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18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography for suspected recurrent papillary thyroid cancer: early experience at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153281
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2008 Oct;37(5):712-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Max Dahele
Yee C Ung
Lisa Ehrlich
Jay Silverberg
Judith Balogh
C Shun Wong
Author Affiliation
Departmentof Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Edmond Odette Cancer Centre,Toronto, Ontario.
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2008 Oct;37(5):712-7
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Cancer Care Facilities
Carcinoma, Papillary - pathology - radionuclide imaging - surgery
Cohort Studies
Female
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - diagnostic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - pathology - radionuclide imaging - surgery
Neoplasm Staging
Ontario
Positron-Emission Tomography - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Thyroglobulin - blood
Thyroid Neoplasms - pathology - radionuclide imaging - surgery
Thyroidectomy - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To report the initial experience with combined 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging for suspected recurrent papillary differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre (SHSC), Toronto.
Single institution retrospective study.
Consecutive patients from SHSC who underwent FDG PET/CT imaging for suspected recurrent DTC over a period of 2.5 years were identified and their charts reviewed.
Qualitative appraisal of FDG PET/CT imaging in suspected recurrent DTC.
Sixteen patients (14F, 2M) were identified accounting for 17 FDG PET/CT scans. Three scans (18%) in 3 different patients were reported as suspicious for recurrent disease in the neck (1-3 lesions) and were considered "positive". All were subsequently confirmed pathologically (4-13 positive lymph nodes post operatively). Prior conventional imaging was abnormal in two patients. Two patients had an elevated non-stimulated thyroglobulin (TG)
PubMed ID
19128681 View in PubMed
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Acarbose for the prevention of Type 2 diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular disease in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance: facts and interpretations concerning the critical analysis of the STOP-NIDDM Trial data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179962
Source
Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):969-75; discussion 976-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
J-L Chiasson
R G Josse
R. Gomis
M. Hanefeld
A. Karasik
M. Laakso
Author Affiliation
Research Centre, Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal-Hôtel-Dieu, Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, 3850 St. Urbain Street, Rm 8-202, Montreal, Quebec H2W 1T7, Canada. jean.louis.chiasson@umontreal.ca
Source
Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):969-75; discussion 976-7
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acarbose - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - chemistry
Body Weight - drug effects
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Clinical Protocols
Data Collection - ethics - methods
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Double-Blind Method
Eating - physiology
Ethics, Clinical
Fasting - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glucose Intolerance - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Risk Reduction Behavior
Stroke - classification - etiology - prevention & control
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Withholding Treatment - ethics
Abstract
The STOP-NIDDM Trial has shown that acarbose treatment in subjects with impaired glucose tolerance is associated with a significant risk reduction in the development of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular complications. Kaiser and Sawicki have accused the investigators of the STOP-NIDDM Trial of major biases in the conduct of the study, of manipulating the data and of conflict of interest. The aim of this paper is to present data and explanations refuting these allegations. In the STOP-NIDDM Trial, 61 subjects were excluded from the efficacy analysis before unblinding for legitimate reasons: failure to satisfy major entry criteria (n=17) and lack of post-randomisation data (n=44). Blinding and randomisation were carried out by an independent biostatistician. Titration of placebo/acarbose is well described in the protocol and in the study design paper. Of the study population, 9.3% had a fasting plasma glucose of > or =7.0 mmol/l at screening and could have been diabetic according to the new diagnostic criteria. However, even if these subjects are excluded, patients having acarbose treatment still saw a significant risk reduction in the development of diabetes (p=0.0027). The changes in weight are consistent in different publications and are related to different times of follow-up and assessment. Weight change does have an effect on the development of diabetes, but acarbose treatment is still effective even after adjusting for this (p=0.0063). The cardiovascular endpoints were a clearly designated assessment in the original protocol, and only those defined in the protocol and ascertained by the independent Cardiovascular Event Adjudication Committee were used in the analysis. Hypertension was defined according to the most recent diagnostic criteria. The STOP-NIDDM Trial results are scientifically sound and credible. The investigators stand strongly behind these results demonstrating that acarbose treatment is associated with a delay in the development of diabetes, hypertension and cardiovascular complications in a high-risk population with IGT.
