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Adaptation and psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the Good Nursing Care Scale for Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71271
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Sep;17(3):308-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Lisbeth Rehnström
Lennart Christensson
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Mitra Unosson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Care, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Sep;17(3):308-14
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Care - psychology - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research - methods - standards
Patient satisfaction
Perioperative Nursing - standards
Psychometrics
Quality of Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Surgical Procedures, Operative - nursing - psychology
Sweden
Translating
Abstract
The aim of this study was to adapt the instrument 'Good Nursing Care Scale for Patients' to Swedish conditions as a measure of patients' satisfaction, as well as estimating its reliability and validity. Following a pilot test, discussions in the author group, testing for readability among patients and judgement of content validity by a panel of experts, the final version was reduced to 72 items focusing on good caring. The refined instrument was assessed for internal consistency in 447 surgical in-patients, for 2 week test-retest reliability in 100 patients and subjected to orthogonal principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation, followed by second-order factor analysis. The internal consistency item-item correlation coefficient ranged from 0.15 to 0.91, correlation between each item and the total scale was >or=0.30 for 70 items, Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the final scale was 0.79 and test-retest reliability was 0.75. An orthogonal principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation was conducted on the final 71 items and the 15 first-order factors with eigenvalues >or=1 explained 66% of the total variance. A second-order factor analysis of these 15 factors as items resulted in a seven-factor solution. The total variance explained by the seven factors was 79%. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the seven factors ranged between 0.32 and 0.95. The instrument seems reliable and valid to assess the patients' satisfaction with what happened during their hospital stay. To confirm the factor structure and improve factor consistency additional development and testing is suggested.
PubMed ID
12919467 View in PubMed
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Adrenaline in out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation. Does it make any difference?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11388
Source
Resuscitation. 1995 Jun;29(3):195-201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1995
Author
J. Herlitz
L. Ekström
B. Wennerblom
A. Axelsson
A. Bång
S. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Resuscitation. 1995 Jun;29(3):195-201
Date
Jun-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Emergencies
Emergency medical services
Epinephrine - therapeutic use
Female
Heart Arrest - drug therapy - mortality - therapy
Humans
Male
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Fibrillation - drug therapy - mortality - therapy
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A large proportion of cardiac arrests outside hospital are caused by ventricular fibrillation. Although it is frequently used, the exact role of treatment with adrenaline in these patients remains to be determined. AIM: To describe the proportion of patients with witnessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrest found in ventricular fibrillation who survived and were discharged from hospital in relation to whether they were treated with adrenaline prior to hospital admission. PATIENTS AND TREATMENT: All the patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest found in ventricular fibrillation in Göteborg between 1981 and 1992 in whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was initiated by our emergency medical service (EMS). During the observation period, some of the EMS staff were authorized to give medication and some were not. RESULTS: In all, 1360 patients were found in ventricular fibrillation and detailed information was available in 1203 cases (88%). Adrenaline was given in 417 cases (35%). Among patients with sustained ventricular fibrillation, those who received adrenaline experienced the return of spontaneous circulation more frequently (P
PubMed ID
7667549 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of trained Swedish lay rescuers toward CPR performance in an emergency. A survey of 1012 recently trained CPR rescuers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72217
Source
Resuscitation. 2000 Mar;44(1):27-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
A. Axelsson
A. Thorén
S. Holmberg
J. Herlitz
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Röda Srâket 4, SE-413 45, Göteborg, Sweden. asa.axelsson@alfa.telenordia.se
Source
Resuscitation. 2000 Mar;44(1):27-36
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - education
Consumer Participation
Data Collection
Emergencies
Female
Health Education - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Professional Competence
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sweden
Abstract
59 years old. Only 1% had attended the course because of their own or a relative's cardiac disease. Ninety-four per cent believed there was a minor to major risk of serious disease transmission while performing CPR. When predicting their willingness to perform CPR in six scenarios, 17% would not start CPR on a young drug addict, 7% would not perform CPR on an unkempt man, while 97% were sure about starting CPR on a relative and 91% on a known person. In four of six scenarios, respondents from rural areas were significantly more positive than respondents from metropolitan areas about starting CPR. In conclusion, readiness to perform CPR on a known person is high among trained CPR rescuers, while hesitation about performing CPR on a stranger is evident. Respondents from rural areas are more frequently positive about starting CPR than those from metropolitan areas.
