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Alaska maternal and child health data book 2008: Health status edition

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100747
Publication Type
Report
Date
2008
  1 website  
Author
Alaska Division of Public Health, Section of Maternal, Child and Family Health
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Adolescent and teen health
Birth outcomes
Child health
Infant health
Key indicators
Maternal health
Population Characteristics
Prenatal health
Prenatal risks
Reproductive health
Women?s health
Abstract
In 2003, the Maternal and Child Health (MCH ) Epidemiology Unit published the first of a series of reference books on the epidemiology of maternal, infant and child health in Alaska. The "Alaska Maternal and Child Health Data Book 2008" updates and builds upon the work presented in the first data book, featuring information on the health status of Alaskan mothers, infants, children and families.
Online Resources
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Alaska Maternal and Child Health Data Book 2011: Alaska Native Edition.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287909
Source
A collaboration of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, and the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Alaska Native Epidemiology Center. 118 pages.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2011
Characteristics of Women Who Delivered a Live Birth, Alaska, 2008 ............................ 9 Chapter.References................................................................................................ 10 Chapter 2: Reproductive Health ......................................................... 11
  1 document  
Author
Young MB
Perham-Hester KA
Kemberling MM.
Source
A collaboration of the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, and the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Alaska Native Epidemiology Center. 118 pages.
Date
2011
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
19458292
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Alaska
Alaska Natives
Maternal
Child
Reproductive health care
Demographics
Substance use
Infant
Abstract
This edition of the Alaska MCH Data Book will provide policy makers, public health professionals and health care providers with critical data on leading issues affecting women before, during and after pregnancy, and preschool age children. This book is unique in that it reports all analyses by Alaska Native status and, in some cases, by tribal health region. The goal of this book is to provide data that can be used in both tribal and non-tribal programs to design, implement, monitor, and evaluate programs. By focusing on Alaska Native status these data will be particularly helpful to health care staff and administrators in areas of rural Alaska that serve predominantly Alaska Native people. Please share with us how you have used the data published here. You may contact the PRAMS/CUBS staff by e-mail at mch-epi@alaska.gov or by phone at 1-888-269-3470.
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Alcohol consumption and binge drinking in early pregnancy. A cross-sectional study with data from the Copenhagen Pregnancy Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274252
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2015;15:327
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Mette Langeland Iversen
Nina Olsén Sørensen
Lotte Broberg
Peter Damm
Morten Hedegaard
Ann Tabor
Hanne Kristine Hegaard
Source
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth. 2015;15:327
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Binge Drinking - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Preconception Care - methods
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology - prevention & control
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Prevalence
Reproductive health
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
Since 2007 the Danish Health and Medicines Authority has advised total alcohol abstinence from the time of trying to conceive and throughout pregnancy. The prevalence of binge drinking among pregnant Danish women has nevertheless been reported to be up to 48 % during early pregnancy. Since the introduction of the recommendation of total abstinence, no studies have examined pre-pregnancy lifestyle and reproductive risk factors associated with this behaviour in a Danish context. The aims of this study were therefore to describe the prevalence of weekly alcohol consumption and binge drinking in early pregnancy among women living in the capital of Denmark. Secondly to identify pre-pregnancy lifestyle and reproductive risk factors associated with binge drinking during early pregnancy.
Data were collected from September 2012 to August 2013 at the Department of Obstetrics, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. Self-reported information on each woman's socio-demographic characteristics, medical history, and lifestyle factors including alcohol habits was obtained from an electronic questionnaire filled out as part of the individual medical record. Descriptive analysis was conducted and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess the potential associated risk factors (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)).
Questionnaires from 3,238 women were included. A majority of 70 %, reported weekly alcohol consumption before pregnancy. The prevalence decreased to 3 % during early pregnancy. The overall proportion of women reporting binge drinking during early pregnancy was 35 % (n?=?1,134). The following independent risk factors for binge drinking in early pregnancy were identified: lower degree of planned pregnancy, smoking and alcohol habits before pregnancy ((1 unit/weekly aOR 4.48, CI: 3.14 - 6.40), (2-7 units aOR 10.23, CI: 7.44-14.06), (=8 units aOR 33.18, CI: 19.53-56.36)). Multiparity and the use of assisted reproductive technology were associated with lower odds of binge drinking in early pregnancy.
