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Evaluating leisure activities in the oldest old.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169779
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2006 Mar;13(1):31-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2006
Author
Ingeborg Nilsson
Anne G Fisher
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Occupational Therapy, Umeå University, Sweden. Ingeborg.Nilsson@occupther.umu.se
Source
Scand J Occup Ther. 2006 Mar;13(1):31-7
Date
Mar-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Cross-Sectional Studies
Geriatric Assessment
Humans
Leisure Activities
Psychometrics - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
To determine whether the Modified NPS Interest Checklist (MNPS) could be developed as a tool with linear measures of four dimensions of leisure: Interest, Performance, Motivation, and Well-being.
A cross-sectional descriptive study including 156 volunteers born between 1904 and 1917 and living in urban or rural northern Sweden. Each participant was individually interviewed at her/his place of residence. Subsequent data were subjected to a series of Rasch analyses using FACETS.
The items and persons demonstrated acceptable goodness-of-fit across all four dimensions in the MNPS checklist. The Rasch equivalent of Cronbach's alpha was 0.98 for items, and ranged from 0.66 to 0.75 for persons.
The MNPS shows evidence for acceptable internal scale validity, person response validity, and scale reliability. This study provides initial evidence that the MNPS is a valid tool for measuring leisure among the oldest old. While this study provides the first psychometric examination of an assessment designed to evaluate different dimensions of leisure, more research is needed to further assess validity and reliability of this tool with the elderly and with other groups.
PubMed ID
16615413 View in PubMed
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Interrater reliability using Modified Norton Scale, Pressure Ulcer Card, Short Form-Mini Nutritional Assessment by registered and enrolled nurses in clinical practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87064
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Mar;17(5):618-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2008
Author
Bååth Carina
Hall-Lord Marie-Louise
Idvall Ewa
Wiberg-Hedman Katarina
Wilde Larsson Bodil
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden. carina.baath@kau.se
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2008 Mar;17(5):618-26
Date
Mar-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing
Nutrition Assessment
Pressure Ulcer - nursing - physiopathology
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
AIM: Examine the interrater reliability between and among registered and enrolled nurses using Modified Norton Scale, Pressure Ulcer Card and Short Form-Mini Nutritional Assessment. BACKGROUND: In Sweden, registered nurses and enrolled nurses usually co-operate in patient care. National guidelines emphasize that reliable and valid assessment tools should be used. Interrater reliability for regular use of assessment tools is seldom studied. DESIGN CROSS-SECTIONAL: Registered nurses and enrolled nurses made 228 assessments of patients' skin, risk for pressure ulcer and malnutrition, in patients with hip fracture and patients who had suffered a stroke. RESULTS: The interrater reliability of the Modified Norton Score total score was very good among registered nurses, good among enrolled nurses and between both groups. There was good, moderate and fair agreement on the subscales. Interrater reliability of Short Form Mini-Nutritional Assesment screening score was very good between both groups, good among registered nurses and moderate among enrolled nurses. There was good and moderate agreement on the items. There was good, moderate and fair agreement between and among registered nurses and enrolled nurses when using the Pressure Ulcer Card. CONCLUSION: The Modified Norton Scale and Short Form Mini-Nutritional Assessment were reasonably understandable and easy to utilize in clinical care. Therefore, it seems possible for nurses to accomplish assessment using these tools. The agreement level was low for most skin sites except sacrum when nurses assessed patients' skin with the Pressure Ulcer Card. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The utilize of reliable and valid assessment tools is important in clinical practice. The tools could be used as an aid to the clinical judgement and therefore identify patients at risk for pressure ulcers and malnutrition. Pressure ulcer grading is a difficult skill that requires training and time to develop.
PubMed ID
18279294 View in PubMed
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Reproducibility of an extensive self-report questionnaire used in secondary coronary prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283790
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 May;45(3):269-276
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2017
Author
Peersen
Munkhaugen
Gullestad
Dammen
Moum
Otterstad
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2017 May;45(3):269-276
Date
May-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Norway
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Secondary Prevention
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Self-reported information from questionnaires is frequently used in clinical epidemiological studies, but few provide information on the reproducibility of instruments applied in secondary coronary prevention studies. This study aims to assess the test-retest reproducibility of the questionnaire applied in the cross-sectional NORwegian CORonary (NOR-COR) Prevention Study.