Notes
Comment In: Diabetologia. 2004 Jun;47(6):976-715150689
Comment On: Diabetologia. 2004 Mar;47(3):575-8014727025
PubMed ID
15164169 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of remote results of eversion carotid endarterectomy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260751
Source
Angiol Sosud Khir. 2014;20(4):100-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
A V Pokrovskii
D F Beloiartsev
O L Talybly
Source
Angiol Sosud Khir. 2014;20(4):100-8
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Carotid Arteries - pathology
Carotid Stenosis - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology - surgery
Endarterectomy, Carotid - adverse effects - methods - statistics & numerical data
Female
Hemodynamics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Moscow
Postoperative Complications - classification - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke - etiology - prevention & control
Survival Rate
Treatment Outcome
Vascular Patency
Abstract
Analysed herein are remote results of surgical management of patients presenting with atherosclerotic stenoses of carotid arteries by means of eversion carotid endarterectomy. Over the period from 2002 to 2007 specialists of the Department of Vascular Surgery of the Institute of Surgery named after A.V. Vishnevsky under the RF Ministry of Public Health carried out a total of 393 eversion carotid endarterectomies in 356 patients. We assessed the remote results of 338 (86%) operations in 303 (85%) patients, analysing survival, freedom from stroke, patency of the reconstructed internal carotid artery and effects of risk factors on these indices. The average duration of follow-up amounted to 84 ± 31 months (max - 146 mos). A total of 242 (71.2%) patients survived. The cumulative 5-year survival rate amounted to 84%, with 10-year survival equalling 63%. Severity of the initial atherosclerotic lesion of the arterial bed, progression of atherosclerosis, and control over risk factors for atherosclerosis exerted a statistically significant influence on total survival. Acute disorders of cerebral circulation (of any localization) at a median follow-up of 81 ± 33 months (max - 146 mos) developed in 38 (12.1%) patients, of whom in 15 (4.8%) it terminated with a lethal outcome. Five-year cumulative freedom from stroke amounted to 92%, equalling 80% 10 years after. The risk factors which influenced the freedom from stroke included a history of acute impairments of cerebral circulation, restenoses of the reconstructed ipsilateral internal carotid artery (>70%), and diabetes mellitus. Amongst the examined by means of ultrasonography 164 patients, patency of the reconstructed ipsilateral internal carotid artery at an average follow-up of 75 ± 28 months (max - 135 mos) amounted to 95%. Haemodynamically significant restenoses (= 70%) were revealed in eight (5%) cases. Of these, three (2%) patients had narrowing of 70-89% and the remaining five (3%) patients had narrowing of = 90% (including 2 occlusions of the reconstructed ipsilateral internal carotid artery). We revealed no risk factors influencing the development of restenosis of the reconstructed ipsilateral internal carotid artery after eversion carotid endarterectomy. The obtained findings give grounds to consider eversion carotid endarterectomy as a safe and reliable method for treatment of atherosclerotic lesions of carotid arteries and, consequently, for prevention of stroke. Control of risk factors may improve remote results of surgical treatment.
PubMed ID
25490364 View in PubMed
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An international dosimetry exchange for BNCT part II: computational dosimetry normalizations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90266
Source
Med Phys. 2008 Dec;35(12):5419-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Riley K J
Binns P J
Harling O K
Albritton J R
Kiger W S
Rezaei A.
Sköld K.
Seppälä T.
Savolainen S.
Auterinen I.
Marek M.
Viererbl L.
Nievaart V A
Moss R L
Author Affiliation
Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.
