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Classification of maltreatment-related mortality by Child Death Review teams: How reliable are they?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294461
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2017 05; 67:362-370
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
05-2017
Author
Jared W Parrish
Patricia G Schnitzer
Paul Lanier
Meghan E Shanahan
Julie L Daniels
Stephen W Marshall
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, Section of Women's, Children's, and Family Health 3601C?St., Suite 358, Anchorage, AK, United States; The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Injury Prevention Research Center, 137 East Franklin St, CB# 7505, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, United States. Electronic address: jared.parrish@alaska.gov.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2017 05; 67:362-370
Date
05-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Child Abuse - classification - ethnology - mortality
Child protective services
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Accurate estimation of the incidence of maltreatment-related child mortality depends on reliable child fatality review. We examined the inter-rater reliability of maltreatment designation for two Alaskan Child Death Review (CDR) panels. Two different multidisciplinary CDR panels each reviewed a series of 101 infant and child deaths (ages 0-4 years) in Alaska. Both panels independently reviewed identical medical, autopsy, law enforcement, child welfare, and administrative records for each death utilizing the same maltreatment criteria. Percent agreement for maltreatment was 64.7% with a weighted Kappa of 0.61 (95% CI 0.51, 0.70). Across maltreatment subtypes, agreement was highest for abuse (69.3%) and lowest for negligence (60.4%). Discordance was higher if the mother was unmarried or a smoker, if residence was rural, or if there was a family history of child protective services report(s). Incidence estimates did not depend on which panel's data were used. There is substantial room for improvement in the reliability of CDR panel assessment of maltreatment related mortality. Standardized decision guidance for CDR panels may improve the reliability of their data.
PubMed ID
28365427 View in PubMed
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Validity of histology for the diagnosis of paediatric coeliac disease: a Swedish multicentre study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277457
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2016;51(4):427-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Caroline Montén
Kaj Bjelkenkrantz
Audur H Gudjonsdottir
Lars Browaldh
Henrik Arnell
Åsa Torinsson Naluai
Daniel Agardh
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2016;51(4):427-33
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Biopsy
Celiac Disease - pathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Duodenum - pathology
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infant
Male
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE Histological evaluation of intestinal biopsies for the diagnosis of coeliac disease can be challenging and compatible with risk of misdiagnosis. The aim was to evaluate the agreement of pathological diagnosis for coeliac disease in children investigated at four major paediatric university hospitals in Sweden. MATERIALS AND METHODS Intestinal duodenal biopsies were collected from 402 children at median 9.7 years (1.4-18.3 years). A pathologist at each hospital performed the primary evaluation. A designated pathologist, blinded to the primary evaluation, performed a second Marsh classification of biopsies (M0 to M3c) taken from the bulb and duodenum separately. Kappa (?) scores between first and second evaluation determined the agreement. Plasma samples were collected at the day of intestinal biopsy and analysed for tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA) using radioligand-binding assays. RESULTS Marsh scores were concordant in 229/356 biopsies (64%, ? = 0.52, p
PubMed ID
26635075 View in PubMed
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Personality structure as derived from parental ratings of free descriptions of children: the inventory of child individual differences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182702
Source
J Pers. 2003 Dec;71(6):995-1026
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Charles F Halverson
Valerie L Havill
James Deal
Spencer R Baker
James B Victor
Vassilis Pavlopoulos
Elias Besevegis
Liu Wen
Author Affiliation
Department of Child and Family Development, The University of Georgia, Athens, 30602, USA. chalvers@fcs.uga.edu
Source
J Pers. 2003 Dec;71(6):995-1026
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Psychology
Child, Preschool
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Parent-Child Relations
Parents
Personality
Personality Development
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Temperament
Abstract
Based on over 50,000 parental descriptors of children gathered in eight different countries, we used a combination of focus group sorting of descriptors in each country and factor analyses of instruments developed in four of the countries (United States, China, Greece, and the Netherlands) to describe children ages 3 to 12 years to select items for an instrument that would work well across countries to access personality. Through many factor analyses of indigenous items in each country, a core set of 141 items was used in three of the countries, with over 3000 parents responding to our instruments in China, Greece, and the United States. Much cross-comparative research analysis has resulted in 15 robust midlevel scales that describe the structures of parental descriptors that are common to the three countries. The data on the English (U.S.) sample are presented in detail. Links to temperament and behavior problems are presented and discussed.
PubMed ID
14633056 View in PubMed
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A Swedish non-word repetition test for preschool children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82219
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2006 Jun;47(3):187-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Radeborg Karl
Barthelom Eleonora
Sjöberg Monika
Sahlén Birgitta
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Lund University, Sweden. karl.radeborg@psychology.lu.se
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2006 Jun;47(3):187-92
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Language Development
Language Tests
Male
Memory, Short-Term
Phonetics
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
A Swedish non-word repetition test for preschool children was constructed with the aim of measuring short-term phonological memory, which has been shown to correlate with language development and language proficiency. Normative data based on results for 200 children four to six years of age are presented. An item analysis of the original 30-item test resulted in a shortened 24 non-word version found suitable for four- to six-year old children. Results for this shortened version, which had a Cronbach's alpha of 0.73, showed longer non-words to be more difficult to repeat than shorter ones, and significant effects of age and compatibility of the tester's and the child's accent, but not of gender. The results are discussed within the framework of Baddeley's working memory model.
