Skip header and navigation

Refine By

35257 records – page 1 of 3526.

Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS)
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Research
Researcher Profiles
Research Personnel
Financial Support
Abstract
The Directory of Arctic Researchers, funded by the National Science Foundation, contains the names, addresses, science specialties, and current research of 4120 Arctic researchers and specialists. It aids networking between individual investigators, institutions, funding agencies, and Arctic stakeholders to facilitate Arctic research and education efforts.
Online Resources
Less detail

Circumpolar Health Research Network (CHRN)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288449
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Circumpolar Health Research Network (CHRN)
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Research
Researcher Profiles
Research Personnel
Publications
Communication
Arctic Region
Abstract
CirchNet is the coming together of two international circumpolar health organizations - theInternational Network for Circumpolar Health Research (INCHR) and theInternational Association of Circumpolar Health Publishers (IACHP). It aims to: Promote cooperation and collaboration among health researchers engaged in research in the circumpolar region; Facilitate the exchange, communication and dissemination of research results and other health data; Support the training and development of researchers in circumpolar health; Publish the International Journal of Circumpolar Health and other scholarly publications.
Online Resources
Less detail

Ethics in qualitative health research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181167
Source
Ann R Coll Physicians Surg Can. 2002 Dec;35(8 Suppl.):563-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Kathleen M Oberle
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, 2500 University Dr. N.W., Calgary AB T2N 1N4, Canada. oberle@ucalgary.ca
Source
Ann R Coll Physicians Surg Can. 2002 Dec;35(8 Suppl.):563-6
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavioral Research - ethics
Canada
Confidentiality
Consent Forms
Ethics Committees, Research
Ethics, Research
Guidelines as Topic
Health Services Research - ethics
Humans
Informed Consent - standards
Privacy
Qualitative Research
Research Design
Research Subjects
Researcher-Subject Relations
Risk assessment
Abstract
Since the release of the Tri-Council Policy Statement (TCPS), there has been a growing interest in research ethics concommitant with an increase in the use of qualitative design for health research. Qualitative studies present unique ethical problems that may be poorly understood by researchers and research ethics boards (REBs).
To describe the ethical problems in qualitative research, and to make recommendations that will help researchers develop ethical qualitative proposals, and help REBs review these proposals.
Review of literature and philosophical analysis.
Qualitative studies raise unique issues with respect to methods, protection from harm, informed consent, privacy, and confidentiality, all of which are central to the principles of the TCPS. The problems are partly inherent, as the design tends to emerge as the study proceeds, and the research question may change. Researchers and REBs must become more aware, through education and critical reflection, of the types of problems that might arise in these studies, and of the approaches that might be taken to minimize risk to participants.
PubMed ID
15015501 View in PubMed
Less detail

Considerations for research ethics boards in evaluating qualitative studies: lessons from an ethnographic study with adolescent females.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181166
Source
Ann R Coll Physicians Surg Can. 2002 Dec;35(8 Suppl.):567-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Elizabeth Banister
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 1700, Victoria BC V8W 2Y2, Canada. ebanister@uvic.ca
Source
Ann R Coll Physicians Surg Can. 2002 Dec;35(8 Suppl.):567-70
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Anthropology, Cultural - ethics
Behavioral Research - ethics - standards
Canada
Courtship
Ethics Committees, Research
Ethics, Research
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Qualitative Research
Research Personnel - standards
Research Subjects
Researcher-Subject Relations
Abstract
Research ethics boards (REBs) have traditionally been required to evaluate quantitative research proposals. They are, however, increasingly facing the need to evaluate the ethical implications of proposals involving qualitative research. This article discusses one form of qualitative research, ethnography, in light of possible ethical concerns. It suggests ways in which ethical issues may be addressed, and provides examples drawn from an ethnographic study of adolescent girls' health concerns in their dating relationships. Recommendations for REBs are included.
PubMed ID
15015502 View in PubMed
Less detail

Northern Institute for Environmental and Minority Law (NIEM)

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288518
Publication Type
Website
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
University of Lapland
Language
English
Finnish
Russian
Swedish
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Website
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Research
Researcher Profiles
Arctic Regions
Population Groups
Environment
Abstract
The NIEM has a special focus on studying the law relating to (Arctic) indigenous peoples and environmental law as it applies in the Arctic and northern region.
Online Resources
Less detail

"It's not as cool as shooting birds": building research relationships in Aboriginal communities