Source
Med Phys. 2008 Dec;35(12):5419-25
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Boron - pharmacology
Boron Compounds - pharmacology
Boron Neutron Capture Therapy - methods - standards
Clinical Trials as Topic
Humans
Isotopes - pharmacology
Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Phantoms, Imaging
Phenylalanine - analogs & derivatives - pharmacology
Radiation-Sensitizing Agents - pharmacology
Radiometry - methods - statistics & numerical data
Radiotherapy Dosage
Radiotherapy Planning, Computer-Assisted - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Software
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The meaningful sharing and combining of clinical results from different centers in the world performing boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) requires improved precision in dose specification between programs. To this end absorbed dose normalizations were performed for the European clinical centers at the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Petten (The Netherlands), Nuclear Research Institute, Rez (Czech Republic), VTT, Espoo (Finland), and Studsvik, Nyköping (Sweden). Each European group prepared a treatment plan calculation that was bench-marked against Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) dosimetry performed in a large, water-filled phantom to uniformly evaluate dose specifications with an estimated precision of +/-2%-3%. These normalizations were compared with those derived from an earlier exchange between Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and MIT in the USA. Neglecting the uncertainties related to biological weighting factors, large variations between calculated and measured dose are apparent that depend upon the 10B uptake in tissue. Assuming a boron concentration of 15 microg g(-1) in normal tissue, differences in the evaluated maximum dose to brain for the same nominal specification of 10 Gy(w) at the different facilities range between 7.6 and 13.2 Gy(w) in the trials using boronophenylalanine (BPA) as the boron delivery compound and between 8.9 and 11.1 Gy(w) in the two boron sulfhydryl (BSH) studies. Most notably, the value for the same specified dose of 10 Gy(w) determined at the different participating centers using BPA is significantly higher than at BNL by 32% (MIT), 43% (VTT), 49% (JRC), and 74% (Studsvik). Conversion of dose specification is now possible between all active participants and should be incorporated into future multi-center patient analyses.
PubMed ID
19175101 View in PubMed
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[Aortic valve replacement with stentless bioprosthesis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275350
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2016;(5):4-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
D A Astapov
D P Demidov
E I Semenova
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2016;(5):4-12
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aortic Valve - surgery
Aortic Valve Stenosis - diagnosis - physiopathology - surgery
Bioprosthesis
Echocardiography - methods
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Heart Valve Prosthesis
Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation - adverse effects - methods
Hemodynamics
Humans
Male
Operative Time
Postoperative Complications - diagnosis - physiopathology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Prosthesis Design - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Siberia
Suture Techniques
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To evaluate prospectively the hemodynamic performance of «BioLAB Mono» stentless bioprosthesis implanted into aortic position.
Twenty seven patients (mean age 71 (67; 73); 17 women) with severe aortic stenosis underwent aortic valve replacement with «BioLAB Mono» stentless bioprosthesis from 2012 to 2014. The valves were implanted into supra-annular position using continuous polypropylene suture.
In the early postoperative period 1 patient (3.7%) died for acute heart failure. The mean aortic cross-clamping time was 81 (75; 90) min. Echocardiographic peak pressure gradient were 18 (16; 23) mmHg (postoperative). There were no cases of valve dysfunction in early postoperative period. Level of thrombocytes recovered after 10 days postoperatively.
«BioLAB Mono» aortic bioprosthesis implantation is easy and reproducible. The valve has excellent hemodynamic performance in early postoperative period.
PubMed ID
27271713 View in PubMed
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Assessing the Saskatchewan database for outcomes research studies of depression and its treatment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197545
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2000 Aug;53(8):823-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
S L West
A. Richter
C A Melfi
M. McNutt
M E Nennstiel
J A Mauskopf
Author Affiliation
Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2000 Aug;53(8):823-31
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Databases, Factual - standards
Depression - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Medical Records Systems, Computerized - standards
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Reproducibility of Results
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Sensitivity and specificity
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
This study was conducted to evaluate the validity of using the Saskatchewan Health administrative claims databases for conducting depression research. To develop a claims-based definition of depression, we identified a cohort of individuals who began a "new" period of antidepressant use (no use 180 days prior) from which we selected a stratified random sample (n = 600) for medical record abstraction. The medical record diagnosis was used as the gold standard for judging our database definitions of depression. After defining a primary database definition of depression, we tried to refine it using medically probable scenarios and assessed refinement by agreement statistics. Defining depression with ICD9 codes 296 (affective disorders), 309 (adjustment reaction), and 311 (depressive disorders), the sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive (PV+) and negative predictive (PV-) values were: 71%, 85%, 86%, and 70%, respectively. Algorithms that limited the number of false-negatives resulted in: Se = 84% and PV- = 77% whereas those that limited false-positives resulted in: Sp = 90% and PV+ = 86%. Although our depression definition requires treatment with antidepressants, this definition will allow us to conduct future studies of depression and its treatment using the Saskatchewan Health databases.
