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273 records – page 1 of 28.

The value of the second blood culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220364
Source
J Infect Dis. 1993 Sep;168(3):795-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1993

Diabetes in Ontario: determination of prevalence and incidence using a validated administrative data algorithm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191212
Source
Diabetes Care. 2002 Mar;25(3):512-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Janet E Hux
Frank Ivis
Virginia Flintoft
Adina Bica
Author Affiliation
Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Canada. jan@ices.on.ca
Source
Diabetes Care. 2002 Mar;25(3):512-6
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Geography
Humans
Incidence
Ontario - epidemiology
Prevalence
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
Accurate information about the magnitude and distribution of diabetes can inform policy and support health care evaluation. We linked physician service claims (PSCs) and hospital discharge abstracts (HDAs) to determine diabetes prevalence and incidence.
A retrospective cohort was constructed using administrative data from the national HDA database, PSCs for Ontario (population 11 million), and registries carrying demographics and vital statistics. All HDAs and PSCs bearing a diagnosis of diabetes (ICD9-CM 250) were selected for 1991-1999. Two previously reported algorithms for identification of diabetes were applied as follows: "1-claim" (any HDA or PSC showing diabetes) and "2-claim" (one HDA or two PSCs within 2 years showing diabetes). Incident cases were defined as individuals who met the criteria for diabetes for the first time after at least 2 years of observation. For validation, diagnostic data abstracted from primary care charts (n=3,317) of 57 randomly selected physicians were linked to the administrative data cohort, and sensitivity and specificity were calculated.
-In 1998, 696,938 individuals met the 1-claim criteria and 528,280 met the 2-claim criteria. Sensitivity for diabetes was 90 and 86%; for the 1- and 2-claim algorithms, specificity was 92 and 97%, respectively, and positive predictive values were 61 and 80%, respectively. Using the 2-claim algorithm, the all-age prevalence increased from 3.2% in 1993 to 4.5% in 1998 (6.1% in adults). Incidence remained stable.
Administrative data can be used to establish population-based incidence and prevalence of diabetes. Diabetes prevalence is increasing in Ontario and is considerably higher than self-reported rates.
PubMed ID
11874939 View in PubMed
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A comparison of self-reported cellular telephone use with subscriber data: agreement between the two methods and implications for risk estimation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80335
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 2007 Feb;28(2):130-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Schüz Joachim
Johansen Christoffer
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. joachim@cancer.dk
Source
Bioelectromagnetics. 2007 Feb;28(2):130-6
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cellular Phone
Denmark
Electromagnetic fields
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Time Factors
Abstract
Epidemiologic studies on adverse health effects of cellular telephone use have assessed exposure either by self-reported use based on questionnaire data or by using data on subscriptions for a cellular telephone provided by network operators. With the latter approach, subjects are misclassified when they regularly use a cellular telephone subscribed in someone else's or in a company name or when they subscribe for a cellular telephone which they use only occasionally. Self-reported use is hampered by recall difficulties and possible differential participation by exposure. In Denmark, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of cellular telephone subscribers (including the entire Danish population) and a case-control study on brain tumors and cellular telephone use (with 1355 participants) and, thus, had the opportunity to compare the two exposure measures with two large-scale data sets, using self-reported use as a "gold standard." Overall, there was a fair agreement (kappa value of 0.30, 95% confidence interval 0.23-0.36), with a low sensitivity (30%) and a high specificity (94%). Agreement was slightly better for controls, and low-grade glioma cases compared to high-grade glioma cases and meningioma cases. A comparison of odds ratios (OR) of the case-control data set based on either self-reported use or on subscriber data shows no major differences, giving OR of 0.7 and 0.6 for acoustic neuroma, 0.9 and 1.1 for glioma and 0.9 and 0.7 for meningioma. A discussion of the two exposure measures reveals that they both have limitations with regard to a potential underestimation of an association and there is some concern whether they are good enough to allow a detection of possibly only subtle changes in risk. These limitations can be minimized in prospective follow-up studies.
PubMed ID
17019732 View in PubMed
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Reproducibility of the Banff schema in reporting protocol biopsies of stable renal allografts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190042
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2002 Jun;17(6):1081-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2002
Author
James Gough
David Rush
John Jeffery
Peter Nickerson
Rachel McKenna
Kim Solez
Kiril Trpkov
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, University of Manitoba Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. gough@ucalgary.ca
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2002 Jun;17(6):1081-4
Date
Jun-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biopsy - methods - standards
Canada
Graft Rejection - pathology
Humans
Kidney Transplantation - pathology
Observer Variation
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
There is evidence that biopsy of stable renal allografts may be of value in predicting chronic allograft nephropathy, the main cause of graft loss. However, the reproducibility of such histological evaluation has not been tested in this setting. We tested the reproducibility of the Banff schema for this purpose.
