). CONCLUSIONS: The effect of smoking on risk of hip fracture was not reversed completely 5 years after smoking cessation.
PubMed ID
9772848 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Genetic composition and variation in Saami populations in northern Norway compared with Nordic populations in middle Norway. A study of non-metric skull variants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76744
Source
Pages 218-225 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Arctic Medical Research, Vol. 47: Suppl. 1, pp. 218-225, 1988 GENETIC COMPOSITION AND VARIATION IN SAAMI PC)PULATIONS IN NORTHERN NORWAY COMPARED WITH NORDIC POPULATIONS IN MIDDLE NORWAY A study of non-metric skull variants E. lregren (1) and P.-E. lsberg (2) Institute of Archaeology (1
  1 document  
Author
Iregren, E.
Isberg, P.E.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Archeology
Department of Statistics, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden
Source
Pages 218-225 in H. Linderholm et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 87. Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Umeå, Sweden, 1987. Arctic Medical Research. 1988;47 Supp 1.
Date
1988
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Genetic composition
Mandibular torus
Morphological traits
Non-metric traits
Nordic populations
Odontological research
Saamis (Lapps)
Documents
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The Groningen Activity Restriction Scale for measuring disability: Its utility in international comparisons

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14362
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1994 Aug;84(8):1270-1273
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
  1 website  
Author
Suurmeijer, TP
Doeglas, DM
Moum, T
Briançon, S
Krol, B
R. Sanderman, R
F. Guillemin
A. Bjelle
W J van den Heuvel
Author Affiliation
Northern Centre for Health Care Research, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Source
American Journal of Public Health. 1994 Aug;84(8):1270-1273
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Sweden
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - classification - physiopathology
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Disability Evaluation
Evaluation Studies
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
France
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Netherlands
Norway
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES. The Groningen Activity Restriction Scale (GARS) is a non-disease-specific instrument to measure disability in activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). It was developed in studies of Dutch samples consisting of elderly or chronically ill people. The psychometric properties of the GARS demonstrated in these studies were highly satisfactory. This paper addresses the psychometric properties of the GARS across countries. METHODS. Data of 623 patients with recently diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis from four European countries were analyzed by means of a principal components analysis and a Mokken scale analysis for polychotomous items. RESULTS. The results of the analyses were highly satisfactory: there was one strong and reliable general factor representing one underlying dimension of disability in ADL and IADL, and there was a clear hierarchical ordering of the items included in the GARS. The validity of the GARS was strongly suggested by the pattern of associations of the GARS with age, sex, and other existing health status measures. CONCLUSIONS. The psychometric characteristics of the GARS, which measures disability in ADL and IADL simultaneously, make this instrument very useful for comparative research across countries.
PubMed ID
8059884 View in PubMed
Online Resources
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Publication Type
Database
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
University of Troms? Library
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Database
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Publications
Other Publications Databases
Research
Arctic Regions
Databases
Factual
Abstract
High North Research Documents is developed and run by the University of Tromso¸ Library. The service gives everybody free access to research documents where the content is of relevance to the high north. The database includes documents of relevance to the high north, within any subject area, written by scholars anywhere in the world. The service thus includes documents in many different languages, though primarily in English.
Online Resources
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22 records – page 1 of 3.