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Validity and reliability testing of the Swedish version of Melbourne Decision Making Questionnaire.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264344
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2014 Jun;28(2):405-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Ulf Isaksson
Senada Hajdarevic
Lena Jutterström
Åsa Hörnsten
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2014 Jun;28(2):405-12
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decision Making
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Translating
Abstract
The Melbourne Decision-Making Questionnaire (MDMQ) is an attempt to capture and measure coping strategies that people use. The instrument had not previously been translated into Swedish. The aim of this study was to evaluate validity and reliability of the Swedish version of the MDMQ.
A Swedish translation was performed and back-translated. A group of five pilot readers evaluated content validity. The translated questionnaire was tested among 735 patients, healthcare workers, healthcare students and teachers. A parallel analysis (PA), exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were performed.
An initial EFA with a four-factor solution showed a low concordance with the original 22-item four-factor model with a very low Cronbach's alpha in one of the dimensions. However, a second EFA with a three-factor solution showed a good model fit for the Swedish translation of the Melbourne Decision-Making Questionnaire (MDMQ-S) with a satisfactory Cronbach's alpha. A CFA showed a goodness of fit after deleting six items.
After testing the MDMQ-S, we found support for validity and reliability of the instrument. We found the 16-item version of MDMQ-S to be satisfactory concerning the subscales vigilance, procrastination and buck-passing. However, we found no support that the hypervigilance dimension could be measured by the MDMQ-S.
PubMed ID
23647465 View in PubMed
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Commentary on the paper "reliability and validity of the Swedish version of the Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS)".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168251
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2006 Jun;13(2):133-4; author reply 134
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Ingvild Kjeken
Hanne Dagfinrud
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2006 Jun;13(2):133-4; author reply 134
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Fatigue - diagnosis
Humans
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Notes
Comment On: Scand J Occup Ther. 2005 Dec;12(4):170-8016457090
PubMed ID
16856470 View in PubMed
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The communicative and critical health literacy scale--Swedish version.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107745
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Feb;42(1):25-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2014
Author
Josefin M Wångdahl
Lena I Mårtensson
Author Affiliation
1Social Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2014 Feb;42(1):25-31
Date
Feb-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Health Literacy
Humans
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Translating
Abstract
Health literacy (HL) is an important determinant for health and a valuable health indicator within public health. As such, it is a significant outcome variable of health promotion efforts. Valid and reliable instruments are needed to evaluate health promotion interventions and to assess levels of HL in a population. One of the few measurements of communicative and critical HL is the Japanese Communicative and Critical Health Literacy scale (C & C HL scale). To make it possible to use this instrument in Sweden, the C & C HL scale was translated into Swedish and different aspects of validity, including test-retest reliability, of the translated version were tested.
After translation and back-translation, The Swedish C & C HL scale was tested for content validity and test-retest reliability. Data were collected from a committee consisting of public health experts and bilingual people, and from a test group of 35 persons.
The Swedish C & C HL scale was understandable and showed evidence of content validity. The test-retest confirmed that it was stable over time, percentage agreements for the items ranging from 66% to 89% (M = 74%).
The Swedish C & C HL scale is equivalent to the Japanese C & C HL scale in terms of language and content. The items cover the major aspects of communicative and critical HL and are understandable and stable over time, i.e., reliable.
PubMed ID
23982461 View in PubMed
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Behavioral Pain Scale - translation, reliability, and validity in a Swedish context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278023
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2016 Jul;60(6):821-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
M. Hylén
E. Akerman
C. Alm-Roijer
E. Idvall
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2016 Jul;60(6):821-8
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Critical Illness
Humans
Pain
Pain Measurement
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
Assessing pain in the intensive care unit (ICU) is challenging. Due to intubation and sedation, communication can be limited. International guidelines recommend assessing pain with instruments based on behavioral parameters when critically ill patients are unable to self-report their pain level. One of the recommended instruments, the Behavioral Pain Scale (BPS), has shown good validity and reliability in international studies. The aim of this study was to translate and adapt the BPS for critically ill intubated and non-intubated patients in a Swedish ICU context and to assess inter-rater reliability and discriminant validity.
The BPS (both for intubated and non-intubated patients) was translated and adapted into Swedish using a translation method consisting of ten steps. The Swedish version was then tested for inter-rater reliability and discriminant validity on 20 critically ill patients (10 intubated and 10 non-intubated) before and directly after a potentially painful procedure (repositioning).
The Swedish version of the BPS showed inter-rater reliability with a percentage agreement of 85% when tested on a sample of critically ill patients. The instrument also showed discriminant validity between assessments at rest and after repositioning.
Results of the Swedish version of the BPS support its use in critically ill patients who cannot self-report their pain level. Still, additional studies are needed to further explore its reliability and validity in the Swedish ICU context.