PubMed ID
16696842 View in PubMed
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Reliability of the strengths and difficulties questionnaire among Finnish 4-9-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126379
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;66(6):403-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Anne-Mari Borg
Pälvi Kaukonen
Raili Salmelin
Matti Joukamaa
Tuula Tamminen
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, School of Medicine, Department of Child Psychiatry, Finland.
Source
Nord J Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;66(6):403-13
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - psychology
Child, Preschool
Faculty
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Parents
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Early recognition of children's mental health problems calls for structured methods in front line services. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is a commonly used short questionnaire in screening child's mental difficulties.
To test the reliability and descriptive properties of the SDQ in a community sample of Finnish 4-9-year-old children (n =?4178).
Both parents, two teachers in day-care or a teacher at school completed the SDQ. To control for possible bias, public health nurses rated their concern about every child's mental health, including non-participants.
The internal consistencies of the SDQ total score in all informants' reports were satisfactory to good. Agreement (Spearman rho) in total scores between parents was 0.65, between parent and teacher 0.43 and between two teachers in day-care 0.81. The stability in parent's reports over 12 weeks was good. The distributions of the informant-rated scores indicated significant and clinically important gender differences, and the 80th and 90th percentiles were generally below the international cut-off points. Public health nurses reported emotional or behavioural difficulties more commonly in non-participants (12%) than in participants (7%; p
PubMed ID
22397524 View in PubMed
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Objective age of acquisition norms for a set of 286 words in Russian: relationships with other psycholinguistic variables.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116093
Source
Behav Res Methods. 2013 Dec;45(4):1208-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Andrei Grigoriev
Ivan Oshhepkov
Author Affiliation
Institute of Linguistics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow City University of Psychology and Education, Moscow, Russia, grigoriev.ran@gmail.com.
Source
Behav Res Methods. 2013 Dec;45(4):1208-17
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Language
Language Development
Language Tests
Male
Names
Psycholinguistics - methods
Recognition (Psychology)
Reproducibility of Results
Russia
Semantics
Vocabulary
Abstract
Normative data on the objective age of acquisition (AoA) for 286 Russian words are presented in this article. In addition, correlations between the objective AoA and subjective ratings, name agreement, picture name agreement, imageability, familiarity, word frequency, and word length are provided, as are correlations between the objective AoA and two measures of exemplar dominance (exemplar generation frequency and the number of times an exemplar was named first). The correlations between the aforementioned variables are generally consistent with the correlations reported in other normative studies. The objective AoA data are highly correlated with the subjective AoA ratings, whereas the correlations between the objective AoA and other psycholinguistic variables are moderate. The correlations between the objective AoA of Russian words and similar data for other languages are moderately high. The complete word norms may be downloaded from supplementary material.
PubMed ID
23435657 View in PubMed
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A confirmatory approach to examining the factor structure of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ): a large scale cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120411
Source
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2013 Apr;41(3):355-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Janni Niclasen
Anne Mette Skovgaard
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Mikael Julius Sømhovd
Carsten Obel
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Copenhagen, Ã?ster Farimagsgade 2A, 1353, Copenhagen K, Denmark. janni.niclasen@psy.ku.dk
Source
J Abnorm Child Psychol. 2013 Apr;41(3):355-65
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Psychometrics
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the factor structure of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) using a Structural Confirmatory Factor Analytic approach. The Danish translation of the SDQ was distributed to 71,840 parents and teachers of 5-7 and 10-12-year-old boys and girls from four large scale cohorts. Three theoretical models were examined: 1. a model with five first order factors (i.e., hyperactivity/inattention, conduct, emotional, peer problems and prosocial), 2. a model adding two internalising and externalising second order factors to model 1, and 3. a model adding a total difficulties second order factor to model 1. Model fits were evaluated, multi-group analyses were carried out and average variance extracted (AVE) and composite reliability (CR) estimates were examined. In this general population sample, low risk sample models 1 and 2 showed similar good overall fits. Best model fits were found when two positively worded items were allowed to cross load with the prosocial scale, and cross loadings were allowed for among three sets of indicators. The analyses also revealed that model fits were slightly better for teachers than for parents and better for older children than for younger children. No convincing differences were found between boys and girls. Factor loadings were acceptable for all groups, especially for older children rated by teachers. Some emotional, peer, conduct and prosocial subscale problems were revealed for younger children rated by parents. The analyses revealed more internal consistency for older children rated by teachers than for younger children rated by parents. It is recommended that model 1 comprising five first order factors, or alternatively model 2 with additionally two internalising/externalising second order factors, should be used when employing the SDQ in low risk epidemiological samples.
