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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Assisted reproduction without assisting over-collection: fair information practices and the assisted human reproduction agency of Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153396
Source
Health Law J. 2009;17:229-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009

The early days of IVF outside the UK.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63209
Source
Hum Reprod Update. 2005 Sep-Oct;11(5):439-59
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jean Cohen
Alan Trounson
Karen Dawson
Howard Jones
Johan Hazekamp
Karl-Gösta Nygren
Lars Hamberger
Author Affiliation
Clinique Marignan, 8 Rue de Marignan, 75008 Paris, France. jeanco@club-internet.fr
Source
Hum Reprod Update. 2005 Sep-Oct;11(5):439-59
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Australia
Embryo Transfer
Europe
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - history - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
France
Government Regulation
Great Britain
History, 20th Century
Humans
Oocytes - physiology
Pregnancy
Public Opinion
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - legislation & jurisprudence
Ultrasonography, Prenatal - methods - trends
United States
Abstract
In this article the history of IVF in geographical regions outside the UK are traced by pioneers of that time. Following the birth of Louise Brown in 1978, live births after IVF occurred in Australia in 1980, in the USA in 1981 and in Sweden and France in 1982. Following the first IVF birth in Australia, the Government of Victoria established a review of IVF research and practice which led to the proclamation of the Infertility (Medical Procedures) Act 1984, the first legislation to regulate IVF and its associated human embryo research. Despite such restriction, IVF doctors and scientists from Victoria, especially those under the leadership of Carl Wood, Alan Trounson and Ian Johnston continued to initiate new treatments for infertility and new methods for delivering this treatment. In the USA IVF research began on animals as early as the 1930s, when Pincus and Enzmann at Harvard were involved in attempts at IVF in the rabbit. In the 1940s, John Rock attempted human IVF with 138 human oocytes without success. In 1965, Bob Edwards was with Georgeanna and Howard Jones at Johns Hopkins where attempts were made to fertilize oocytes in vitro. Clinical IVF began in earnest in the USA in 1980 with the first birth in 1981 achieved by the use of HMG--a first successful use with IVF. In France, two groups Frydman and Testart (Clamart) and Cohen, Mandelbaum and Plachot (Sevres) focused their research in particular directions. In 1981, the Clamart group developed a plasma assay for the initial rise in LH. The Sevres group developed a transport technique. Plachot produced a long series of cytogenetic analyses of oocytes and human embryos. Mandelbaum described the microstructures of the human oocyte. The start of IVF in France benefited from the help of animal researchers from the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique. The first babies were born in Clamart in February 1982 and in Sèvres in June 1982. Important contributions to the development of IVF from the Nordic countries include techniques for ovarian stimulation, sonographic techniques for monitoring and vaginal oocyte retrieval and also unique possibilities for monitoring IVF safety. These developments, in combination with relatively permissive laws for the practice of reproductive medicine and relatively generous reimbursement policies, as well as a general public confidence in IVF, have led to an exceptionally high availability of IVF, within international comparison.
PubMed ID
15923202 View in PubMed
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[Fertility treatment in Denmark--development and challenges].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119994
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Oct 8;174(41):2439-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-8-2012
Author
Hans Jakob Ingerslev
Peter Humaidan
Anders Nyboe Andersen
Author Affiliation
Fertilitetsklinikken, Aarhus Universitetshospital, Aarhus. jakob.ingerslev@skejby.rm.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Oct 8;174(41):2439-43
Date
Oct-8-2012
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Denmark
Female
Humans
Infertility, Female - therapy
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Rate
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - legislation & jurisprudence - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
In Denmark, a total of 31,000 assisted reproductive technology (ART) and intrauterine insemination treatments yearly results in the delivery of around 6,300 children, which represents 9% of the Danish birth cohort. The delivery rate following ART (in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmatic sperm injection, frozen embryo replacement and oocyte donation) has been stable around 20% per cycle initiated during the last decade, despite the transfer of fewer embryos. The future challenges are the increasing age of women seeking fertility treatment, the development of biomarkers of embryonic implantation potential as well as the improvement of embryo culture, and embryo freezing techniques.