In the NOR-COR study 1127 coronary heart disease (CHD) patients completed a self-report questionnaire consisting of 249 questions, of which there are both validated instruments and de novo questions. Test-retest reliability of the instrument was estimated after four weeks in 99 consecutive coronary patients. Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and Kappa (?) were calculated.
The mean interval between test and retest was 33 (±6.4) days. Reproducibility values for questions in the first part of the questionnaire did not differ from those in the latter. A good to very good reproducibility was found for lifestyle factors (smoking: ? = 1.0; exercise: ICC = 0.90), medical factors (drug adherence: ICC = 0.74; sleep apnoea: ICC = 0.87), and psychosocial factors (anxiety and depression: ICC = 0.95; quality of life 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF12): ICC = 0.89), as well as for the majority of de-novo-created variables covering the patient's perceptions, motivation, needs, and preferences.
The present questionnaire demonstrates a highly acceptable reproducibility for all key items and instruments. It thus emerges as a valuable tool for evaluating patient factors associated with coronary risk factor control in CHD patients.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28181463 View in PubMed
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Validity and reliability of the Swedish version of the Patient Specific Functional Scale in patients treated surgically for carpometacarpal joint osteoarthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118535
Source
J Hand Ther. 2013 Jan-Mar;26(1):53-60; quiz 61
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jenny Rosengren
Nina Brodin
Author Affiliation
Department of Hand Surgery, South General Hospital, Sjukhusbacken 10, 118 83 Stockholm, Sweden. jenny.rosengren@sodersjukhuset.se
Source
J Hand Ther. 2013 Jan-Mar;26(1):53-60; quiz 61
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carpometacarpal Joints - physiopathology - surgery
Cross-Sectional Studies
Disability Evaluation
Female
Humans
Male
Osteoarthritis - physiopathology - surgery
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Abstract
Cross-sectional clinical measurements.
Activity limitation is often persistent after surgically treated carpometacarpal (CMC) joint osteoarthritis (OA).
To describe content and concurrent validity, test-retest reliability and internal consistency of the Swedish version of the Patient Specific Functional Scale (PSFS) in patients with surgically treated CMC joint OA.
Fifty-eight patients were assessed ten weeks after surgical treatment of CMC joint OA. PSFS, the shorter version of Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (Quick DASH), EuroQol-5Dimensions (EQ-5D), pain intensity, joint movement of CMC joint, grip and pinch strength were assessed. Classification of activities was done according to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Spearman correlation, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Kappa were calculated to assess validity, test-retest reliability and internal consistency. The PSFS was administered twice, 2-3 days apart.
All of the activity limitations stated in the PSFS could be classified according to the activity component in the ICF. Significant correlations for the PSFS were obtained with pain at rest (r(s) = -0.36) and the Quick DASH (r(s) = -0.28). Test-retest reliability was good, ICC (0.79) and the three items of the PSFS correlated 0.69-0.83 with the total score of PSFS.
Content validity was excellent, concurrent validity was low-moderate, as in earlier studies. The PSFS could be a valuable supplement to existing measures in measuring activity limitations in individuals with surgically treated CMC joint OA.
Not applicable.
PubMed ID
23195850 View in PubMed
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Translation and validation of the Clinical Trial Nursing Questionnaire in Swedish-A first step to clarify the clinical research nurse role in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302012
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2019 Jul; 28(13-14):2696-2705
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Validation Studies
Date
Jul-2019
Author
Beatrice Backman Lönn
Niclas Olofsson
Mats Jong
Author Affiliation
Department of Research & Development, Region Västernorrland, Sundsvall Hospital, Sundsvall, Sweden.
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2019 Jul; 28(13-14):2696-2705
Date
Jul-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Validation Studies
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Nurse's Role
Reproducibility of Results
Research Personnel
Surveys and Questionnaires - standards
Sweden
Translations
Abstract
To translate the Clinical Trial Nursing Questionnaire (CTNQ) into Swedish and test it for face and content validity as well as internal consistency and reproducibility using test-retest procedures.
In many countries, as in Sweden, a registered nurse can be involved in research by becoming a clinical research nurse. The clinical research nurse plays a pivotal role in clinical studies as a part of the research team. Scales have been developed and used with the objective to clarify the role of clinical research nurses: one of them is the CTNQ.