PubMed ID
10942865 View in PubMed
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Atypical ductal hyperplasia diagnosed at sonographically guided core needle biopsy: frequency, final surgical outcome, and factors associated with underestimation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104292
Source
AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2014 Jun;202(6):1389-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Benoît Mesurolle
Juan Carlos Hidalgo Perez
Fahad Azzumea
Emmanuelle Lemercier
Xuanqian Xie
Ann Aldis
Atilla Omeroglu
Sarkis Meterissian
Author Affiliation
1 All authors: Cedar Breast Clinic, McGill University Health Center, Royal Victoria Hospital, 687 Pine Ave W, Montreal, PQ, H3H 1A1 Canada.
Source
AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2014 Jun;202(6):1389-94
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biopsy, Large-Core Needle - statistics & numerical data
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Carcinoma, Intraductal, Noninfiltrating - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration - statistics & numerical data
False Negative Reactions
Female
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Precancerous Conditions - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - surgery
Quebec - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The purposes of this article were to review the mammographic and sonographic features of breast masses yielding atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) at sonographically guided biopsy, evaluate the surgical pathology outcome of these lesions, and determine whether clinical or imaging features can be used to predict upgrade to malignancy.
Among 6325 sonographically guided biopsies (2003- 2010) (14-gauge cores), 56 yielded the diagnosis of ADH (0.9%). Six patients were excluded (lost to follow-up). Fifty lesions were surgically excised in 45 patients. Mammographic and sonographic features were analyzed in consensus by two radiologists using the BI-RADS lexicon.
Forty-five patients (mean age, 56 years; 12
PubMed ID
24848840 View in PubMed
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Autologous fat transplantation to the velopharynx for treating persistent velopharyngeal insufficiency of mild degree secondary to overt or submucous cleft palate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117906
Source
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2013 Mar;66(3):337-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Charles Filip
Michael Matzen
Ingegerd Aagenæs
Ragnhild Aukner
Lillian Kjøll
Hans Erik Høgevold
Kim Tønseth
Author Affiliation
Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, PO Box 4950, Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway. cfilip@ous-hf.no
Source
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2013 Mar;66(3):337-44
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - transplantation
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Cleft Palate - complications - pathology - surgery
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Norway
Observer Variation
Prospective Studies
Reconstructive Surgical Procedures - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Speech Intelligibility
Transplantation, Autologous
Treatment Outcome
Velopharyngeal Insufficiency - etiology - physiopathology - surgery
Voice Quality
Young Adult
Abstract
Autologous fat transplantation to the velopharynx has been described in a few smaller studies including heterogeneous groups of patients for the treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). The aim of this study was to evaluate speech and to measure velopharyngeal closure with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients who underwent autologous fat transplantation for the treatment of persistent VPI of mild degree secondary to overt or submucous cleft palate.
A prospective study of 16 patients with persistent VPI of mild degree secondary to overt or submucous cleft palate who underwent autologous fat transplantation to the velopharynx. The patients were injected with a median of 5.6 (3.8-7.6) ml autologous fat to the velopharynx. Pre- and 1-year postoperative audio recordings were blinded for scoring independently by three senior speech therapists. Hypernasality, hyponasality, nasal turbulence and audible nasal emission were scored on a five-point scale. Pre- and 1-year postoperative MRIs were obtained during vocal rest and during phonation in 12 patients. Data measured were the velopharyngeal distance in the sagittal plane and the velopharyngeal gap area in the axial plane.
Hypernasality improved significantly (p=0.030), but not audible nasal emission (p=0.072) or nasal turbulence (p=0.12). The velopharyngeal distance during phonation decreased significantly (p=0.013), but not the velopharyngeal gap area (p=0.16). There was no significant correlation between speech and MRI results.
Autologous fat transplantation to the velopharynx improved hypernasality significantly, but not audible nasal emission or nasal turbulence in patients with persistent VPI of mild degree secondary to overt or submucous cleft palate. Given the low number of patients and the lack of a control group, the value of fat transplantation for the treatment of mild VPI is not proven for sure.
