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812 records – page 1 of 82.

[Standardization system for health services of the Russian Federation. Guidelines for assessment of analytical reliability of clinical laboratory tests (precision, sensitivity, specificity)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177990
Source
Klin Lab Diagn. 2004 Jul;(7):42-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Source
Klin Lab Diagn. 2004 Jul;(7):42-6
Date
Jul-2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - standards
Humans
Reproducibility of Results
Russia
Sensitivity and specificity
PubMed ID
15478237 View in PubMed
Less detail

Validity of a questionnaire survey: the role of non-response and incorrect answers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75771
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1999 Oct;57(5):242-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
O. Sjöström
D. Holst
S O Lind
Author Affiliation
The Bohus County Council, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1999 Oct;57(5):242-6
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Dental Health Surveys
Humans
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
Errors in questionnaire surveys are usually of one of two sources: non-responses or incorrect answers. The aim was to investigate the validity of a questionnaire survey and to estimate the respective bias of these answers. Of 9,283 subjects selected to receive a questionnaire by post, 3,949 (43%) responded, and, of these, 3,400 correctly reported their Swedish social security number. Answers in the questionnaire survey were given as proportions of the claims registered at local insurance offices. In the group of respondents who had correctly reported their social security number, the answers were compared individually with the registrations in dental insurance claims. In Sweden, these claims are labeled with the patient's social security number and it is thereby possible to make such comparisons. It was shown that errors were caused by non-response and also by respondents giving incorrect answers. Incorrect answers accounted for approximately one-third of the total bias. The remaining bias was caused by a non-response error. It is concluded that questionnaire studies have a bias caused by both non-response and incorrect answers and that together these can be substantial. Scientific reports that include questionnaire surveys must describe the procedure carefully. If possible, other sources of information should be considered.
PubMed ID
10614900 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1991 Oct;12(10):622-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1991
Author
D. Birnbaum
S B Sheps
Author Affiliation
Applied Epidemiology, Sidney, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 1991 Oct;12(10):622-4
Date
Oct-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Diagnosis
Humans
Predictive value of tests
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
PubMed ID
1787311 View in PubMed
Less detail

External quality assurance model for improvement of specificity and accuracy of serum hormone determinations in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature103877
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 1990;95(3):257-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
A. Ruokonen
P. Hyltoft-Petersen
O. Blaabjerg
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Oulun Yliopisto, Finland.
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 1990;95(3):257-8
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chemistry, Clinical - standards
Hormones - blood
Humans
Quality Control
Reproducibility of Results
Scandinavia
Sensitivity and specificity
PubMed ID
2100403 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Clinical laboratory immunology: the analytical, medical and technical aspects].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204890
Source
Klin Lab Diagn. 1998 Jun;(6):23-4, 33-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1998

