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Access to artificial reproduction technology in the Nordic countries in 2004.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89889
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(3):301-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Sol Olafsdottir Helga
Wikland Matts
Möller Anders
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden. helga.olafsdottir@nhv.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(3):301-7
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Direct Service Costs
Female
Financing, Government - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Iceland
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - economics - statistics & numerical data
Scandinavia
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To survey access to Artificial Reproduction Technology (ART) treatments in 2004 with regard to legislation, geographical location, financing and the kind of ART treatments provided in the Nordic countries. DESIGN: Retrospective descriptive survey of practice at ART clinics and legislation. SETTING: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. SAMPLE: Sixty-six ART clinics registered with the Nordic Fertility Society in autumn 2005. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to all ART clinics and a survey of legislation concerning ART treatments and public statistics was performed. The response rate was 79%. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Access to ART treatments. RESULTS: The differences in legislation among the countries mainly concerns gamete donation. Couples living in larger cities or densely populated areas have best access to ART treatments. With regard to subsidizing of treatment costs, Finland and Denmark seem to be the best of the Nordic countries. CONCLUSIONS: The main differences among the countries concern the legislation, the cost of the treatments and how those are subsidized.
PubMed ID
19241225 View in PubMed
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Access to fertility services for lesbian women in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112457
Source
Fertil Steril. 2013 Oct;100(4):1077-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
Shannon L Corbett
Helena M Frecker
Heather M Shapiro
Mark H Yudin
Author Affiliation
Ottawa Fertility Centre, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: scorbett@conceive.ca.
Source
Fertil Steril. 2013 Oct;100(4):1077-80
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Facilities - organization & administration
Canada
Female
Fertility
Health Care Surveys
Health Policy
Health Services Accessibility
Healthcare Disparities
Homosexuality, Female
Humans
Questionnaires
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted
Sex Factors
Women's Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
To determine reproductive services offered to lesbian patients by Canadian fertility clinics, policies of practice, ease of access to these services, and sensitivity of clinics to this population of patients.
Survey sent to assisted reproductive technology (ART) clinic directors.
Academic medical center, university-based ethics institute.
None.
The percentage of Canadian fertility clinics that will provide reproductive services to lesbian patients; services offered; the presence of clinic policies on lesbian care; and the presence on web sites of heteronormative material.
Completed surveys were received from 71% (24/34) of clinics. All clinics surveyed provided reproductive services to lesbian patients, with the exception of one clinic. Five of 24 (21%) clinics have a written policy on care for lesbian patients; 29% (7/24) will provide services to lesbian patients without prior investigations. All clinics will offer IUI and cycle monitoring to lesbian patients. Twenty-three of 24 clinics (96%) will offer IVF services when required. Fourteen of 32 clinic web sites (44%) make mention of lesbian patients and 27% (8/30) have heteronormative information only.
Lesbians encounter several barriers to accessing reproductive services in Canada. Addressing these issues could improve experiences of lesbian women and couples seeking care at fertility clinics.
PubMed ID
23830154 View in PubMed
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Advanced reproductive age and fertility.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129652
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2011 Nov;33(11):1165-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Kimberly Liu
Allison Case
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2011 Nov;33(11):1165-75
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous
Adult
Aging - physiology
Canada
Chromosome Aberrations - statistics & numerical data
Counseling
Female
Fertility - physiology
Humans
Infertility, Female
MEDLINE
Male
Maternal Age
Middle Aged
Oocyte Donation
Ovary - physiology
Paternal Age
Pregnancy
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - economics
Risk factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To improve awareness of the natural age-related decline in female and male fertility with respect to natural fertility and assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and provide recommendations for their management, and to review investigations in the assessment of ovarian aging.
This guideline reviews options for the assessment of ovarian reserve and fertility treatments using ART with women of advanced reproductive age presenting with infertility.
The outcomes measured are the predictive value of ovarian reserve testing and pregnancy rates with natural and assisted fertility.
Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed or Medline, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library in June 2010, using appropriate key words (ovarian aging, ovarian reserve, advanced maternal age, advanced paternal age, ART). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated into the guideline to December 2010.
The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care. Recommendations for practice were ranked according to the method described in that report (Table).
Primary and specialist health care providers and women will be better informed about ovarian aging and the age-related decline in natural fertility and about options for assisted reproductive technology.
1. Women in their 20s and 30s should be counselled about the age-related risk of infertility when other reproductive health issues, such as sexual health or contraception, are addressed as part of their primary well-woman care. Reproductive-age women should be aware that natural fertility and assisted reproductive technology success (except with egg donation) is significantly lower for women in their late 30s and 40s. (II-2A) 2. Because of the decline in fertility and the increased time to conception that occurs after the age of 35, women > 35 years of age should be referred for infertility work-up after 6 months of trying to conceive. (III-B) 3. Ovarian reserve testing may be considered for women = 35 years of age or for women 40 years of age. Women > 40 years should consider IVF if they do not conceive within 1 to 2 cycles of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation. (II-2B) 6. The only effective treatment for ovarian aging is oocyte donation. A woman with decreased ovarian reserve should be offered oocyte donation as an option, as pregnancy rates associated with this treatment are significantly higher than those associated with controlled ovarian hyperstimulation or in vitro fertilization with a woman's own eggs. (II-2B) 7. Women should be informed that the risk of spontaneous pregnancy loss and chromosomal abnormalities increases with age. Women should be counselled about and offered appropriate prenatal screening once pregnancy is established. (II-2A) 8. Pre-conception counselling regarding the risks of pregnancy with advanced maternal age, promotion of optimal health and weight, and screening for concurrent medical conditions such as hypertension and diabetes should be considered for women > age 40. (III-B) 9. Advanced paternal age appears to be associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortion and increased frequency of some autosomal dominant conditions, autism spectrum disorders, and schizophrenia. Men > age 40 and their partners should be counselled about these potential risks when they are seeking pregnancy, although the risks remain small. (II-2C).