Notes
Comment In: J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2014 Aug;67(8):1155-624581953
PubMed ID
23254179 View in PubMed
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Body awareness rating questionnaire: measurement properties.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127494
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2012 Oct;28(7):515-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Dragesund Tove
Råheim Målfrid
Strand Liv Inger
Author Affiliation
Physiotherapy Research Group, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway. tove.dragesund@isf.uib.no
Source
Physiother Theory Pract. 2012 Oct;28(7):515-28
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Affect
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Awareness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Discriminant Analysis
Emotions
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Musculoskeletal Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Norway
Pain - diagnosis - physiopathology - prevention & control - psychology
Physical Therapy Modalities
Predictive value of tests
Psychometrics
Psychophysiologic Disorders - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Questionnaires
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of present study was to investigate important measurement properties of the Body Awareness Rating Questionnaire (BARQ) subscales: Function; Mood; Feelings; and Awareness. Samples of 50 patients with prolonged musculoskeletal pain and psychosomatic disorders, and 50 gender and age-matched healthy persons participated in the study. Relative (ICC 2,1) and absolute reliability (S(w)) were calculated. Construct validity was examined by testing hypothesis using Pearson (r) or Spearman rank (r(s)) correlation. Discriminate ability was examined using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, the area under the curve (aROC) being the measure of discriminative validity. All patients reported more or less improvement after treatment, using the Patient Global Impression of Change (PGIC) as an external indicator of important change. Responsiveness to important change was therefore examined by one-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), relating change scores of BARQ subscales to the PGIC categories. Relative and absolute reliability values were within recommended limits for all four subscales. Construct and discriminate validity was indicated for Function, Feelings and Awareness, but not for Mood. Responsiveness was indicated for the subscales Function and Awareness, but not for Feelings and Mood. Further research is needed to complement the subscales of BARQ, found with appropriate measurement properties.
PubMed ID
22288720 View in PubMed
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Can the painDETECT Questionnaire score and MRI help predict treatment outcome in rheumatoid arthritis: protocol for the Frederiksberg hospital's Rheumatoid Arthritis, pain assessment and Medical Evaluation (FRAME-cohort) study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264830
Source
BMJ Open. 2014;4(11):e006058
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Signe Rifbjerg-Madsen
Anton Wulf Christensen
Mikael Boesen
Robin Christensen
Bente Danneskiold-Samsøe
Henning Bliddal
Else Marie Bartels
Henning Locht
Kirstine Amris
Source
BMJ Open. 2014;4(11):e006058
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Chronic Pain
Cohort Studies
Contrast Media - diagnostic use
Denmark
Female
Hand Joints - drug effects - pathology
Hospitals - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Image Enhancement - methods
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - methods
Male
Pain Measurement - methods - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Pain in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is traditionally considered to be of inflammatory origin. Despite better control of inflammation, some patients still report pain as a significant concern, even when being in clinical remission. This suggests that RA may prompt central sensitisation-one aspect of chronic pain. In contrast, other patients report good treatment response, although imaging shows signs of inflammation, which could indicate a possible enhancement of descending pain inhibitory mechanisms. When assessing disease activity in patients with central sensitisation, the commonly used disease activity scores (eg, DAS28-CRP (C reactive protein)) will yield constant high total scores due to high tender joint count and global health assessments, whereas MRI provides an isolated estimate of inflammation. The objective of this study is, in patients with RA initiating anti-inflammatory treatment, to explore the prognostic value of a screening questionnaire for central sensitisation, hand inflammation assessed by conventional MRI, and the interaction between them regarding treatment outcome evaluated by clinical status (DAS28-CRP). For the purpose of further exploratory analyses, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is performed.
The painDETECT Questionnaire (PDQ), originally developed to screen for a neuropathic pain component, is applied to indicate the presence of central sensitisation. Adults diagnosed with RA are included when either (A) initiating disease-modifying antirheumatic drug treatment, or (B) initiating or switching to biological therapy. We anticipate that 100 patients will be enrolled, tested and reassessed after 4 months of treatment.
Clinical data, conventional MRI, DCE-MRI, blood samples and patient-reported outcomes.
This study aims at supporting rheumatologists to define strategies to reach optimal treatment outcomes in patients with RA based on chronic pain prognostics. The study has been approved by The Capital region of Denmark's Ethics Committee; identification number H-3-2013-049. The results will be published in international peer-reviewed journals.
Notes
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