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Older adult mistreatment risk screening: contribution to the validation of a screening tool in a domestic setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123904
Source
Can J Aging. 2012 Jun;31(2):235-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Jeannette M Lindenbach
Sylvie Larocque
Anne-Marise Lavoie
Marie-Luce Garceau
Author Affiliation
Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. jm_lindenbach@laurentian.ca
Source
Can J Aging. 2012 Jun;31(2):235-52
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Elder Abuse - diagnosis
Humans
Language
Mass Screening - instrumentation
Ontario
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Abstract
ABSTRACTThe hidden nature of older adult mistreatment renders its detection in the domestic setting particularly challenging. A validated screening instrument that can provide a systematic assessment of risk factors can facilitate this detection. One such instrument, the "expanded Indicators of Abuse" tool, has been previously validated in the Hebrew language in a hospital setting. The present study has contributed to the validation of the "e-IOA" in an English-speaking community setting in Ontario, Canada. It consisted of two phases: (a) a content validity review and adaptation of the instrument by experts throughout Ontario, and (b) an inter-rater reliability assessment by home visiting nurses. The adaptation, the "Mistreatment of Older Adult Risk Factors" tool, offers a comprehensive tool for screening in the home setting. This instrument is significant to professional practice as practitioners working with older adults will be better equipped to assess for risk of mistreatment.
PubMed ID
22647665 View in PubMed
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Reproducibility of an extensive self-report questionnaire used in secondary coronary prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283790
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 May;45(3):269-276
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Peersen
Munkhaugen
Gullestad
Dammen
Moum
Otterstad
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 May;45(3):269-276
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Norway
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Secondary Prevention
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Self-reported information from questionnaires is frequently used in clinical epidemiological studies, but few provide information on the reproducibility of instruments applied in secondary coronary prevention studies. This study aims to assess the test-retest reproducibility of the questionnaire applied in the cross-sectional NORwegian CORonary (NOR-COR) Prevention Study.
In the NOR-COR study 1127 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients completed a self-report questionnaire consisting of 249 questions, of which there are both validated instruments and de novo questions. Test-retest reliability of the instrument was estimated after four weeks in 99 consecutive coronary patients. Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and Kappa (?) were calculated.
The mean interval between test and retest was 33 (±6.4) days. Reproducibility values for questions in the first part of the questionnaire did not differ from those in the latter. A good to very good reproducibility was found for lifestyle factors (smoking: ? = 1.0; exercise: ICC = 0.90), medical factors (drug adherence: ICC = 0.74; sleep apnoea: ICC = 0.87), and psychosocial factors (anxiety and depression: ICC = 0.95; quality of life 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF12): ICC = 0.89), as well as for the majority of de-novo-created variables covering the patient's perceptions, motivation, needs, and preferences.
The present questionnaire demonstrates a highly acceptable reproducibility for all key items and instruments. It thus emerges as a valuable tool for evaluating patient factors associated with coronary risk factor control in CHD patients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28181463 View in PubMed
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Issues in evaluating fish consumption rates for Native American tribes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155174
Source
Risk Anal. 2008 Dec;28(6):1497-506
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Jamie Donatuto
Barbara L Harper
Author Affiliation
Swinomish Indian Trial Community, Office of Planning and Community Development, La Conner, WA 98257, USA. Jdonatuto@swinomish.nsn.us
Source
Risk Anal. 2008 Dec;28(6):1497-506
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cultural Characteristics
Data Collection - methods
Diet
Fishes
Humans
Indians, North American
Nutritional Sciences
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Abstract
The environmental health goals of many Native American tribes are to restore natural resources and ensure that they are safe to harvest and consume in traditional subsistence quantities. Therefore, it is important to tribes to accurately estimate risks incurred through the consumption of subsistence foods. This article explores problems in conventional fish consumption survey methods used in widely cited tribal fish consumption reports. The problems arise because of the following: (1) widely cited reports do not clearly state what they intend to do with the data supporting these reports, (2) data collection methods are incongruent with community norms and protocols, (3) data analysis methods omit or obscure the highest consumer subset of the population, (4) lack of understanding or recognition of tribal health co-risk factors, and (5) restrictive policies that do not allow inclusion of tribal values within state or federal actions. In particular, the data collection and analysis methods in current tribal fish consumption surveys result in the misunderstanding that tribal members are satisfied with eating lower contemporary amounts of fish and shellfish, rather than the subsistence amounts that their cultural heritage and aboriginal rights indicate. A community-based interview method developed in collaboration with and used by the Swinomish Tribe is suggested as a way to gather more accurate information on contemporary consumption rates. For traditional subsistence rates, a multidisciplinary reconstruction method is recommended.
