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Adaptation and psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the Good Nursing Care Scale for Patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71271
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Sep;17(3):308-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Lisbeth Rehnström
Lennart Christensson
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Mitra Unosson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Care, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2003 Sep;17(3):308-14
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analysis of Variance
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Care - psychology - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research - methods - standards
Patient satisfaction
Perioperative Nursing - standards
Psychometrics
Quality of Health Care
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Surgical Procedures, Operative - nursing - psychology
Sweden
Translating
Abstract
The aim of this study was to adapt the instrument 'Good Nursing Care Scale for Patients' to Swedish conditions as a measure of patients' satisfaction, as well as estimating its reliability and validity. Following a pilot test, discussions in the author group, testing for readability among patients and judgement of content validity by a panel of experts, the final version was reduced to 72 items focusing on good caring. The refined instrument was assessed for internal consistency in 447 surgical in-patients, for 2 week test-retest reliability in 100 patients and subjected to orthogonal principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation, followed by second-order factor analysis. The internal consistency item-item correlation coefficient ranged from 0.15 to 0.91, correlation between each item and the total scale was >or=0.30 for 70 items, Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the final scale was 0.79 and test-retest reliability was 0.75. An orthogonal principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation was conducted on the final 71 items and the 15 first-order factors with eigenvalues >or=1 explained 66% of the total variance. A second-order factor analysis of these 15 factors as items resulted in a seven-factor solution. The total variance explained by the seven factors was 79%. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the seven factors ranged between 0.32 and 0.95. The instrument seems reliable and valid to assess the patients' satisfaction with what happened during their hospital stay. To confirm the factor structure and improve factor consistency additional development and testing is suggested.
PubMed ID
12919467 View in PubMed
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Biological and physiological knowledge and skills of graduating Finnish nursing students to practice in intensive care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180383
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2004 May;24(4):293-300
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Author
Riitta-Liisa Aäri
Marita Ritmala-Castrén
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Tarja Suominen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. riitta-liisa.aari@utu.fi
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2004 May;24(4):293-300
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biology - education
Clinical Competence - standards
Curriculum - standards
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - standards
Educational Measurement
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Intensive Care - standards
Knowledge
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nursing Education Research
Physiology - education
Questionnaires
Students, Nursing - psychology
Abstract
This study describes the basic biological and physiological knowledge and skills of graduating nurse students in Finland against the requirement of their being able to practice safely and effectively in intensive care. The study describes also their interest and willingness to work in intensive care. Measurements were based on the Basic Knowledge Assessment Tool (BKAT-5) developed by Toth in the United States. The sample consisted of 130 nursing students graduating in December 2001 and January 2002. The data were analysed statistically. The students were most knowledgeable in the areas of appropriate precautions, living will and medical calculation, followed by neurology and endocrinology. Scores were poorest for pulmonary, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular knowledge. Intensive care studies and the desire to work in intensive care correlated significantly with the respondents' basic intensive care knowledge. It is important for nursing education to concentrate on developing those areas of intensive care studies where the performance of students is weakest.
PubMed ID
15110439 View in PubMed
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Children in the hospital: elements of quality in drawings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162326
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2007 Aug;22(4):333-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
Tiina Pelander
Kimmo Lehtonen
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. tiina.pelander@utu.fi
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2007 Aug;22(4):333-41
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Art
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Psychology
Child, Hospitalized - psychology
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Health Facility Environment
Health services needs and demand
Hospitals, University
Humans
Interior Design and Furnishings
Male
Nursing Methodology Research
Parents - psychology
Personnel, Hospital - psychology
Play and Playthings
Quality of Health Care - organization & administration
Smiling - psychology
Abstract
Not much is known about how children perceive the quality of care that they receive in hospitals. This study set out to describe elements of quality in children's drawings of an ideal hospital. Thirty-five drawings were collected from children aged between 4 and 11 years during their stay in a university hospital in Finland. They were coded using the method of content analysis. The two main categories extracted from the analysis were the environment and the people of their ideal hospital. The emphasis was on the environment; patients, parents, and nurses appeared less frequently in the drawings. The findings showed that children are capable of offering valuable insights into the elements of quality through the medium of drawing.
PubMed ID
17645961 View in PubMed
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Comparison of competence assessments made by nurse managers and practising nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182608
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Nov;11(6):404-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2003
Author
Riitta Meretoja
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
Nursing Director, Corporate Headquarters, Hospital District of Helsinki and Uusimaa Professor, Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Finland. rita.meretoja@hus.fi
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2003 Nov;11(6):404-9
Date
Nov-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Employee Performance Appraisal - standards
Finland
Hospitals, University
Humans
Linear Models
Middle Aged
Nurse Administrators - education - psychology
Nurse's Role
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - psychology - standards
Nursing, Supervisory
Questionnaires
Self Efficacy
Abstract
This study compares nurse and manager assessments of nurse competence in a university hospital setting. Although managers carry out annual reviews, few studies have examined the agreement between the competence assessments made by practising nurses and their managers. Using a pretested 73-item questionnaire, consisting of seven competence categories, we compared self-assessments and manager assessments of the level of nurse competence on a Visual Analogue Scale of 0-100 and the frequency of using competencies by using statistical analyses. Managers assessed the overall level of competence (70.8 +/- 19.3 vs. 63.9 +/- 13.7) (mean +/- SD) and the level of competence in five competence categories significantly higher than the nurses themselves. A high degree of agreement was found between the assessments for the frequency of using competencies. These results can be used to encourage nurses and to improve the quality of care in different hospital work environments.