PubMed ID
23008011 View in PubMed
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Evaluating the accuracy of a geographic closed-ended approach to ethnicity measurement, a practical alternative.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256496
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;24(4):246-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Jessica A Omand
Sarah Carsley
Pauline B Darling
Patricia C Parkin
Catherine S Birken
Marcelo L Urquia
Marina Khovratovich
Jonathon L Maguire
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada; Keenan Research Centre of the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Canada. Electronic address: omandj@smh.ca.
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2014 Apr;24(4):246-53
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Censuses
Child, Preschool
Data Collection - methods
Ethnic Groups
Female
Humans
Infant
Mothers
Ontario
Prospective Studies
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report - standards
Abstract
Measuring ethnicity accurately is important for identifying ethnicity variations in disease risk. We evaluated the degree of agreement and accuracy of maternal ethnicity measured using the new standardized closed-ended geographically based ethnicity question and geographic reclassification of open-ended ethnicity questions from the Canadian census.
A prospectively designed study of respondent agreement of mothers of healthy children aged 1-5 years recruited through the TARGet Kids! practice-based research network. For the primary analysis, the degree of agreement between geographic reclassification of the Canadian census maternal ethnicity variables and the new geographically based closed-ended maternal ethnicity variable completed by the same respondent was evaluated using a kappa analysis.
Eight hundred sixty-two mothers who completed both measures of ethnicity were included in the analysis. The kappa agreement statistic for the two definitions of maternal ethnicity was 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.84-0.90) indicating good agreement. Overall accuracy of the measurement was 93%. Sensitivity and specificity ranged from 83% to 100% and 96% to 100%, respectively.
The new standardized closed-ended geographically based ethnicity question represents a practical alternative to widely used open-ended ethnicity questions. It may reduce risk of misinterpretation of ethnicity by respondents, simplify analysis, and improve the accuracy of ethnicity measurement.
PubMed ID
24529516 View in PubMed
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Verifying a questionnaire diagnosis of asthma in children using health claims data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129431
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2011;11:52
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Connie L Yang
Teresa To
Richard G Foty
David M Stieb
Sharon D Dell
Author Affiliation
Division of Respiratory Medicine, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada.
Source
BMC Pulm Med. 2011;11:52
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Insurance Claim Reporting
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Urban Population
Abstract
Childhood asthma prevalence is widely measured by parental proxy report of physician-diagnosed asthma in questionnaires. Our objective was to validate this measure in a North American population.
The 2884 study participants were a subsample of 5619 school children aged 5 to 9 years from 231 schools participating in the Toronto Child Health Evaluation Questionnaire study in 2006. We compared agreement between "questionnaire diagnosis" and a previously validated "health claims data diagnosis". Sensitivity, specificity and kappa were calculated for the questionnaire diagnosis using the health claims diagnosis as the reference standard.
Prevalence of asthma was 15.7% by questionnaire and 21.4% by health claims data. Questionnaire diagnosis was insensitive (59.0%) but specific (95.9%) for asthma. When children with asthma-related symptoms were excluded, the sensitivity increased (83.6%), and specificity remained high (93.6%).
Our results show that parental report of asthma by questionnaire has low sensitivity but high specificity as an asthma prevalence measure. In addition, children with "asthma-related symptoms" may represent a large fraction of under-diagnosed asthma and they should be excluded from the inception cohort for risk factor studies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22108202 View in PubMed
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Discriminative validity of the Danish version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141312
Source
Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2011 Feb;31(1):78-89
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Michelle Stahlhut
Gunvor Gard
Mette Aadahl
Jette Christensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. michelle.stahlhut@gmail.com
Source
Phys Occup Ther Pediatr. 2011 Feb;31(1):78-89
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis, Juvenile
Cerebral Palsy
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Disability Evaluation
Disabled Children
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Parents
Questionnaires
ROC Curve
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) assesses functional status in children with disabilities aged 0.5-7.5 years. The purpose of this study was to examine if the Danish version of the PEDI was able to discriminate between nondisabled children and children with cerebral palsy (CP) or juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Convenience sampling was used to select the clinical samples that consisted of 22 children with CP and 14 children with JIA aged 1.5-7.5 years. An additional sample, consisting of 224 nondisabled children aged 1.0-5.9 years, was obtained on the basis of random sampling. The PEDI was administered as a questionnaire completed by the parents. Results from receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis showed that in the case of discrimination between children with CP and nondisabled children, the sensitivity and specificity were 77.3 and 97.8%, respectively. In the discrimination between children with JIA and nondisabled children, the sensitivity and specificity were 99.8 and 81.7%, respectively. Study results indicate that the Danish version of the PEDI shows good discriminative validity. Further studies of the discriminative validity are recommended.
PubMed ID
20735194 View in PubMed
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337 records – page 2 of 34.