Notes
Comment On: Intensive Care Med. 2009 Dec;35(12):2060-719697008
Comment On: Crit Care Med. 2001 Dec;29(12):2258-6311801819
Comment On: Intensive Crit Care Nurs. 2006 Feb;22(1):32-916198570
PubMed ID
27251598 View in PubMed
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Research that Guides Practice: Outcome Research in Swedish PhD Theses Across Seven Disciplines 1997-2012.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278960
Source
Prev Sci. 2016 May;17(4):525-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2016
Author
Tina M Olsson
Knut Sundell
Source
Prev Sci. 2016 May;17(4):525-32
Date
May-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Evidence-Based Practice
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
The core of evidence-based practice (EBP) as advocated for within the practice arms of the health and social sciences is to promote the routine incorporation of the best available research evidence into practice efforts. This requires discipline-specific education that is not only grounded in professional practice but also prepares would-be scientists in the application of the sophisticated techniques that characterize today's high research standards. Doctoral-level education is an important primer for future scientific endeavors across disciplines. This study examined 2334 theses published across Sweden in public health, criminology, nursing, psychiatry, psychology, social work, and sociology during the period 1997-2012. Of the theses reviewed, 13% aimed to investigate the effects of interventions. The highest percentage of effectiveness studies was found in nursing, public health, and psychology. The percentage of outcome research increased during the period. Controlled studies (with comparison group and pre- and post-test) occurred primarily within public health, nursing, psychiatry, and psychology. Of the 296 theses that included an intervention effectiveness study, 131 (44%), or 5.6% of all theses reviewed, met all four assessment criteria for quality. PhD education across seven disciplines in Sweden may be producing a professional core of scientists that is ill prepared to produce the type of research that is necessary to inform practice of the effects of its interventions as exposure to the rigors of quality effectiveness research is all but non-existent. This has implications for the advancement of an evidence-based practice and intervention science more broadly.
PubMed ID
26898510 View in PubMed
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Swedish translation and validation of the international skin tear advisory panel skin tear classification system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299875
Source
Int Wound J. 2019 Feb; 16(1):13-18
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Ulrika Källman
Le Blanc Kimberly
Carina Bååth
Author Affiliation
Research and Development Department, South Älvsborg Hospital, Borås, Sweden.
Source
Int Wound J. 2019 Feb; 16(1):13-18
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Humans
Lacerations - classification
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Skin - injuries
Sweden
Translations
Abstract
The aims of this study were to translate the International Skin Tear Advisory Panel (ISTAP) classification system for skin tears into Swedish and to validate the translated system. The research process consisted of two phases. Phase I involved the translation of the classification system, using the forward-back translation method, and a consensus survey. The survey dictated that the best Swedish translation for "skin tear" was "hudfliksskada." In Phase 2, the classification system was validated by health care professionals attending a wound care conference held in the spring of 2017 in Sweden. Thirty photographs representing three types of skin tear were presented to participants in random order. Participants were directed to classify the skin tear types in a data collection sheet. The results indicated a moderate level of agreement on classification of skin tears by type. Achieving moderate agreement for the ISTAP skin tear tool is an important milestone as it demonstrates the validity and reliability of the tool. Skin tear classification typing is a complex skill that requires training and time to develop. More education is required for all health care specialists on the classification of skin tears.
PubMed ID
30191655 View in PubMed
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Research Brief: Swedish Translation and Reliability of the Full Outline of Unresponsiveness Score.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286754
Source
J Neurosci Nurs. 2016 Jul-Aug;48(4):206
Publication Type
Article
Author
Wendy R Miller
Source
J Neurosci Nurs. 2016 Jul-Aug;48(4):206
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Glasgow Coma Scale
Humans
Intensive Care Units
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
PubMed ID
27362620 View in PubMed
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Exploring inter-rater reliability and measurement properties of environmental ratings using kappa and colocation quotients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260950
Source
Environ Health. 2014;13:86
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Jonas Björk
Ralf Rittner
Ellen Cromley
Source
Environ Health. 2014;13:86
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environment
Health Surveys
Humans
Perception
Reproducibility of Results
Residence Characteristics
Sweden
Abstract
Available evidence suggest that perceptions or ratings of the neighborhood, e.g. as being green, walkable or noisy, are important for effects on health and wellbeing, also after controlling for objective measures of identical or similar features. When evaluating effects of the perceived environment, it is important that measurement properties and the reliability of the environmental ratings are evaluated before decisions about how these ratings should be handled in the statistical analyses are made. In this paper we broaden the usage of two association measures, the well-known kappa statistic and the novel colocation quotient (CLQ), to studies of inter-rater reliability and of associations between different categorical ratings in spatial contexts.
We conducted reliability analysis of a survey instrument for assessing perceived greenness at geographical point locations, here the close outdoor environment within 5-10 minutes walking distance from home. Data were obtained from a public health survey conducted in 2008 in Scania, southern Sweden (n =27 967 participants).