PubMed ID
18793286 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lancet. 1996 Nov 9;348(9037):1258
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-9-1996
Author
W. Hall
C. Sannibale
Author Affiliation
National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales. Sydney, Australia.
Source
Lancet. 1996 Nov 9;348(9037):1258
Date
Nov-9-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adoption
Adult
Age of Onset
Alcoholism - classification - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Male
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
8909376 View in PubMed
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How epidemiology can help the clinician.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213249
Source
Bull Hosp Jt Dis. 1996;55(4):199-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
M L Skovron
Author Affiliation
Musculoskeletal Epidemiology Unit, Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York University School of Medicine, New York, USA.
Source
Bull Hosp Jt Dis. 1996;55(4):199-202
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Incidence
Low Back Pain - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Sweden
PubMed ID
8933951 View in PubMed
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Development and evaluation of an index to predict early postmenopausal bone loss.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67841
Source
Bone. 1992;13(4):337-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
J A Falch
L. Sandvik
E C Van Beresteijn
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Aker University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Source
Bone. 1992;13(4):337-41
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Netherlands
Norway
Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal - metabolism - pathology
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Abstract
An index to predict individual postmenopausal bone loss is presented. The index is developed by means of data from a 10-year prospective Norwegian study in which bone mass of the distal forearm was measured annually in 73 women. All the women were 47 years old and premenopausal at inclusion. Independent risk factors for postmenopausal bone loss were identified by applying multivariate regression analysis on anthropometric, biochemical, nutritional, and life-style variables measured at menopause. The analysis identified low body weight, reduced renal phosphate reabsorption, and smoking as significant independent risk factors, and by means of these three factors a predictive index for postmenopausal bone loss was developed. This index was validated by using data from a 10-year longitudinal Dutch study, in which bone mass of the proximal radius was measured annually in 86 women, aged between 49 and 57 years and perimenopausal at inclusion. We defined women with the highest index score as "high-risk persons." According to this definition approximately 25% of the perimenopausal women were classified as high-risk persons, and the estimated sensitivity/specificity/positive predictive power were 36%, 89%, and 74%, respectively, when used to select women with a postmenopausal bone loss above average. We conclude that the index may be helpful in identifying healthy perimenopausal women in whom bone mass measurements should be considered.
PubMed ID
1389575 View in PubMed
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Validity of pre-eclampsia registration in the medical birth registry of norway for women participating in the norwegian mother and child cohort study, 1999-2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263217
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2014 Sep;28(5):362-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Kari Klungsøyr
Quaker E Harmon
Linn B Skard
Ingeborg Simonsen
Elise T Austvoll
Elin R Alsaker
Anne Starling
Lill Trogstad
Per Magnus
Stephanie M Engel
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2014 Sep;28(5):362-71
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Norway - epidemiology
Pre-Eclampsia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa), a prospective population-based pregnancy cohort, is a valuable database for studying causes of pre-eclampsia. Pre-eclampsia data in MoBa come from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway (MBRN); thus, we wanted to study the validity of MBRN pre-eclampsia registration for MoBa women.
We selected all MoBa pregnancies with pre-eclampsia registered in the MBRN (n?=?4081) and a random control group (n?=?2000) without pre-eclampsia registrations. After excluding two delivery units not participating in MoBa and one no longer operating, units were asked to provide copies of antenatal charts with blood pressure and urinary measurements from all antenatal visits during pregnancy, and hospital discharge codes from the delivery stay. We received data for 5340 pregnancies delivered 1999-2010 (87% of all eligible). We calculated positive predictive value (PPV), and sensitivity and specificity of MBRN registration, using hypertension and proteinuria on the antenatal charts and/or hospital discharge codes indicating pre-eclampsia as gold standard.