Differences in 12-lead electrocardiogram between symptomatic and asymptomatic Brugada syndrome patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86975
Source
J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2008 Apr;19(4):380-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Junttila M Juhani
Brugada Pedro
Hong Kui
Lizotte Eric
DE Zutter Marc
Sarkozy Andrea
Brugada Josep
Benito Begona
Perkiomaki Juha S
Mäkikallio Timo H
Huikuri Heikki V
Brugada Ramon
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland. mattiju@mail.student.oulu.fi
Source
J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol. 2008 Apr;19(4):380-3
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brugada Syndrome - classification - diagnosis
Electrocardiography - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited disorder that predisposes some subjects to sudden cardiac death (SCD). It is not well established which BrS patients are at risk of severe arrhythmias. Our aim was to study whether standard 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) would give useful information for this purpose. METHODS: This study included 200 BrS probands (142 male, 62%; mean age 42 +/- 16 years). Symptoms related to BrS were defined as syncope, documented ventricular tachyarrhythmia, or SCD. We determined PR, QRS, QTc, T(peak), and T(end) interval from leads II and V(2) and QRS from lead V(5), R'/S ratio from lead aVR (aVR sign), QRS axis, and J-point elevation amplitude from right precordial leads from the baseline ECGs. RESULTS: Sixty-six subjects (33%) had experienced symptoms related to BrS. The only significant difference between the symptomatic and asymptomatic BrS subjects was the QRS duration measured from lead II or lead V(2), for example, the mean QRS in V(2) was 115 +/- 26 ms in symptomatic versus 104 +/- 19 ms in asymptomatic patients (P or =120 ms gave an odds ratio (OR) of 2.5 (95% CI: 1.4-4.6, P = 0.003) for being symptomatic. In a multivariate analysis adjusted with gender, age, and SCN5A mutation, the OR was 2.6 (95% CI: 1.4-4.8, P = 0.004). CONCLUSION: Prolonged QRS duration, measured from standard 12-lead ECG, is associated with symptoms and could serve as a simple noninvasive risk marker of vulnerability to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in BrS.
PubMed ID
18081770 View in PubMed
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Validity of the 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire in detecting depression in the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281016
Source
Public Health. 2016 Jul;136:66-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2016
Author
A. Lundin
M. Hallgren
H. Theobald
C. Hellgren
M. Torgén
Source
Public Health. 2016 Jul;136:66-74
Date
Jul-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Abstract
The 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) is frequently used to measure common mental disorder in public health surveys, but few population-based validations have been made. We validated the GHQ-12 against structured psychiatric interviews of depression using a population-based cohort in Stockholm, Sweden.
We used a population-based cohort of 484 individuals in Stockholm, Sweden (participation rate 62%). All completed the GHQ-12 and a semi-structured psychiatric interview. Last month DSM-III-R symptoms were used to classify major and minor depression. Three scoring methods for GHQ-12 were assessed, the Standard, Likert and Corrected method. Discriminatory ability was assessed with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve.
A total of 9.5% had a major or minor depression. The area under the ROC curve was for the Standard method 0.73 (0.65-0.82), the Likert method 0.80 (0.72-0.87) and the Corrected method 0.80 (0.73-0.87) when using major or minor depression as standard criterion. Adequate sensitivity and specificity for separating those with or without a depressive disorder was reached at =12 Likert scored points (80.4 and 69.6%) or =6 Corrected GHQ points (78.3 and 73.7%). Sensitivity and specificity was at =2 Standard scored points 67.4% and 74.2%.
When scored using the Likert and Corrected methods, the GHQ-12 performed excellently. When scored using the Standard method, performance was acceptable in detecting depressive disorder in the general population. The GHQ-12 appears to be a good proxy for depressive disorder when used in public health surveys.
PubMed ID
27040911 View in PubMed
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[Using characteristic numbers to estimate the usefulness of laboratory tests for diagnosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179794
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(8):935-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Matti Uhari
Author Affiliation
Oulun yliopiston lastentautien klinikka PL 5000, 90014 Oulun yliopisto. matti.uhari@oulu.fi
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(8):935-41
Date
2004
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures - economics - standards
Finland
Humans
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Unnecessary Procedures
PubMed ID
15185506 View in PubMed
Less detail

The origin of monitoring of acute myocardial infarction with continuous vectorcardiography.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267290
Source
J Electrocardiol. 2014 Jul-Aug;47(4):418-24
Publication Type
Article
Author
Magnus Sederholm
Source
J Electrocardiol. 2014 Jul-Aug;47(4):418-24
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted - methods
Humans
Myocardial Infarction - diagnosis
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Sweden
Vectorcardiography - methods
Abstract
The continuous change of the ST and QRS vectorcardiograms reflect the underlying ischemic event, and can be used as a tool in the management of the acute event. It also reflects reperfusion, and can guide the clinician on when and how to intervene. Continuous vectorcardiography has proven to add prognostic information, both in the acute phase (can be used already in the ambulance during transportation to CCU) and after discharge from hospital. This paper reviews the origin of continous vectorcardiography as a monitoring device in AMI, including the follow-up research until today.
PubMed ID
24878031 View in PubMed
Less detail

Quality assessment of cyclosporine monitoring by 32 Canadian laboratories.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226858
Source
Clin Biochem. 1991 Feb;24(1):59-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1991
Author
P Y Wong
A V Mee
J. Glenn
P A Keown
Author Affiliation
Toronto Hospital, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Clin Biochem. 1991 Feb;24(1):59-62
Date
Feb-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cyclosporins - blood
Humans
Laboratories - standards
Monitoring, Physiologic - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The Canadian Quality Assurance Program was initiated in June 1989, and is a voluntary program which currently encompasses all 32 laboratories involved in the measurement of cyclosporine (CsA) across Canada. Two whole blood samples from control or clinical patients (kidney, liver and heart) containing unknown concentrations of CsA are circulated to each participating laboratory monthly, and analyzed by all techniques employed within that laboratory. Four analytical methods are currently employed: HPLC (n = 4). Sandimmun SP (n = 3), CycloTrac SP (n = 27) and TDx (n = 3). Four laboratories reported survey results in more than one methodology. Results from all participating centers are analyzed monthly. The mean, SD, standard deviation index and range are reported to each laboratory with information coded to preserve confidentiality. Accuracy, precision, recovery, analytical specificity, linearity and blank studies have been performed. This report covers the period from June 1989 to April 1990.
PubMed ID
2060134 View in PubMed
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812 records – page 1 of 82.