PubMed ID
22082792 View in PubMed
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Advocating for assistance with pregnancy planning in HIV-positive individuals and couples: an idea whose time has come.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135713
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2011 Mar;33(3):269-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2011
Author
Mark H Yudin
Mona Loutfy
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Toronto, St Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2011 Mar;33(3):269-71
Date
Mar-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Family Planning Services
Female
HIV Seropositivity
Humans
Infertility - therapy
Male
Pregnancy
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted
PubMed ID
21453568 View in PubMed
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Anonymity and informed consent in artificial procreation: a report from Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34199
Source
Bioethics. 1997 Jul-Oct;11(3-4):336-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
Anne Mette Lebech
Source
Bioethics. 1997 Jul-Oct;11(3-4):336-40
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Confidentiality
Denmark
Disclosure
Emotions
France
Human Rights
Humans
Informed consent
Jurisprudence
Oocyte Donation
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted
Spermatozoa
Tissue Donors
Abstract
The practice of informed consent in biomedicine is so widely spread that it must be considered the most important principle within bioethics, and the most universally appealed to within recent legislation. There seems to be a consensus as to its value in research on autonomous persons, but also a problem concerning its application when dealing with people having a serious mental, social or even physical disability. Within the field of artificial procreation there are even more problems. Informed written consent is often demanded from anonymous donors of gametes in order to ensure their consent to the legal and moral consequences of their anonymity. The child resulting from the artificial procreation, on the contrary, cannot consent to, nor be informed before being conceived, of the secrecy laid on the identity of its genetic parents. Some countries resolve this problem by allowing the children, when they reach their majority, to obtain some information pertaining to the health or the identity of their genetic parents. This presents ethical problems. It can be argued that the anonymity of the parents chiefly affects the children, so that an agreement on this point among parents, doctors and others must be regarded as invalid. The paper will argue that a law ensuring the complete anonymity of the parents is disregarding the informed consent and the interests of the children resulting from artificial procreation, and is thus doing more damage to society than good.
PubMed ID
11654788 View in PubMed
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Are severe depressive symptoms associated with infertility-related distress in individuals and their partners?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106058
Source
Hum Reprod. 2014 Jan;29(1):76-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Brennan D Peterson
Camilla S Sejbaek
Matthew Pirritano
Lone Schmidt
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Psychology, Crean School of Health and Life Sciences, Chapman University, Orange, CA, USA.
Source
Hum Reprod. 2014 Jan;29(1):76-82
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Depression - complications
Depressive Disorder - complications
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Infertility - psychology - therapy
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Reproductive Techniques, Assisted - psychology
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Abstract
Are severe depressive symptoms in women and men associated with individual and dyadic infertility-related stress in couples undergoing infertility treatment?
Severe depressive symptoms were significantly associated with increased infertility-related distress at both the individual and partner level. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY?: An infertility diagnosis, the stress of medical treatments and a prior history of depression are risk factors for future depression in those undergoing fertility treatments. Studies examining the impact of severe depressive symptoms on infertility-related distress in couples are lacking.
This cross-sectional study included 1406 couples who were consecutively referred patients undergoing fertility treatments in Denmark in the year 2000. A total of 1049 men and 1131 women were included in the study.
Participants were consecutively referred patients undergoing a cycle of medically assisted reproduction treatment at five Danish public and private clinics specializing in treating fertility patients. Severe depressive symptoms were measured by the Mental Health Inventory 5 from the Short Form Health Survey 36. Infertility distress was measured by the COMPI Fertility Problem Stress Scales. Multilevel modelling using the actor-partner interdependence model was used to study the couple as the unit of analysis.
Severe depressive symptoms were reported in 11.6% of women and 4.3% of men, and were significantly associated with increased infertility-related distress at the individual and partner level. There was no significant interaction for gender indicating that men and women did not differ in how severe depressive symptoms were associated with infertility distress.
Because of the cross-sectional study design, the study findings only show an association between severe depressive symptoms to individual and partner distress at a single point in time; however, nothing is known about causality.
This study adds to the growing body of literature using the couple as the unit of analysis to study the relationship between depression and infertility distress. Recommendations for medical and mental health professionals that underscore the potential risk factors for depressed men and women who are pursuing infertility treatments are provided. Additional studies using a longitudinal study design to track the impact of depression on distress over the course of the infertility treatment cycle would be valuable for increasing our understanding of the complex relationship that exists between these psychosocial factors.
Authors Brennan Peterson and Matthew Pirritano have no financial disclosures for this study. Camilla Sandal Sejbaek and Lone Schmidt have received research grants from the Danish Health Insurance Foundation (J. nr. 2008B105) and Merck Sharp & Dohme. The funders had no influence on the data collection, analyses or conclusions of the study.
PubMed ID
24256990 View in PubMed
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Asking the inconceivable? Ethical and legal considerations regarding HIV-seropositive couples' request to access assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs): a Canadian perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159568
Source
Health Law J. 2008;16:237-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008

Assisted reproduction without assisting over-collection: fair information practices and the assisted human reproduction agency of Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153396
Source
Health Law J. 2009;17:229-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009

214 records – page 1 of 22.