Overall PPV was 83.9% [95% CI 82.7, 85.1] and was higher when women were primiparous, or delivered preterm or low birthweight infants. Severe pre-eclampsia in the MBRN was found to be a true severe pre-eclampsia in 70% of cases. Extrapolating to the total MoBa population, the estimated sensitivity was low - 43.0% (38.7, 48.2) - while specificity was high - 99.2% (99.2, 99.3). False negative cases seemed to have mild forms of pre-eclampsia.
PPV and specificity of pre-eclampsia registration in the MBRN during 1999-2010 was satisfactory, while sensitivity was low.
Notes
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Comment In: Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2014 Sep;28(5):351-225155997
PubMed ID
25040774 View in PubMed
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Self-reported headache frequency in Canadian adolescents: validation and follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature176226
Source
Headache. 2005 Feb;45(2):127-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Joseph M Dooley
K E Gordon
E P Wood
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University, IWK Health Centre, Department of Pediatrics, Halifax, NS, Canada.
Source
Headache. 2005 Feb;45(2):127-31
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Headache - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Prevalence
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Abstract
To validate our previous estimates of the prevalence of frequent headache and associated factors in a new sample of 12- to 13-year-old adolescent Canadians, and to explore if estimates of the prevalence of frequent headache and associated factors remain stable within the original cohort after a two-year interval.
We analyzed the self-administered questionnaire microdata files of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY: 1998-1999). 1694 respondents representing 724,400 youth aged 12 to 13 years were used to validate the prevalence in our initial estimates. From the initial cohort, 1764 respondents representing 819,600 youth, now aged 14 to 15 years, were used to examine whether frequent headache prevalence or associated factors had changed in the intervening two years.
Among the analyzed individuals, 26.3% of 12- to 13-year olds and 31.2% of 14- to 15-year olds reported frequent headaches of "about once a week" or more often (P= .001). Our previous study of the NLSCY: 1996-1997 found a prevalence of 26.6% in 12- to 13-year olds. We previously identified 22 risk factors, of which 15 were replicated and one proxy was available within this iteration of the survey. For the 12- to 13-year olds, 14/16 were associated (P
PubMed ID
15705117 View in PubMed
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Comment on "American Indians/Alaska natives and dementia".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature185035
Source
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2003 Apr-Jun;17(2):132; author reply 132
Publication Type
Article
Author
Myron F Weiner
Roger N Rosenberg
Munro Cullum
Source
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2003 Apr-Jun;17(2):132; author reply 132
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - ethnology
Dementia - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Indians, North American
Life Style
Mental Status Schedule
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Sample Size
Notes
Comment On: Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord. 2002;16 Suppl 2:S89-9512351922
PubMed ID
12794393 View in PubMed
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Screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm, a one-year follow up: an interview study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141549
Source
J Vasc Nurs. 2010 Sep;28(3):97-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
C. Berterö
P. Carlsson
F. Lundgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. carina.bertero@liu.se
Source
J Vasc Nurs. 2010 Sep;28(3):97-101
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal - nursing - psychology - ultrasonography
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Pilot Projects
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and the finding of an enlarged aorta cause worries and affect the living situations of men with aneurysms or of their families within a 12-month follow-up period. Men invited to ultrasound screening and having an enlarged aorta (>or=30 mm) were invited for an interview. In total, 10 men were interviewed. The semi-structured interview was conducted by using an interview guide. Data was analyzed by using an interpretative phenomenological method. Three themes were identified: (i) feeling secure being under superintendence; (ii) living as usual, but repressing thoughts; and (iii) feeling disillusionment due to negative outcome. Being given the message that an enlarged aorta was discovered at the screening was manageable; hence, continuing growth of the aorta led to some unpleasant feelings. The men were living as usual; however, they all had some reflections about having an AAA and that something could happen when they least expected it. They reported thoughts about the consequences of the enlarged aorta itself and the surgery. In a one-year retrospective interview, men who have had an aneurysm detected in a screening program for AAA reported feeling secure being under superintendence. The one finding in our study concerning worries and effects on life situation could be interpreted as disillusionment due to negative outcomes. Decisions to introduce screening for AAA in Sweden and other countries with ongoing programs should be considered to include guidelines for how to handle disillusionment.
PubMed ID
20709266 View in PubMed
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456 records – page 1 of 46.