The results demonstrate the usefulness of kappa and CLQ as tools for assessing reliability and measurement properties of environmental rating scales when used at geographical point locations. We further show that the two measures are interchangeable, i.e. kappa can be accurately approximated from CLQ and vice versa, but can be used for somewhat different purposes in reliability analyses. Inter-rater reliability between the nearest neighbors was demonstrated for all five items of the evaluated instrument for assessing perceived greenness, albeit with clear differences across the items.
Reliability analysis employing kappa and CLQ can be used as a basis for informed decisions about, for instance, how dichotomizations of the ratings should be defined and how missing or indefinite ratings should be handled. Such reliability analyses can thus serve as guidance for subsequent epidemiological studies of associations between environmental ratings, health and wellbeing.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25342232 View in PubMed
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Doubtful outcome of the validation of the Rome II questionnaire: validation of a symptom based diagnostic tool.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146457
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2009;7:106
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Herdis K M Molinder
Lars Kjellström
Henry B O Nylin
Lars E Agréus
Author Affiliation
Centre for Family and Community Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Nobels Allé 12, 141 52 Huddinge, Sweden. herdis.molinder@ki.se
Source
Health Qual Life Outcomes. 2009;7:106
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Colonoscopy
Gastrointestinal Diseases - diagnosis
Humans
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Translations
Abstract
Questionnaires are used in research and clinical practice. For gastrointestinal complaints the Rome II questionnaire is internationally known but not validated. The aim of this study was to validate a printed and a computerized version of Rome II, translated into Swedish. Results from various analyses are reported.
Volunteers from a population based colonoscopy study were included (n = 1011), together with patients seeking general practice (n = 45) and patients visiting a gastrointestinal specialists' clinic (n = 67). The questionnaire consists of 38 questions concerning gastrointestinal symptoms and complaints. Diagnoses are made after a special code. Our validation included analyses of the translation, feasibility, predictability, reproducibility and reliability. Kappa values and overall agreement were measured. The factor structures were confirmed using a principal component analysis and Cronbach's alpha was used to test the internal consistency.
Translation and back translation showed good agreement. The questionnaire was easy to understand and use. The reproducibility test showed kappa values of 0.60 for GERS, 0.52 for FD, and 0.47 for IBS. Kappa values and overall agreement for the predictability when the diagnoses by the questionnaire were compared to the diagnoses by the clinician were 0.26 and 90% for GERS, 0.18 and 85% for FD, and 0.49 and 86% for IBS. Corresponding figures for the agreement between the printed and the digital version were 0.50 and 92% for GERS, 0.64 and 95% for FD, and 0.76 and 95% for IBS. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for GERS was 0.75 with a span per item of 0.71 to 0.76. For FD the figures were 0.68 and 0.54 to 0.70 and for IBS 0.61 and 0.56 to 0.66. The Rome II questionnaire has never been thoroughly validated before even if diagnoses made by the Rome criteria have been compared to diagnoses made in clinical practice.
The accuracy of the Swedish version of the Rome II is of doubtful value for clinical practice and research. The results for reproducibility and reliability were acceptable but the outcome of the predictability test was poor with IBS as an exception. The agreement between the digital and the paper questionnaire was good.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20040091 View in PubMed
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Translation and validation of the wound-specific quality of life instrument Cardiff Wound Impact Schedule in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264346
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2014 Jun;28(2):398-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Ann-Mari Fagerdahl
Lennart Boström
Johanna Ulfvarson
Gunnar Bergström
Carin Ottosson
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2014 Jun;28(2):398-404
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Wounds and Injuries - therapy
Abstract
To translate and validate the wound-specific health-related quality of life instrument, the Cardiff Wound Impact Schedule (CWIS) in a Swedish population.
The instrument was first translated into Swedish, using the Standard Linguistic Validation Process. The Swedish version of the CWIS was then tested for its psychometric properties in a Swedish context. A total of 117 patients with acute and hard-to-heal wounds were included. The patients were asked to fill in the Swedish version of the CWIS and the generic instrument SF-36 at baseline and after 1 week. Patients with acute wounds were also asked to fill in both instruments after 6 weeks.
Face validity and content validity were assessed by patients and an expert group, and judged as good. Criterion validity was calculated with correlation between CWIS and SF-36, reaching moderate to high values. Reliability of the three domains of the CWIS measured with internal consistency and test-retest stability was acceptable to excellent. Internal responsiveness was assessed with standardised response mean and showed moderate to high sensitivity.
This study concludes that the Swedish version of CWIS is a valid and reliable tool for measuring health-related quality of life in patients with acute and hard-to-heal wounds.
PubMed ID
23639055 View in PubMed
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931 records – page 1 of 94.