PubMed ID
14641722 View in PubMed
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Comparison of nurse competence in different hospital work environments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178798
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2004 Sep;12(5):329-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Riitta Meretoja
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Anna-Maija Kaira
Author Affiliation
Corporate Headquarters, Hospital District of Helsinki and Uusimaa, Vironkatu 12 B 24, Fin-00170 Helsinki, Finland. ritta.meretoja@hus.fi
Source
J Nurs Manag. 2004 Sep;12(5):329-36
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care - standards
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Critical Care - standards
Emergency Nursing - education - standards
Finland
Health Facility Environment - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Hospital Units
Hospitals, University
Humans
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Nurse's Role
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - education - organization & administration - psychology
Operating Room Nursing - education - standards
Questionnaires
Self-Assessment
Abstract
This study examines nurses' perceptions of competence in different university hospital work environments.
Nurses' self-recognition of own level of competence is essential in maintaining high standards of care. The demands for nurse competence may vary between work environments. However, there are very few studies that compare nurse competence in different hospital work environments.
We analysed self-assessments of competence of 593 Registered Nurses working in wards, emergency/outpatient or intensive care units or in operation rooms. The instrument used was a pretested 73-item questionnaire consisting of seven competence categories. The level of competence was assessed on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scale of 0-100 and the frequency of using items of competencies in clinical practice was assessed on a four-point scale.
Nurses reported their overall level of competence as good. They felt most competent in the categories of Managing situations, Diagnostic functions and Helping role (VAS-means 68-69), and least competent in Ensuring quality category (VAS-mean 56). Operation room nurses compared with other nurses reported lower level of competence and lower frequency of using items of competencies in several competence categories. In general, the self-assessed level of competence was greater the higher the frequency of using of competencies. Correlations between both age and length of work experience and the self-assessed overall level of competence were positive.
Nurse competence profiles differed in both the level of and in frequency of using competencies between work environments. Context-specific knowledge of nurse competence from real work life situations provides direction on how to structure work environments and staff development interventions to provide qualified care.
PubMed ID
15315489 View in PubMed
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The competence of student nurse teachers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147017
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2009;6:Article35
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Leena Kaarina Salminen
Hanna-Leena Melender
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
University of Turku. leesalmi@utu.fi
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2009;6:Article35
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Education, Nursing, Graduate - standards
Educational Measurement
Faculty, Nursing - standards
Feedback, Psychological
Finland
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Peer Group
Personality
Professional Competence - standards
Questionnaires
Self-Assessment
Statistics, nonparametric
Students, Nursing - psychology
Teaching - standards
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate how student nurse teachers meet the requirements of nurse teachers as they practice teaching in nurse education. The data was collected by the Evaluation of Requirements of Nurse Teachers (ERNT), as self-evaluations and peer evaluations answered by 40 student teachers over three years. The response rate was 82%. The total number of completed questionnaires received was 143. Data was analyzed by using descriptive statistics. The student teachers gained a high level of competence as teachers. The highest level of competence was reported in relationships with students, while the lowest level was associated with teaching skills. Of the single requirements, the weakest skills were related to teaching decision-making and encouraging students constantly to seek new knowledge. The nursing competence was mainly evaluated with high-level scores. Evaluations by the student teachers themselves and their peer students were in line.
PubMed ID
19954420 View in PubMed
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Continuity of care in ambulatory surgery critical pathways: the patients' perceptions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149766
Source
Medsurg Nurs. 2009 May-Jun;18(3):169-73
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marja Renholm
Tarja Suominen
Ann-Marie Turtiainen
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Medsurg Nurs. 2009 May-Jun;18(3):169-73
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aftercare - psychology
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures - nursing - psychology
Attitude to Health
Continuity of Patient Care - organization & administration
Critical Pathways - organization & administration
Female
Finland
Humans
Inpatients - psychology
Internal-External Control
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Nursing Methodology Research
Patient-Centered Care - organization & administration
Perioperative Care - psychology
Preoperative Care - psychology
Professional-Patient Relations
Quality of Health Care
Questionnaires
Time and Motion Studies
Abstract
This study dealt with patients' experiences of the continuity of care through an ambulatory surgical critical pathway. Data were collected from theme interviews conducted with surgical patients 25 days after their procedures. Important factors in continuity of care were defined as time flow, coordination flow, caring relationship flow, and information flow.