The prevalence of weekly alcohol consumption decreased considerably during early pregnancy compared with pre-pregnancy levels. Nevertheless one third of the pregnant women engaged in binge drinking. Identification of risk factors for this behaviour renders it possible not only to design prevention strategies, but also to target those most at risk.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26645438 View in PubMed
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Aligning method with theory: a comparison of two approaches to modeling the social determinants of health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128651
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2012 Dec;16(9):1870-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Patricia O'Campo
Marcelo Urquia
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research on Inner City Health, The Keenan Research Centre in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, 30 Bond St, Toronto, ON, M5B 1W8, Canada. pat.ocampo@utoronto.ca
Source
Matern Child Health J. 2012 Dec;16(9):1870-8
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Depression, Postpartum - psychology
Female
Health Impact Assessment
Health Status Disparities
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Life Change Events
Logistic Models
Models, Biological
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Pregnancy outcome
Prenatal Care - methods - statistics & numerical data
Reproductive health
Residence Characteristics
Social Environment
Socioeconomic Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
There is increasing interest in the study of the social determinants of maternal and child health. While there has been growth in the theory and empirical evidence about social determinants, less attention has been paid to the kind of modeling that should be used to understand the impact of social exposures on well-being. We analyzed data from the nationwide 2006 Canadian Maternity Experiences Survey to compare the pervasive disease-specific model to a model that captures the generalized health impact (GHI) of social exposures, namely low socioeconomic position. The GHI model uses a composite of adverse conditions that stem from low socioeconomic position: adverse birth outcomes, postpartum depression, severe abuse, stressful life events, and hospitalization during pregnancy. Adjusted prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals from disease-specific models for low income (
Notes
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PubMed ID
22183165 View in PubMed
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American Indian and Alaska Native Men's Use of Sexual Health Services, 2006-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291987
Source
Perspect Sex Reprod Health. 2017 Sep; 49(3):181-189
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Megan A Cahn
S Marie Harvey
Matthew A Town
Author Affiliation
Postdoctoral research fellow, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR.
Source
Perspect Sex Reprod Health. 2017 Sep; 49(3):181-189
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska Natives - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Attitude to Health - ethnology
European Continental Ancestry Group - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Misuse - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Men's Health - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Needs Assessment
Reproductive Health Services - utilization
Sex Counseling - statistics & numerical data
Sexual Health - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
American Indian and Alaska Native men experience poorer sexual health than white men. Barriers related to their sex and racial identity may prevent them from seeking care; however, little is known about this population's use of sexual health services.
Sexual health service usage was examined among 923 American Indian and Alaska Native men and 5,322 white men aged 15-44 who participated in the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth. Logistic regression models explored differences in service use by race and examined correlates of use among American Indians and Alaska Natives.
Among men aged 15-19 and those aged 35-44, men with incomes greater than 133% of the federal poverty level, men with private insurance, those living in the Northeast and those living in rural areas, American Indians and Alaska Natives were more likely than whites to use STD or HIV services (odds ratios, 1.5-3.2). The odds of birth control service use did not differ by race. Differences in service use were found among American Indian and Alaska Native men: For example, those with a usual source of care had elevated odds of using sexual health services (1.9-3.4), while those reporting no recent testicular exam had reduced odds of using these services (0.3-0.4).
This study provides baseline data on American Indian and Alaska Native men's use of sexual health services. Research exploring these men's views on these services is needed to help develop programs that better serve them.
PubMed ID
28758709 View in PubMed
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An analysis of two indigenous reproductive health illnesses in a Nahua community in Veracruz, Mexico.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121378
Source
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2012;8:33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Vania Smith-Oka
Author Affiliation
Anthropology Department, 611 Flanner Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA. vsmithok@nd.edu
Source
J Ethnobiol Ethnomed. 2012;8:33
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Female
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Medicine, Traditional
Mexico
Middle Aged
Midwifery
Phytotherapy
Plant Preparations - therapeutic use
Plants, Medicinal
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - drug therapy
Qualitative Research
Reproductive health
Uterine Prolapse - drug therapy - etiology
Wasting Syndrome - drug therapy - etiology
Women's health
Young Adult
Abstract
This article describes the local concepts indigenous Nahua women hold regarding their reproduction. Specifically it provides a description of two indigenous illnesses--isihuayo and necaxantle, it discusses their etiology, symptoms, and treatments, and it analyzes them within the local ethnomedical framework and sociopolitical context. A perception of female vulnerability is shown to be an underlying shaper of women's experiences of these illnesses.
This research took place in a small Nahua village in Mexico. Qualitative data on local perceptions of these illnesses were collected by a combination of participant observation and interviews. Ethnobotanical data was obtained through interviews, and medicinal plants were collected in home gardens, fields, stream banks, and forested areas. The total study population consisted of traditional birth attendants (N = 5), clinicians (N = 8), and laywomen (N = 48).
Results showed that 20% of the village women had suffered from one or both of these illnesses. The article includes a detailed description of the etiology, symptoms, and treatments of these illnesses. Data shows that they were caused by mechanical, physical, and social factors related to a woman's weakness and/or lack of support. Traditional birth attendants often treated women's illnesses. Five medicinal plants were salient in the treatment of these illnesses: Ocimum basilicum L., Mentzelia aspera L., Pedilanthus tithymaloides (L.) Poit., and Piper umbellatum L. were used for isihuayo, while Solanum wendlandii Hook f. was used for necaxantle.