PubMed ID
10699697 View in PubMed
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Biological and physiological knowledge and skills of graduating Finnish nursing students to practice in intensive care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180383
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2004 May;24(4):293-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Riitta-Liisa Aäri
Marita Ritmala-Castrén
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Tarja Suominen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. riitta-liisa.aari@utu.fi
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2004 May;24(4):293-300
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biology - education
Clinical Competence - standards
Curriculum - standards
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - standards
Educational Measurement
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Intensive Care - standards
Knowledge
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nursing Education Research
Physiology - education
Questionnaires
Students, Nursing - psychology
Abstract
This study describes the basic biological and physiological knowledge and skills of graduating nurse students in Finland against the requirement of their being able to practice safely and effectively in intensive care. The study describes also their interest and willingness to work in intensive care. Measurements were based on the Basic Knowledge Assessment Tool (BKAT-5) developed by Toth in the United States. The sample consisted of 130 nursing students graduating in December 2001 and January 2002. The data were analysed statistically. The students were most knowledgeable in the areas of appropriate precautions, living will and medical calculation, followed by neurology and endocrinology. Scores were poorest for pulmonary, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular knowledge. Intensive care studies and the desire to work in intensive care correlated significantly with the respondents' basic intensive care knowledge. It is important for nursing education to concentrate on developing those areas of intensive care studies where the performance of students is weakest.
PubMed ID
15110439 View in PubMed
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Bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation out-of-hospital. A first description of the bystanders and their experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7779
Source
Resuscitation. 1996 Nov;33(1):3-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1996
Author
A. Axelsson
J. Herlitz
L. Ekström
S. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Resuscitation. 1996 Nov;33(1):3-11
Date
Nov-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - psychology
Female
First Aid - psychology
Heart Arrest - epidemiology - therapy
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
At present there are about 1 million trained cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) rescuers in Sweden. CPR out-of-hospital is initiated about 2000 times a year in Sweden. However, very little is known about the bystanders' experiences and reactions. The aim of this study was to describe bystander-initiated CPR, the circumstances, the bystander and his experiences. All CPR bystanders in Sweden who reported their resuscitation attempts between 1990 and 1994 were approached with a phone interview and a postal questionnaire, resulting in 742 questionnaires. Bystander-initiated CPR most frequently took place in public places such as the street. The rescuer most frequently had problems with mouth-to-mouth ventilation (20%) and vomiting (18%). More than half (53%) of the rescuers experienced CPR without problems. Ninety-two percent of the bystanders had no hesitation because of fear of contracting the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) virus. Ninety-three percent of the rescuers regarded their intervention as a mainly positive experience. Of 425 interviewed rescuers, 99.5% were prepared to start CPR again.
PubMed ID
8959767 View in PubMed
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Can we define patients with no chance of survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53280
Source
Heart. 2004 Oct;90(10):1114-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
J. Herlitz
J. Engdahl
L. Svensson
M. Young
K-A Angquist
S. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, S-413 45 Göteborg Sweden. johan.herlitz@hjl.gu.se
Source
Heart. 2004 Oct;90(10):1114-8
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advanced Cardiac Life Support
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Emergency medical services
Female
Heart Arrest - mortality - therapy
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Patient Selection
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Rate
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether subgroups of patients with no chance of survival can be defined among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. PATIENTS: Patients in the Swedish cardiac arrest registry who fulfilled the following criteria were surveyed: cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) was attempted; the arrest was not crew witnessed; and patients were found in a non-shockable rhythm. SETTING: Various ambulance organisations in Sweden. DESIGN: Prospective observational study. RESULTS: Among the 16,712 patients who fulfilled the inclusion criteria, the following factors were independently associated with a lower chance of survival one month after cardiac arrest: no bystander CPR; non-witnessed cardiac arrest; cardiac arrest occurring at home; increasing interval between call for and arrival of the ambulance; and increasing age. When these factors were considered simultaneously two groups with no survivors were defined. In both groups patients were found in a non-shockable rhythm, no bystander CPR was attempted, the arrest was non-witnessed, the arrest took place at home. In one group the interval between call for and arrival of ambulance exceeded 12 minutes. In the other group patients were older than 80 years and the interval between call for and arrival of the ambulance exceeded eight minutes. CONCLUSION: Among patients who had an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and were found in a non-shockable rhythm the following factors were associated with a low chance of survival: no bystander CPR, non-witnessed cardiac arrest, the arrest took place at home, increasing interval between call for and arrival of ambulance, and increasing age. When these factors were considered simultaneously, groups with no survivors could be defined. In such groups the ambulance crew may refrain from starting CPR.
Notes
Comment In: Heart. 2004 Oct;90(10):1107-915367499
PubMed ID
15367502 View in PubMed
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Causes of death in patients presenting to hospital with symptoms suggestive of acute myocardial infarction: a one-year follow-up study with autopsy results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54938
Source
Coron Artery Dis. 1994 Jan;5(1):51-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1994
Author
J. Herlitz
B W Karlson
A. Hjalmarson
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Coron Artery Dis. 1994 Jan;5(1):51-60
Date
Jan-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Autopsy
Cause of Death
Chest Pain - etiology
Coronary Care Units
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction - mortality - pathology
Patient Discharge
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: About 20% of patients admitted to a medical emergency room have chest pain or other symptoms raising suspicion of acute myocardial infarction. AIM: To describe the place and mode of death in such patients during 1 year of follow-up. PATIENTS: All patients (n = 5362) admitted to a single hospital during 21 months because of such symptoms. RESULTS: In all, 565 patients (11%) died. Death rate was directly related to the initial degree of suspicion of acute myocardial infarction. Of these patients, 196 (35%) died during initial hospitalization and only 89 (16%) died outside the hospital. The overall autopsy rate was 53%. Of the deaths that occurred during initial hospitalization, the majority were judged as cardiac, most being due to acute myocardial infarction, particularly if the patients died in the coronary care unit. Among patients who died after discharge from hospital, non-cardiac factors contributed more substantially to death, particularly in patients who died during rehospitalization. The cause of death was not established in a high proportion of patients who died outside hospital. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that, among patients admitted to the emergency room because of suspected acute myocardial infarction, causes of death other than a documented cardiac event become increasingly important when the interval between admittance to the emergency room and death increases.