A quantitative cross-sectional design with a test-retest procedure was applied to validate the translated questionnaire. By using a snowball sampling method, relevant participants were identified and 49 registered nurses working in the field of research as clinical research nurses answered the questionnaire on two occasions. An expert panel of three clinical research nurses evaluated the questionnaire for face and content validity. The STROBE checklist for observational research has been followed for presenting the research (see File S1).
Face and content validity was agreed upon in the expert panel group. Tests for internal consistency of the CTNQ was calculated and showed a high Cronbach's alpha for both the frequency and importance subscales. The test-retest correlation analysis (reproducibility) also revealed a high correlation coefficient for both subscales.
The CTNQ-SWE is a valid and robust instrument in a Swedish version. The instrument can be of importance in assessing the role of clinical research nurses in Sweden in future studies.
Use of the CTNQ-SWE in future research can be of value for clarification and professional development of the clinical research nurse role in Sweden. The further use of the CTNQ in Sweden can be of value in understanding the process where licensed nurses make a transition into becoming a clinical research nurse, and to identify needs for customised education.
PubMed ID
30938002 View in PubMed
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Methodological issues in analyzing small populations using CCHS cycles based on the official language minority studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105855
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S55-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Ewa Makvandi
Louise Bouchard
Pierre-Jerôme Bergeron
Golnaz Sedigh
Author Affiliation
RRASFO, University of Ottawa. ewa.makvandi@gmail.com.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013;104(6 Suppl 1):S55-9
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Health Surveys
Humans
Language
Minority Groups
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Selection Bias
Abstract
Statistical analyses for small populations or small domains of interest can be challenging. To obtain reliable estimates, only very large surveys such as the Canadian Community Health Survey can be considered. However, despite its good geographical and temporal coverage, the analysis of small populations in smaller regions (e.g., health regions) and in regards to specific health issues remains challenging. We will look at the methodological issues in analysis of small populations in relation to sampling and non-sampling survey errors that affect the precision and accuracy of the estimates. Francophone minorities in Canada will be used to illustrate the issues throughout the paper.
PubMed ID
24300323 View in PubMed
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Nursing activities, nurse staffing and adverse patient outcomes as perceived by hospital nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128742
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2012 Jun;21(11-12):1584-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Saima Hinno
Pirjo Partanen
Katri Vehviläinen-Julkunen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. hinno@student.uef.fi
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2012 Jun;21(11-12):1584-93
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Finland
Humans
Netherlands
Nursing
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology
Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
Reproducibility of Results
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To investigate the relationships between nursing activities, nurse staffing and adverse patient outcomes in hospital settings as perceived by registered nurses in Finland and the Netherlands and to compare the results obtained in the two countries.
Previous research indicates that a higher proportion of registered nurses in the staff mix results in better patient outcomes. Knowledge of the relationship between nurse staffing and adverse patient outcomes is crucial to optimise the management of professional nursing resources and patient care.
A cross-sectional, descriptive questionnaire survey.
Registered nurses employed in hospitals in Finland (n = 535) and the Netherlands (n = 334), with overall response rates of 44·9% and 33·4%, respectively, participated.
The patient-to-nurse ratio was on average 8·74:1 and did not vary significantly between the countries. However, there were fewer registered nurses and significantly more licensed practical nurses among the Dutch hospital staff than the Finnish staff. In addition, Finnish nurses performed non-nursing and administrative activities more frequently than the Dutch nurses and reported more dissatisfaction with the availability of support services. Frequencies of patient falls were related to the patient-to-nurse ratio in both countries. Finnish participants reported the occurrence of adverse patient outcomes more frequently.
Significant associations were found between nurse staffing and adverse patient outcomes in hospital settings. Compared with the Netherlands, in Finland, nurses appear to have higher workloads, there are higher patient-to-nurse ratios, and these adverse staffing conditions are associated with higher rates of adverse patient outcomes.
The findings provide valuable insights into the potential effects of major changes or reductions in nursing staff on the occurrence of adverse patient outcomes in hospital settings.