The research on these two ethnomedical conditions is a useful case study to understanding how indigenous women experience reproductive health. Reproductive health is not simply about clinically-based medicine but is also about how biomedicine intersects with the local bodily concepts. By describing and analyzing indigenous women's ill health, one can focus upon the combination of causes--which extend beyond the physical body and into the larger structure that the women exist in.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22913545 View in PubMed
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Association Between Use of Marijuana and Male Reproductive Hormones and Semen Quality: A Study Among 1,215 Healthy Young Men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268197
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2015 Sep 15;182(6):473-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2015
Author
Tina Djernis Gundersen
Niels Jørgensen
Anna-Maria Andersson
Anne Kirstine Bang
Loa Nordkap
Niels E Skakkebæk
Lærke Priskorn
Anders Juul
Tina Kold Jensen
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2015 Sep 15;182(6):473-81
Date
Sep-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Healthy Volunteers
Humans
Incidence
Male
Marijuana Abuse - blood - epidemiology
Reproductive health
Retrospective Studies
Semen Analysis - methods
Sperm Count
Testosterone - blood
Young Adult
Abstract
A total of 1,215 young Danish men aged 18-28 years were recruited between 2008 and 2012 when they attended a compulsory medical examination to determine their fitness for military service. The participants delivered a semen sample, had a blood sample drawn, and underwent a physical examination. They responded to questionnaires including information on marijuana and recreational drug use during the past 3 months (no use, use once per week or less, or use more than once per week). A total of 45% had smoked marijuana within the last 3 months. Regular marijuana smoking more than once per week was associated with a 28% (95% confidence interval (CI): -48, -1) lower sperm concentration and a 29% (95% CI: -46, -1) lower total sperm count after adjustment for confounders. The combined use of marijuana more than once per week and other recreational drugs reduced the sperm concentration by 52% (95% CI: -68, -27) and total sperm count by 55% (95% CI: -71, -31). Marijuana smokers had higher levels of testosterone within the same range as cigarette smokers. Our findings are of public interest as marijuana use is common and may be contributing to recent reports of poor semen quality.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 2015 Sep 15;182(6):482-426283091
PubMed ID
26283092 View in PubMed
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Associations between advanced maternal age and psychological distress in primiparous women, from early pregnancy to 18 months postpartum.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123402
Source
BJOG. 2012 Aug;119(9):1108-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
V. Aasheim
U. Waldenström
A. Hjelmstedt
S. Rasmussen
H. Pettersson
E. Schytt
Author Affiliation
Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. vaa@hib.no
Source
BJOG. 2012 Aug;119(9):1108-16
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - etiology
Employment
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Norway - epidemiology
Parity
Postnatal Care
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Reproductive health
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
To investigate if advanced maternal age at first birth increases the risk of psychological distress during pregnancy at 17 and 30 weeks of gestation and at 6 and 18 months after birth.
National cohort study.
Norway.
A total of 19 291 nulliparous women recruited between 1999 and 2008 from hospitals and maternity units.
Questionnaire data were obtained from the longitudinal Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, and register data from the national Medical Birth Register. Advanced maternal age was defined as = 32 years and a reference group of women aged 25-31 years was used for comparisons. The distribution of psychological distress from 20 to = 40 years was investigated, and the prevalence of psychological distress at the four time-points was estimated. Logistic regression analyses based on generalised estimation equations were used to investigate associations between advanced maternal age and psychological distress.
Psychological distress measured by SCL-5.
Women of advanced age had slightly higher scores of psychological distress over the period than the reference group, also after controlling for obstetric and infant variables. The youngest women had the highest scores. A history of depression increased the risk of distress in all women. With no history of depression, women of advanced age were not at higher risk. Changes over time were similar between groups and lowest at 6 months.
Women of 32 years and beyond had slightly increased risk of psychological distress during pregnancy and the first 18 months of motherhood compared with women aged 25-31 years.
PubMed ID
22703587 View in PubMed
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Associations between psychological well-being, mental health, and hormone therapy in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women: results of two population-based studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117649
Source
Menopause. 2013 Jun;20(6):667-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Elena Toffol
Oskari Heikinheimo
Timo Partonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. elena.toffol@thl.fi
Source
Menopause. 2013 Jun;20(6):667-76
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Affect
Aged
Anxiety
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression
Estrogen Replacement Therapy
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Mental health
Middle Aged
Perimenopause - physiology - psychology
Postmenopause - physiology - psychology
Questionnaires
Reproductive health
Abstract
A proportion of women experience depressive and anxiety symptoms and/or disorders in connection with the menopausal transition. Estrogen-only therapy has been reported to have beneficial effects on mental health, but the effects of combined hormone therapy (HT) on mental health are less clear. We studied the associations between HT use and psychopathology in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women.
Data on women who participated in the Health 2000 Survey and the National FINRISK Surveys in Finland were analyzed.
An association between current HT use and psychiatric diagnosis in the previous 12 months was found. In addition, HT use was associated with recent self-reported diagnosis of depression and with depressed mood (FINRISK), as well as with major depressive disorder and anxiety disorder (Health 2000). Associations with the following symptoms were found: nervousness, frightening thoughts, nightmares, and headache (FINRISK), feelings of depression (FINRISK and Health 2000), and unhappiness (Health 2000). No differences between different routes of administration or types of HT emerged.
Current use of HT in perimenopausal and postmenopausal women is associated with worse psychological well-being and mental health than in women not using HT. It is important to identify women in need of psychiatric support at the time of the menopausal transition.
Notes
Comment In: Climacteric. 2013 Jun;16(3):399-40023814881
PubMed ID
23277355 View in PubMed
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104 records – page 1 of 11.