PubMed ID
8136932 View in PubMed
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Changes in the use of medications after acute myocardial infarction: possible impact on mortality after myocardial infarction and long-term outcome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53970
Source
Coron Artery Dis. 2001 Feb;12(1):61-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
J. Herlitz
M. Dellborg
B W Karlson
J. Lindqvist
T. Karlsson
W. Sandén
M. Sjölin
H. Wedel
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Coron Artery Dis. 2001 Feb;12(1):61-7
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aspirin - therapeutic use
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy - mortality
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the change in the use of medication after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and discuss its possible impact on risk and risk indicators for death. PATIENTS: All patients discharged alive after hospitalization for AMI at Sahlgrenska Hospital (covering half the community of Göteborg, i.e. 250,000 of 500,000 inhabitants) during 1986-1987 (period I) and at Sahlgrenska Hospital and Ostra Hospital (covering the whole community of Göteborg, 500,000 inhabitants) during 1990-1991 (period II). METHODS: Overall mortality was retrospectively evaluated during 5 years of follow-up. RESULTS: In all, 740 patients were included in the study during period I and 1448 during period II. The 5-year mortalities were 44.1% for period I patients and 39.3% for period II patients (P = 0.036). The relative risk of death for period II patients was 0.78 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.67-0.89, P = 0.0005] after adjustment for differences at baseline. There was a significant interaction with a history of congestive heart failure; improvement in duration of survival was found only for patients without such a history. During period I, only 3% of patients were administered fibrinolytic agents, compared with 33% of patients during period II (P
PubMed ID
11211167 View in PubMed
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Characteristics and outcome among patients having out of hospital cardiac arrest at home compared with elsewhere.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31287
Source
Heart. 2002 Dec;88(6):579-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
J. Herlitz
M. Eek
M. Holmberg
J. Engdahl
S. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. johan.herlitz@hjl.gu.se
Source
Heart. 2002 Dec;88(6):579-82
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - methods
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Female
Heart Arrest - mortality - therapy
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prognosis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics and outcome of patients who have a cardiac arrest at home compared with elsewhere out of hospital. PATIENTS: Subjects were patients included in the Swedish cardiac arrest registry between 1990 and 1999. The registry covers about 60% of all ambulance organisations in Sweden. METHODS: The study sample comprised patients reached by the ambulance crew and in whom resuscitation was attempted out of hospital. There was no age limit. Crew witnessed cases were excluded. The patients were divided into two groups: cardiac arrest at home and cardiac arrest elsewhere. RESULTS: Among a study population of 24 630 patients the event took place at home in 16 150 (65.5%). Those in whom the arrest took place at home differed from the remainder in that they were older, were more often women, less often had a witnessed cardiac arrest, were less often exposed to bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), were less often found in ventricular fibrillation, and had a longer interval between collapse and call for ambulance, arrival of ambulance, start of CPR, and first defibrillation. Of patients in whom the arrest took place at home, 11.3% were admitted to hospital alive, v 19.4% in the elsewhere group (p
PubMed ID
12433883 View in PubMed
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Characteristics and outcome among patients suffering in-hospital cardiac arrest in monitored and non-monitored areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32112
Source
Resuscitation. 2001 Feb;48(2):125-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
J. Herlitz
A. Bång
S. Aune
L. Ekström
G. Lundström
S. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. johan.herlitz@hjl.gu.se
Source
Resuscitation. 2001 Feb;48(2):125-35
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - methods - mortality
Cause of Death
Child
Comparative Study
Female
Heart Arrest - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - complications - epidemiology - therapy
Probability
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
AIM: To describe the characteristics and outcome among patients suffering in-hospital cardiac arrest in relation to whether the arrest took place in a ward with monitoring facilities. METHODS: All patients who suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest during a 4-year period in Sahlgrenska Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden and in whom resuscitative efforts were attempted, were prospectively recorded and described in terms of characteristics and outcome. RESULTS: Among 557 patients, 292 (53%) had a cardiac arrest in wards with monitoring facilities. Those in a monitored location more frequently had a confirmed or possible acute myocardial infarction (AMI) as judged to be the cause of arrest (P
PubMed ID
11426474 View in PubMed
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136 records – page 1 of 14.