PubMed ID
19591363 View in PubMed
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The development of moral judgment during nursing education in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178087
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Oct;24(7):538-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Jaana Auvinen
Tarja Suominen
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Klaus Helkama
Author Affiliation
Yliopistonkatu 7 C 30, 20100 Turku, Finland. jaana.auvien@kaarina.fi
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2004 Oct;24(7):538-46
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum - standards
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate - ethics - methods - standards
Ethics, Nursing - education
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Judgment - ethics
Male
Moral Development
Nursing Education Research
Nursing Methodology Research
Professional Competence - standards
Questionnaires
Students, Nursing - psychology
Teaching - methods - standards
Abstract
This study describes moral judgment among first- and last-year nursing students in Finland and examines the effects of ethics teaching on the development of moral judgment. The data for this quantitative cross-sectional study were collected using the Defining Issues Test (DIT), which is based on Kohlberg's theory of moral reasoning stages. The questionnaires were sent to four polytechnics, which offer nursing education in southern Finland. A total of 52 first-year students and 54 last-year students participated. The results showed that students who had had to deal with ethical dilemmas in their practical training had higher moral judgment than students who did not. Last-year students had higher moral judgment than first-year students. Last-year students resorted to principle-based thinking more often than first-year students in resolving DIT dilemmas. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant. The results indicate that nursing education may has an effect upon students' moral judgment.
PubMed ID
15465169 View in PubMed
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Dignity realization of patients with stroke in hospital care: A grounded theory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300228
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2019 Mar; 26(2):378-389
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Sunna Rannikko
Minna Stolt
Riitta Suhonen
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
University of Turku, Finland.
Source
Nurs Ethics. 2019 Mar; 26(2):378-389
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Ethics, Nursing
Female
Finland
Grounded Theory
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Personhood
Qualitative Research
Quality of Health Care - ethics - standards
Stroke - complications - psychology
Abstract
Dignity is seen as an important but complex concept in the healthcare context. In this context, the discussion of dignity includes concepts of other ethical principles such as autonomy and privacy. Patients consider dignity to cover individuality, patient's feelings, communication, and the behavior of healthcare personnel. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning the realization of patients' dignity in hospital care and the focus of the study is therefore on the realization of dignity of the vulnerable group of patients with stroke.
The aim of the study was to create a theoretical construct to describe the dignity realization of patients with stroke in hospital care.
Patients with stroke (n = 16) were interviewed in 2015 using a semi-structured interview containing open questions concerning dignity. The data were analyzed using constant comparison of Grounded Theory.
Ethical approval for the research was obtained from the Ethics Committee of the University. The permission for the research was given by the hospital. Informed consent was obtained from participants.
The "Theory of Dignity Realization of Patients with Stroke in Hospital Care" consists of a core category including generic elements of the new situation and dignity realization types. The core category was identified as "Dignity in a new situation" and the generic elements as health history, life history, individuality and stroke. Dignity of patients with stroke is realized through specific types of realization: person-related dignity type, control-related dignity type, independence-related dignity type, social-related dignity type, and care-related dignity type.
The theory has similar elements with the previous literature but the whole construct is new. The theory reveals possible special characteristics in dignity realization of patients with stroke.
For healthcare personnel, the theory provides a frame for a better understanding and recognition of how dignity of patients with stroke is realized.
PubMed ID
28659067 View in PubMed
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Ethical codes in nursing practice: the viewpoint of Finnish, Greek and Italian nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168195
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2006 Aug;55(3):310-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Anne Heikkinen
Chryssoula Lemonidou
Konstantinos Petsios
Roberta Sala
Gaia Barazzetti
Stefania Radaelli
Helena Leino-Kilpi
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. anne.heikkinen@auriamail.net
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2006 Aug;55(3):310-9
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Nursing Research
Codes of Ethics
Ethics, Nursing
Female
Finland
Focus Groups
Greece
Humans
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Nurses - psychology
Nursing Process - ethics
Abstract
This paper is a report of a study exploring the use of ethical codes and obstacles to their use in nursing practice as perceived by Finnish, Greek and Italian nurses.
In all European countries nurses are responsible for the well-being of patients, for their own technical and ethical competence and, for their own part, for the high standard of health care in society. These points illustrate the central content areas of nursing codes of ethics. Recent advances in medical technology have added to the complexity of nursing. Nurses today are increasingly confronted with ethical dilemmas, underlining the role and meaning of ethical codes in their decision-making. However, there is only very limited research literature on codes of ethics, their use in nursing practice and obstacles to their use.
Twenty-three focus group interviews were conducted in 2003 with a total of 138 Registered Nurses: 35 in Finland, 54 in Greece and 49 in Italy. The data were content analysed.
Two main categories emerged from our analysis of the use of ethical codes: (1) conscious and (2) unconscious use. Seven main categories described the obstacles to the use of ethical codes: (1) the codes themselves, (2) nurses themselves, (3) multiprofessional teamwork, (4) patients' family members, (5) the organization, (6) the nursing profession and (7) society/healthcare policy. Participants in all three countries were firmly committed to the values expressed in ethical nursing codes. Nonetheless, continued efforts are needed in all these countries to remove the remaining obstacles so that nursing care can be provided in keeping with the requirements of ethical codes.
The use of codes is connected with the changes in nursing profession and in society at large. The core of nursing, however, has remained stable. Future studies should be conducted in order to generalize the findings to a broader population.
PubMed ID
16866825 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.