PubMed ID
22171625 View in PubMed
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The psychometric testing of the Nursing Teamwork Survey in Iceland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282696
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2016 Jun;22(3):267-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Helga Bragadóttir
Beatrice J Kalisch
Sigríður Bríet Smáradóttir
Heiður Hrund Jónsdóttir
Source
Int J Nurs Pract. 2016 Jun;22(3):267-74
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Iceland
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff
Patient care team
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of the Nursing Teamwork Survey-Icelandic (NTS-Icelandic), which was translated from US English to Icelandic. The Nursing Teamwork Survey, with 33 items, measures overall teamwork and five factors of teamwork: trust, team orientation, backup, shared mental models, and team leadership. The psychometric testing of the NTS-Icelandic was carried out on data from a pilot study and a national study. The sample for a pilot study included 123 nursing staff from five units, and the sample for a national study included 925 nursing staff from 27 inpatient units. The overall test-retest intraclass correlation coefficient in the pilot study was 0.693 (lower bound?=?0.498, upper bound?=?0.821) (p?
PubMed ID
26878834 View in PubMed
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The measurement of uncertainty in caregivers of patients with heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112886
Source
J Nurs Meas. 2013;21(1):23-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Karen Harkness
Heather Arthur
Robert McKelvie
Author Affiliation
Hamilton Health Sciences/McMaster University Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. harkness@hhsc.ca
Source
J Nurs Meas. 2013;21(1):23-42
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Caregivers - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Heart Failure
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Uncertainty
Abstract
Family caregivers of heart failure (HF) patients describe feelings of uncertainty; however, studies measuring uncertainty in caregivers of HF patients are extremely sparse. This study examined the validity and reliability of the Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale-Family Member form (PPUS-FM) in caregivers of HF patients.
Caregivers (n = 50) of community-dwelling HF patients completed the PPUS-FM, Caregiver Reaction Assessment (CRA) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in this cross-sectional study.
Significant correlations emerged among PPUS-FM and (a) CRA-schedule burden (p = .499, p
PubMed ID
23786132 View in PubMed
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Validation of the Neonatal Satisfaction Survey (NSS-8) in six Norwegian neonatal intensive care units: a quantitative cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294895
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 03 27; 18(1):222
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
03-27-2018
Author
Inger Hilde Hagen
Marit Følsvik Svindseth
Erik Nesset
Roderick Orner
Valentina Cabral Iversen
Author Affiliation
NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Aalesund, Postbox 1517, 6025, Aalesund, Norway. inger.h.hagen@ntnu.no.
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2018 03 27; 18(1):222
Date
03-27-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care Units, Neonatal
Norway
Parents - psychology
Personal Satisfaction
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
The experience of having their new-borns admitted to an intensive care unit (NICU) can be extremely distressing. Subsequent risk of post-incident-adjustment difficulties are increased for parents, siblings, and affected families. Patient and next of kin satisfaction surveys provide key indicators of quality in health care. Methodically constructed and validated survey tools are in short supply and parents' experiences of care in Neonatal Intensive Care Units is under-researched. This paper reports a validation of the Neonatal Satisfaction Survey (NSS-8) in six Norwegian NICUs.
Parents' survey returns were collected using the Neonatal Satisfaction Survey (NSS-13). Data quality and psychometric properties were systematically assessed using exploratory factor analysis, tests of internal consistency, reliability, construct, convergent and discriminant validity. Each set of hospital returns were subjected to an apostasy analysis before an overall satisfaction rate was calculated.
The survey sample of 568 parents represents 45% of total eligible population for the period of the study. Missing data accounted for 1,1% of all returns. Attrition analysis shows congruence between sample and total population. Exploratory factor analysis identified eight factors of concern to parents,"Care and Treatment", "Doctors", "Visits", "Information", "Facilities", "Parents' Anxiety", "Discharge" and "Sibling Visits". All factors showed satisfactory internal consistency, good reliability (Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.70-0.94). For the whole scale of 51 items a 0.95. Convergent validity using Spearman's rank between the eight factors and question measuring overall satisfaction was significant on all factors. Discriminant validity was established for all factors. Overall satisfaction rates ranged from 86 to 90% while for each of the eight factors measures of satisfaction varied between 64 and 86%.
The NSS-8 questionnaire is a valid and reliable scale for measuring parents' assessment of quality of care in NICU. Statistical analysis confirms the instrument's capacity to gauge parents' experiences of NICU. Further research is indicated to validate the survey questionnaire in other Nordic countries and beyond.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29587812 View in PubMed
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418 records – page 1 of 42.