PubMed ID
23050682 View in PubMed
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Patchwork regulations likely outcome of reproductive technologies ruling.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137441
Source
CMAJ. 2011 Mar 8;183(4):E215-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-8-2011

Reducing multiple pregnancies after assisted reproduction treatment: Qu├ębec says 'Yes, we can!'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132155
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2011 Oct;23(4):407-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Yakoub Khalaf
Susan Bewley
Peter Braude
Author Affiliation
Assisted Conception Unit and Centre for Pre-implantation Genetic Diagnosis, London, UK. yakoub.khalaf@kcl.ac.uk
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2011 Oct;23(4):407-10
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Embryo Transfer
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Personal Autonomy
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - etiology
Pregnancy outcome
Pregnancy Rate
Pregnancy, Multiple
Pregnancy, Twin
Quebec
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - legislation & jurisprudence
Risk
Single Embryo Transfer
Abstract
Multiple pregnancy (MP) is widely recognized as the single biggest risk to children born as a result of assisted reproduction treatment. There is an emerging trend in Europe and Canada to promote single-embryo transfer (SET). In this issue, Gleicher argues that twin pregnancies should not be seen as an unfavourable outcome of assisted reproduction treatment. He argues that SET policies 'make no sense' since they will aggravate already unsatisfactory population growth in some countries. He also argues that governmental intervention to impose SET policies, despite proving successful in reducing MP, are inappropriate. The overwhelming evidence in the literature indicates that his opinion is not supported by credible data. Views should be based on solid data rather than personal judgement. Governmental interventions to reduce twin pregnancies, as demonstrated previously in Belgium and now in Québec, have been successful. The risks of twin pregnancies are real and borne by women and children, not their doctors. Doctors managing infertile couples are no longer entitled to take risks with the health of the next generation.
Notes
Comment In: Reprod Biomed Online. 2011 Oct;23(4):399-40021843967
PubMed ID
21843969 View in PubMed
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Wombs for rent: an examination of prohibitory and regulatory approaches to governing preconception arrangements.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186020
Source
Health Law Can. 2003 Feb;23(3):33-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2003
Author
Melody Chen
Author Affiliation
Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP, Toronto.
Source
Health Law Can. 2003 Feb;23(3):33-50
Date
Feb-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child Custody - legislation & jurisprudence
Commerce - legislation & jurisprudence
Criminal Law
Family Planning Services - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Fertilization in Vitro - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Regulation
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Informed Consent - legislation & jurisprudence
Insemination, Artificial, Heterologous
Law Enforcement
Ontario
Pregnancy
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - legislation & jurisprudence
Surrogate Mothers - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
On October 9, 2002, Bill C-13 had its first reading in the Canadian House of Commons. Bill C-13 was in the same form as Bill C-56 of the First Session of the Thirty-seventh Parliament, which had its first reading on May 9, 2002. Bill C-13, an Act respecting assisted human reproduction, prohibits the practice of commercial surrogacy or preconception agreements in Canada, under threat of criminal sanction. In the first half of the article, the author discusses the deficiencies of the Bill's prohibitory approach to governing surrogacy agreements. These problems include the difficulty of implementing a criminal regime, the weak constitutional basis on which the federal government claims jurisdiction to enact a criminal prohibition of commercial surrogacy and the legislation's inability to prevent exploitation and coercion of vulnerable parties in surrogacy arrangements. In the second half of the article, the author examines an alternative regulatory scheme proposed by the Ontario Law Reform Commission and compares it to the prohibitory approach. The author concludes that the regulatory approach is much more effective than the prohibitory approach in governing the practice of commercial and non-commercial surrogacy arrangements. Regulation minimises the potentially exploitative aspects of surrogacy and provides legal protection to both parties in the agreement. The regulatory scheme proposed by the Ontario Law Reform Commission is also more effective in protecting the best interests of the child born as a result of a preconception agreement.
PubMed ID
12674583 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.