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286415
Source
Pages 410-413 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2010
••@Ai ',:::; C: :C ',QLIS rl EALTH AN D WELLBE IN G Research relationships in Aboriginal communities "IT'S NOT AS COOL AS SHOOTING BIRDS": BUILDING RESEARCH RELATIONSHIPS IN ABORIGINAL COMMUNITIES Julie Bull Aboriginal Education, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Canada
  1 document  
Author
Julie Bull
Author Affiliation
Aboriginal Education, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, Canada
Source
Pages 410-413 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Research ethics
Aboriginal research
Community-based research
Relationship building
Abstract
This study was conceptualized from a partnership between Aboriginal communities in Labrador, Canada, and the researcher as a result of the Community Health Research in Labrador project, Listening, Learning, and Working Together (2006), where research ethics and the governance of research involving Aboriginal peoples in Labrador were identified as research priorities. Based on this priority and the premise that Aboriginal peoples have endured a history of exploitation through research, leaving people and communities vulnerable, this research examines the current state of ethical governance of health research with Aboriginal peoples in Labrador. Interviews with key informants have shown that a history of perceived exploitation in research, a shortage of human resource and financial capacity, and past and present relationships with governments, influence the ways in which ethics and research are understood at the community level. Labrador criticisms of research are congruent with the literature in that they reflect the need for an Aboriginal-centric research ethics, and include the historical political context of assimilation and the historical research context of exploitation and exoticism. In research with Aboriginal peoples, the precursor to ethical research is an authentic relationship, that is, a relationship built from an undisputed origin (through research agreements or memorandums of understanding) that is genuine in nature and in which the partners are trustworthy and reliable.
Documents
Less detail

The handbook of ethical research with ethnocultural populations and communities

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100794
Source
Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 336 pp.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2006
Source
Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 336 pp.
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Other
Keywords
Biomedical and health research
Community-based research
Cultural responsiveness
Culturally centered measurement
Ethnic minorities
Ethnographic research
Health disparities
Multicultural research
Research ethics
Abstract
CONTENTS: Introduction: our shared journey: lessons from the past to protect the future / Joseph E. Trimble and Celia B. Fisher -- Part I. Foundations of ethnocultural research and research ethics. A goodness-of-fit ethic for multicultural research / Celia B. Fisher and Kathleen Ragsdale -- Scientist-community collaborations: a dynamic tension between rights and responsibilities / John Fantuzzo, Christine McWayne, and Stephanie Childs -- First, do no harm: culturally centered measurement for early intervention / Nancy Busch-Rossnagel -- Part II. Research ethics challenges involving diverse ethnocultural groups. Addressing health disparities through relational ethics: an approach to increasing African American participation in biomedical and health research / Scyatta A. Wallace -- In their own voices: American Indian decisions to participate in health research / Tim D. Noe, Spero M. Manson, Calvin Croy, Helen McGough, Jeffrey A. Henderson, and Dedra S. Buchwald -- "I wonder, why would you do it that way?" Ethical dilemmas in doing participatory research with Alaska Native communities / Gerald V. Mohatt and Lisa R. Thomas -- Ethical conduct of research with Asian and Pacific Islander American populations / Jean Lau Chin, Jeffery Scott Mio, and Gayle Y. Iwamasa -- Ethical community-based research with Hispanic/Latina(o) populations: balancing research rigor and cultural responsiveness / Felipe Gonza?lez Castro, Rebecca Rios, and Harry Montoya -- Ethical issues in research with immigrants and refugees / Dina Birman -- Part III. Socially sensitive research involving ethnocultural families and communities. Ethical research with ethnic minorities in the child welfare system / Katherine Ann Gilda Elliott and Anthony J. Urquiza -- With all due respect: ethical issues in the study of vulnerable adolescents / Ana Mari Cauce and Richard H. Nobles -- Ethical research with ethnic minority elders / Susan Krauss Whitbourne, Joshua R. Bringle, Barbara W.K. Yee, David A. Chiriboga, and Keith Whitfield -- Changing models of research ethics in prevention research within ethnic communities / Fred Beauvais -- Ethnographic research on drugs and HIV/AIDS in ethnocultural communities / Merrill Singer and Delia Easton -- Part IV. The rights and responsibilities of individuals, communities, and institutions. Safeguarding sacred lives: the ethical use of archival data for the study of diverse lives / Copeland H. Young and Monica Brooker -- Ethical issues when white researchers study ALANA and immigrant people and communities / Janet E. Helms, Kevin T. Henze, Jackquelyn Mascher, and Anmol Satiani -- Coda: the virtuous and responsible researcher in another culture / Joseph E. Trimble and Gerald V. Mohatt.
Notes
Available in ARLIS General Collection: GN495.4.T75 2006.
Less detail

Perspectives on research in American Indian communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3103
Source
Jurimetrics. 2002;42(2):145-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Malcolm B Bowekaty
Author Affiliation
Zuni Indian Tribe.
Source
Jurimetrics. 2002;42(2):145-8
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Genetic Research
Human Experimentation - standards
Humans
Indians, North American - genetics
Ownership
Research
Research Design
Research Subjects
Abstract
This article discusses research-oriented responsibilities of the Zuni governor and tribal council to the Zuni people. To reduce potential negative effects and to enhance the lifestyle of the Zuni, these bodies screen and review research in an effort to ascertain compliance with tribal law, to be culturally respectful, and to determine what, if any, beneficial effects the research will have for the Zuni people. As a result, studies concerning high prevalence disease, such as diabetes, are given preference. These principles may apply to other American Indian and Alaskan native communities.
PubMed ID
15119328 View in PubMed
Less detail

How does the public perceive the motives of medical researchers for doing research?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192836
Source
Bull Med Ethics. 1999 Mar;No. 146:16-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1999

35257 records – page 1 of 3526.