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Challenges of major incident management when excess resources are allocated: experiences from a mass casualty incident after roof collapse of a military command center.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49649
Source
Prehospital Disaster Med. 2004 Apr-Jun;19(2):179-84
Publication Type
Article
Author
Luis Romundstad
Knut Ole Sundnes
Johan Pillgram-Larsen
Geir K Røste
Mads Gilbert
Author Affiliation
Medical Battalion, Division 6, Norwegian Defense Forces. luisro@klinmed.uio.no
Source
Prehospital Disaster Med. 2004 Apr-Jun;19(2):179-84
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cold Climate
Construction Materials
Disaster Planning - organization & administration
Disasters
Emergency Medical Service Communication Systems
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - organization & administration
Europe
Humans
International Cooperation
Leadership
Military Medicine - organization & administration
Norway
Rescue Work - manpower - organization & administration
Snow
Time Factors
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - therapy
Abstract
During a military exercise in northern Norway in March 2000, the snow-laden roof of a command center collapsed with 76 persons inside. Twenty-five persons were entrapped and/or buried under snow masses. There were three deaths. Seven patients had serious injuries, three had moderate injuries, and 16 had minor injuries. A military Convalescence Camp that had been set up in a Sports Hall 125 meters from the scene was reorganized as a causality clearing station. Officers from the Convalescence Camp initially organized search and rescue. In all, 417 persons took part in the rescue work with 36 ambulances, 17 helicopters, three ambulance airplanes and one transport plane available. Two ambulances, five helicopters and one transport aircraft were used. Four patients were evacuated to a civilian hospital and six to a field hospital. The stretcher and treatment teams initially could have been more effectively organized. As resources were ample, this was a mass casualty, not a disaster. Firm incident command prevented the influx of excess resources.
PubMed ID
15506256 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Coast Guard medevac mission in Southeast Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184603
Source
Air Med J. 2003 Jul-Aug;22(4):20-3
Publication Type
Article

[Helicopters in health care can solve the logistics and strengthen the competence]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88666
Source
Lakartidningen. 2009 Apr 22-28;106(17):1182-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sundstrom Karin
Svensén Christer
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för medicinsk epidemiologi och biostatistik, Karolinska institutet. karin.sundstrom@ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2009 Apr 22-28;106(17):1182-5
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Ambulances - manpower - standards
Clinical Competence
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - organization & administration - standards
Humans
Physicians
Rescue Work - manpower - organization & administration - standards
Sweden
PubMed ID
19530428 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The air ambulance service in Bodö].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190840
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Feb 10;122(4):429
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-10-2002