We rated acute and chronic changes in 184 protocol biopsies. Individual pathologists at two different Canadian transplant centres reported independently.
There was agreement in 73.53, 42.86, and 77.08% of cases in assigning a diagnosis of acute rejection, borderline changes (as defined in the schema), and no acute rejection, respectively. Applying kappa statistics, there was very good agreement in making the diagnosis of acute rejection vs no acute rejection (kappa 0.77). There was good inter-observer agreement in scoring glomerulitis, intimal arteritis, interstitial infiltrates, tubulitis, and arteriolar hyalinosis. Rating chronic changes also gave good inter-observer agreement (kappa=0.53, 0.65, and 0.62, respectively, for mild, moderate, and severe chronic allograft nephropathy). Agreement on transplant glomerulopathy was, however, poor.
We conclude that the Banff classification provides a reproducible method for the histological assessment of protocol renal allograft biopsies in stable grafts. Such biopsies may be valuable in detecting subclinical rejection and early chronic allograft nephropathy and may also be used as surrogate end-points in the evaluation of therapy to prevent the latter.
PubMed ID
12032200 View in PubMed
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A critical review of papers from clinical cancer research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21459
Source
Acta Oncol. 1998;37(4):339-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
E. Skovlund
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Cancer Society and Section of Medical Statistics, University of Oslo. eva.skovlund@klinmed.uio.no
Source
Acta Oncol. 1998;37(4):339-45
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clinical Trials - trends
Humans
Neoplasms - pathology - therapy
Norway
Periodicals - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design - standards
Retrospective Studies
Statistics
Abstract
A review of 75 original articles from clinical cancer research in Norway is presented. Articles published in 1993 and with at least one Norwegian author were included in the review. Sixty papers were observational, whereas 15 were experimental. Of the observational studies 44 were retrospective. Most of the papers concerned prognostic factors. Prior hypotheses were explicitly defined in 16 papers only, and less than half of the articles described inclusion and exclusion criteria. Sample size calculations were performed in four papers only. The choice of statistical method was considered to be suitable in 22 of the 58 articles presenting statistical inferences. Problems related to multiple significance testing were rarely addressed, although the median number of p-values reported was as high as 8. Confidence intervals for main findings were presented in 14 papers. For proper planning of studies, as well as for analysis and interpretation of study results, statistical advice is indeed required.
PubMed ID
9743455 View in PubMed
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The predictive accuracy of pre-adoption video review in adoptees from Russian and Eastern European orphanages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183343
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2003 Sep;42(7):585-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Jon L Boone
Margaret K Hostetter
Carol Cohen Weitzman
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8064, USA.
Source
Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2003 Sep;42(7):585-90
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Bulgaria
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Orphanages
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Romania
Russia
Video Recording - utilization
Abstract
Many internationally adopted children have a pre-adoption video for prospective adoptive parents to review before their commitment to adopt. No published report to date has examined the value of the pre-adoption video evaluation (PreAVE) as a predictor of post-adoption developmental status. The present study was designed to determine whether PreAVE can predict the post-adoption developmental status of internationally adopted children. In this retrospective chart review, children who presented to the Yale International Adoption Clinic between December 1998 and September 2000, and had both a PreAVE and a post-adoption developmental evaluation (PosADE) were selected (N = 20) PreAVE was done using the Denver II and PosADE was done using the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 2nd edition. The Pearson r coefficient between the two ratings was determined and sensitivity and specificity were calculated. There was a significant correlation between the PreAVE and the PosADEs (r = 0.53, p = 0.01).The sensitivity of PreAVE to detect moderate to severe developmental delay was 43% and the specificity was 85%. Although ratings of development on PreAVE are similar to PosADE, the ability to detect moderate to severe developmental delay by video review is limited.
PubMed ID
14552516 View in PubMed
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Fatal fetal abnormalities. Route of delivery and effect of the development of antepartum diagnostics in the last 13 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64947
Source
J Reprod Med. 1992 Jul;37(7):645-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1992
Author
P. Kirkinen
P. Jouppila
R. Herva
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Reprod Med. 1992 Jul;37(7):645-8
Date
Jul-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cesarean Section
Delivery, Obstetric
Female
Fetal Diseases - diagnosis
Fetus - abnormalities
Humans
Pregnancy
Prenatal Diagnosis
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
The appropriateness of cesarean section as the route of delivery in pregnancies complicated by fatal fetal abnormalities was evaluated in an obstetric population of 47,924 deliveries during the years 1978-90. The incidence of fatal fetal abnormalities was 0.50% and did not change during the study period. The cesarean section rate was twice that in the whole obstetric population, and the procedure was performed mainly for inappropriate fetal indications. One-third of the sections were caused by antepartum or intrapartum fetal distress. After the advent of sophisticated real-time ultrasound equipment, the obstetric management of those cases seemed to increase, but later the incidence of cesarean sections for fetal indications decreased, from increased experience with assessing the prognosis of malformed fetuses and increased opportunities to examine the fetal karyotype. Some conservatism seems justified when choosing obstetric management of a malformed fetus before large, controlled, clinical studies become available.
PubMed ID
1522572 View in PubMed
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Quality of life instruments and definitions in individuals with spinal cord injury: a systematic review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146553
Source
Spinal Cord. 2010 Jun;48(6):438-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
M R Hill
V K Noonan
B M Sakakibara
W C Miller
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Spinal Cord. 2010 Jun;48(6):438-50
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Humans
Psychometrics - instrumentation
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Sickness Impact Profile
Spinal Cord Injuries - physiopathology - psychology
Abstract
A systematic review.
To critically review quality of life (QOL) instruments used with spinal cord injury (SCI) populations.
Vancouver, Canada.
A systematic literature review was conducted for publications assessing the measurement properties of QOL outcome measures. Pre-established criteria were used to evaluate the measurement properties.
Fourteen articles reporting on 13 QOL instruments met the inclusion criteria, including the Patient Reported Impact of Spasticity Measure (PRISM), Quality of Well-being Scale, Qualiveen, Sickness Impact Profile (SIP68), Short Form (SF)-36, SF-36V, SF-12, SF-6D, Quality of Life Index, Quality of Life Profile for Adults with Physical Disabilities (QOLP-PD), Satisfaction with Life Scale, Sense of Well-being Index (SWBI), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF scale (WHOQOL-BREF). The SF-36 and WHOQOL-BREF have been widely used and validated. The SIP68, QOLP-PD, SF-36V, and SWBI are promising with limited investigation. The Qualiveen and PRISM performed well and are specific to SCI complications.
The WHOQOL-BREF is presently the most acceptable and established instrument to assess QOL after SCI. The SIP68, QOLP-PD, SF-36V, and SWBI are promising; however, require further evaluation of their measurement properties.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20029393 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of the interpretation of serial ultrasound examinations in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis in children: a retrospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104672
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2014 Aug;65(3):218-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Michael Stamm
Anna Zavodni
Lesley Mitchell
John Ross Bonanni
Michelle Noga
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta Hospital, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can Assoc Radiol J. 2014 Aug;65(3):218-24
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alberta - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Venous Thrombosis - epidemiology - ultrasonography
Abstract
To assess ultrasound intrascan variability and the potential error rate of serial ultrasounds in the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis in children.
A retrospective cohort review of imaging results of children having at least 3 serial ultrasound examinations of the same region within a 2-month period. The results were interpreted as either (1) inadequately visualized or (2) the absence or presence of deep venous thrombosis, and were categorized by location. Serial imaging findings then were further categorized based on results and clinical information.
Sixty-four patients and 157 vessel segments were included in the study. Deep venous thrombosis was documented in 58 patients. Concordant results were observed in 26 patients (40.1%), clot resolution in 17 patients (26.6%), clot formation in 12 patients (18.8%), and discordant results in 9 patients (14%). Twenty-one of 64 patients (32.8%) had at least 1 vessel inadequately imaged.
The inconsistency of serial ultrasound results in up to 25% of patients calls attention to the potential inaccuracy of ultrasound for diagnosis and follow-up of deep venous thrombosis in children. The high proportion of patients with at least 1 inadequately visualized vessel also highlights the limitation of ultrasound in the diagnosis of pediatric deep venous thrombosis.
PubMed ID
24650872 View in PubMed
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Validity of histology for the diagnosis of paediatric coeliac disease: a Swedish multicentre study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277457
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2016;51(4):427-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Caroline Montén
Kaj Bjelkenkrantz
Audur H Gudjonsdottir
Lars Browaldh
Henrik Arnell
Åsa Torinsson Naluai
Daniel Agardh
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2016;51(4):427-33
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Biopsy
Celiac Disease - pathology
Child
Child, Preschool
Duodenum - pathology
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infant
Male
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE Histological evaluation of intestinal biopsies for the diagnosis of coeliac disease can be challenging and compatible with risk of misdiagnosis. The aim was to evaluate the agreement of pathological diagnosis for coeliac disease in children investigated at four major paediatric university hospitals in Sweden. MATERIALS AND METHODS Intestinal duodenal biopsies were collected from 402 children at median 9.7 years (1.4-18.3 years). A pathologist at each hospital performed the primary evaluation. A designated pathologist, blinded to the primary evaluation, performed a second Marsh classification of biopsies (M0 to M3c) taken from the bulb and duodenum separately. Kappa (?) scores between first and second evaluation determined the agreement. Plasma samples were collected at the day of intestinal biopsy and analysed for tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies (tTGA) using radioligand-binding assays. RESULTS Marsh scores were concordant in 229/356 biopsies (64%, ? = 0.52, p
PubMed ID
26635075 View in PubMed
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273 records – page 1 of 28.